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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't think there are manufacturers in Canada, the prestigious makers should be oriented in USA or Europe I guess, am I right?
say if I got a job there working as an engineer, what do I do everyday? :)
I guess it should be pretty interesting working there as my first job lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
kkk how do i like??
I ve made an effort avoid including it whn i post the question ...
its good market size, labour s still inexpensive..it might make a good place for such labor intensive work such as handmade horns. With the right education of techniques, and good materials, good products can be manufactured anywhere (maybe not wine).. However, the general products of China has long ago inherited an image of being cheap, not durable and bad qc.. -_- it is hard to push one Asia made saxophone into the high end market like Selmer Paris regardless of how well it plays lol So, it does not worth bringing all the technologies and high quality machines there if the product cannot sell right.
(I am not quite sure, no business expert ;p)..
 

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My guess is your first 3 months would be spent doing random sampling of the brass stock to verify chemical composition. I suspect the next 3 months would be looking for more interesting work.
 

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The answer to your question is probably no.

I work with a lot of chemical engineers. You guys are expensive and the type of metal work required to make saxophones does not really lend itself to your specialty. From the traditional engineering woodpile, I figure you would find mostly industrial and mechanical engineers. Those guys draw smaller salaries and their specialties cover a wider range of the processes required to build a saxophone.

Just like the processes I am involved in, I figure most saxophone manufacturing is very mature. So a new engineer would probably begin by maintaining and trouble shooting existing production lines. And you would most likely also be involved in continuous improvement efforts and new process development. Depending on who you worked for, you may also find yourself involved in line management. A lot of the engineers I work with spend most of their time in a management role instead of a an engineering function. In some companies, things just gravitate that way.
 
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