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Discussion Starter #1
Does a mouthpiece, like a reed ever go bad? I'm not talking about physical damage done to it by an accident or fall, but wear over time, esp. the hard rubber ones, do you ever need to change it due to wear?
 

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I played the same hard rubber mouthpiece on my alto for 25 years. I changed to a different mouthpiece not because it wore out, but because I heard people here rave about a certain brand of mouthpiece, and based on specific comments from certain members it seemed it was likely to work for me.

Also, there are many people who rave about the old New York Meyer hard rubber mouthpieces, and I think all of them were manufactured more than 30 years ago.
 

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In some cases the facing may get "dull" for ones taste; meaning that the edges on the rails may not be as sharp. And/or, the table may get worn do to staring with a reed on (this is more frequent with metal mouthpieces). Or interior corrosion due to a lack of hygiene or cleaning. If you take care of it and store it correctly; it should last you quite well.

Other than physical wear or damage the other remaining factors for changing pieces are the desire to change ones sound and or approach to with the instrument, changes in instruments (a mouthpiece that works on a Conn 10M might not play the way you like on a Yamaha Custom Z), and GAS (due to fascinations and/or the "chops in a box" virus otherwise known as CBV).

I'm probably forgetting more but that is all I got for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, it seems it would be safe to say that it does not seem to need much changing over at least 5 years, other than to change the sound of the sax
 

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I've heard, from a very reputable source, that the facing curve will wear on a HR piece over time...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It'll probably depend how much you're playing on it. I most likely in the beginning will play a lot, but after I got the basics right, I'll continue to play between 4 and 6 hours per week.
I bet it'll last longer than many who play daily.
 

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It's interesting how saxophonists and clarinetists differ in this regard. It seems to be common knowledge among clarinetists that a facing will wear out after a while and will require touching up. Perhaps clarinet mouthpieces are more sensitive to small changes?
 

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It's interesting how saxophonists and clarinetists differ in this regard. It seems to be common knowledge among clarinetists that a facing will wear out after a while and will require touching up. Perhaps clarinet mouthpieces are more sensitive to small changes?
And many clarinetists also believe their instruments get "blown out". Perhaps clarinetists are more neurotic than saxophonists.
 

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One's taste changes & what sounded perfect a few years ago perhaps does not match up to the sound that you now wish to hear.
Also, with practice, one improves, & could well require more from one's mouthpiece.
I very much doubt that they would wear to any appreciable degree.
 

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It's interesting how saxophonists and clarinetists differ in this regard. It seems to be common knowledge among clarinetists that a facing will wear out after a while and will require touching up. Perhaps clarinet mouthpieces are more sensitive to small changes?
And many clarinetists also believe their instruments get "blown out". Perhaps clarinetists are more neurotic than saxophonists.
Maybe the next time one of these 'clarinetists' makes a comment like this you should check their eye color.
I've got clarinets that are 30+ years older than me that are not 'blown out'. Many have the original mouthpieces and they still look, and play great.

We're not ALL neurotic, and we don't all give in to the hype that you should replace your instrument and/or mouthpiece every 10, 15, 20... years. Take care of your horn and mouthpiece and they will out live you.
 
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