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Discussion Starter #1
I naturally move when I play, but notice my time is generally better when I don't move as much. Some movement seems almost involuntary, but maybe it's just habit. Any thoughts?
 

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If you video people playing at a show, movement ImO adds a great deal to the performance. I routinely get much good reaction walking the crowd and I know not many do it. But you have to be comfortable doing it. not contrived. I will dance with the people as I play funk. If I can't get myself to move why would others. But if it messes with your sense of time dont do it. K
 

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I move around a lot when I play and I think it helps, because I'm moving because of and for the music. There can be some issues though, like one student I have that moves to the downbeat...when he plays swing he then puts a slight breath accent on the downbeat which (obviously) sounds pretty corny. Currently on working to get him out of that habit!
 

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Interesting topic. I think all players of every genre move (some subtly and others less so) and sort of dance to the rhythm/groove. The important thing is actually really feeling the groove. Perhaps when you don't move as much, you are feeling the groove a bit more. Funkier tunes with heavier grooves are probably easier to dance to. Just a thought.
 

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I can see where it would be a challenge if you don’t move naturally, and have to think about moving while playing.

I would have to think about NOT moving.
 

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... I routinely get much good reaction walking the crowd and I know not many do it. But you have to be comfortable doing it. not contrived. I will dance with the people as I play funk.
I walk the crowd once every gig. My band members love it. They like to watch peoples' reactions.
 

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I've seen many jazz vids where the guy stands stone still - I don't know how they do it! I saw Gato Barbieri play live once in a small outdoor venue and he stood there like a statue. Even when his serape slipped off his shoulder a little, he didn't move or even wiggle - the bass player came forward and adjusted it for him. Very strange. Anyway, I always at least sway from side to side with the music and pick my feet up a little - it helps the circulation on these long gigs.
 

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I've always moved around, but I try not to do it too much. Sometimes it does throw me off. Same with foot tapping. That only works if your foot has good time!
 

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My flute teacher was fine with swaying and body movements but worked with me to curtail any kind of metronomic type head movements. i found I was nodding my head to the pulse and that was counterproductive but the rest posed no problems and just seems to occur naturally. Watch Lew Tabackin to see some interesting movement, he starts kind of walking in place to whats going on and its very obvious its just a part of his process.
 

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I was taught in grade school that all and every motion besides those required to sound notes was bad and unprofessional.

I wonder how prevalent that approach was at the time, compared to current teaching.
 

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when I practice at home will get up and walk around while doing long tones and warm-up exercises, I just feel like I play better for some reason when I'm moving around and playing.
 

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I can understand "getting into" the music, but when a lot of young sax players I see do it during solos it looks phony or contrived perhaps due to their lack of experience. Music is primarily an aural experience not a visual one. My thinking is that any movement that compliments and reinforces the contours and accents in the music is acceptable. Any excessive movement that detracts or distracts from the music is not. Paul Desmond's left shoulder is a perfect example of movement that compliments the music.


 

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I can understand "getting into" the music, but when a lot of young sax players I see do it during solos it looks phony or contrived perhaps due to their lack of experience. Music is primarily an aural experience not a visual one. My thinking is that any movement that compliments and reinforces the contours and accents in the music is acceptable. Any excessive movement that detracts or distracts from the music is not. Paul Desmond's left shoulder is a perfect example of movement that compliments the music.


Are you sure you don't prefer this saxoclese ;)

 

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When it comes to movement, as long as it's not distracting or well.......just plain stupid, go for it. As for the "entertainment" factor..... My thought about that is if you feel you need to dance around like you're having some sort of seizure, you're either covering up for shortfalls in your playing, or you're doing it for shock factor. Neither of which I'm interested in seeing or hearing.
 
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