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I was just listening back to a gig I played about two weeks ago. For the most part I was happy with how it went and I felt like I soloed pretty well. I have listened back to it a bunch now and the more I hear it the more I find good and bad in how I played. The good was I kept it thematic and when I played fast which was often on this gig my time stayed pretty good for me. I liked my tone and I hit most of the altissimo stuff I tried.

The one thing that stuck out at me as a big negative tonight is how I didn't shape my double time stuff nearly enough. Everything I played was jazz tongued or slurred. It really just made the lines less effective. I was thinking about how Ed Calle and Mike Scaglione on the Jaco Pastorius Word of mouth Big Band Revisited, one of my favorite albums of all time, would use Tea yeah TIT TIT Tea yeah TIT TIT type of articulations in runs along with normal jazz tonguing a lot in their ascending lines to give the line breath and punch more. they would make space and tension in a double time passage with their articulations. It can really open your sound up and make your sound sizzle.

It's the little things like this that can really take your playing to the next level IMHO. I'm just glad I put my finger on it.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
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I think you got a very good point there. Also everyone seems to articulate differently. The difference between stitt and rollins on sonny side up for example. Stitts articulation is much more basic and straight ahead and when you hear rollins he ghosts a lot and is much more flowing.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Tea yeah TIT TIT T
These are few of my favourite things!

Serously, yes, it's good to try every variation you can think of.

But also, ghost tonguing (sometimes called dooden tonguing and various other things) can be really effective as well, not purely as an effect but when done subtly as an integral part of your melodic playing. It can really help you to get a more individual sound using it to varying degrees.
 
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