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I agree with Guto. After a good overhaul, it should be a wonderful player - I have one with a higher serial number (M207xxx) but not gold-plated and it is among the best sopranos I've ever played. It is a Conn New Wonder II model. You can determine the year it was made by using serial number lists readily available on the internet. DAVE
 

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I had one of these some years back. Beautiful sounding horn, although mine was less good for intonation and in the end i moved on to a more modern horn. But a more mature player should be able to work with it.

I recall I bought and then sold it for around 1000 dollars mark. But it was a relac so maybe a little less desirable.
 

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@Viv99
So what’s the story with this soprano? Are you a player?
 

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Just an aside here, but not too surprising to see a vintage gold plated horn in a green lined case. But yeah, you got a treasure here. If you're just going to flip it, best not to put any work into it beforehand. Just sell as is. You also might want to see what mouthpiece you've got with it. Sometimes those can be treasures as well.
 

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Yup my gold plated Conn also came in a green-lined case. Bought as an attic find also, on original white Conn pads. Great tone, good intonation.
 

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It is a treasure, actually....I mean if by typical used instrument definition you have a top-shelf, sought after model in a top-shelf finish, original case, and apparently undamaged....yeah, it doesn't get much better than that.

As @PigSquealer asked, do you play sax ? Or any other instrument ? If you play any reed instrument I suggest you keep it and have it serviced.
$1000 overhaul ? Maybe. Depends upon where you live.
Plenty of places/regions in US where $600-700 gets you an overhaul (this is about what I'd charge for a Soprano overhaul, $625ish)

If you are not a player of any sort, then indeed on eBay, as-is, providing the keys move up and down and again there is no significant damage (dents, posts which are unsoldered, other body damage)...on an open auction it will fetch min. $750 I can guarantee that. It might even get into a bid war and go for over $1000, just as-is.

Craigslist will NOT get you that amount, but you would not have to ship it. Expect $550-600 in a Craigslist sale, local pickup.

Facebook marketplace you could do better, probably close to eBay value
 

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Agree with the above in regard to maybe best to sell this as it is then, if you are not wanting to play it. Someone will love this horn and invest to keep it. But I am less sure you would get the money back necessarily if you did get it set up.
 

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I second. If you intend to play, be prepared for several hundred bucks to get it playing, then you'll have a great horn on your hands. Otherwise, sell as-is - almost. I'd spend a couple of hours polishing/cleaning it up. That could net you a couple hundred more bucks.
 

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Agree with the above in regard to maybe best to sell this as it is then, if you are not wanting to play it. Someone will love this horn and invest to keep it. But I am less sure you would get the money back necessarily if you did get it set up.
Two ways to look at it.

~ If you (OP) got it for nothing, and you are a Tenor player, although on hiatus.....and you have some inkling you may wanna start playing again....

...you have a goldplated Chu soprano there.

Yes you can cash it out for some decent spending $, maybe use the proceeds to buy a Tenor.

~ But a longer view might be....if you think you are gonna get back into sax, Soprano is (like Tenor) a Bb instrument...so since you acquired it for very little...why not just keep it and when/if the day comes you get passionate enough about sax (maybe Tenor relights your fire and you start playing regularly)...it'd be a hecka NICE soprano to have in your closet.
It's market value is highly unlikely to DECREASE in the next decade.

Also, I will add....even IF it took $1g to refurbish....you could certainly sell a freshly overhauled one for $1.7-2g today (eBay or Facebook, not Craigslist). So you would most certainly recover your investment.
 

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I second. If you intend to play, be prepared for several hundred bucks to get it playing, then you'll have a great horn on your hands. Otherwise, sell as-is - almost. I'd spend a couple of hours polishing/cleaning it up. That could net you a couple hundred more bucks.
Be careful polishing gold plate - it is soft and thin, and may be abraded or worn by harsh polishing.
 
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I agree with Dr G. Leave polishing and other repairs to an expert technician. I don't think just polishing it will get you more money. In fact, I do believe leaving it exactly like you pictured here will get you the highest sale. There is something appealing to a rare horn hunter to know a horn has been stored for decades, and it just an overhaul away from being a great sax again. There is nothing more disappoint than seeing a horn like this that survived decades in a closet only to be damaged by a seller trying to clean it up to get a quick sell.
 

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1) If you even THINK you might play soprano in the future, hang on to this one! You can buy different, but you cannot buy better. That there is an instrument made to the very highest standards for professional use.

I have gotten rid of some horns thinking "I'll never want this" and almost always I have regretted it. I'm thinking of two in particular: the wood flute that I decided I wouldn't hang on to because I really wanted it to be open hole (and today I play only closed hole flutes); and the Holton soprano silver plated with the front F key and the extra keys (the only soprano made with a front F key till Yana and Yama started in the 1980s), and the perfect Meyer and Selmer Soloist mouthpieces in the case.

2) Do NOT take after it with metal polish, unless you have direct personal experience with polishing gold plated saxophones nearly 100 years old and not causing damage. Once you damage the original plating (which looks very good in the photos) the damage is forever.
 
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