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Playing yesterday in the sun, it was quite hot, 75 degrees which for England is hot. :mrgreen:

I had to keep taking the neck off & whacking it on my leg to remove all the water that was collecting

then the g note started to warble pretty badly..

does hot weather make for more spit? :?: because it certainly seemed like it.
 

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I do a yearly "Santa Claus" parade gig here in Ontario. I find the amount of condensation (not really an increase in saliva I suspect) increases big time in the colder weather.
 

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I had to keep taking the neck off & whacking it on my leg to remove all the water that was collecting
That sounds like a really bad idea.
 

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That sounds like a really bad idea.
I only tap the hole at the bottom of the neck on my leg and then give it a shake, whacking it was probably a bit harsh thing to write..

That seems to get rid of a lot of the spit, I don't want to take mouthpiece off and then have to then retune again...

I was sitting playing on a log in a field, so cleaning equipment wasn't around.
 

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That seems to get rid of a lot of the spit...
In case you missed a couple of the posts above, it's not 'spit.' It's H2O (water), condensed out of the warm air you blow into the horn. But it's strange that you are having this problem in hot weather. As others here have mentioned, in cold weather you will get more condensation than on a hot day. This is because when the air temperature is low the brass in your horn will be considerably cooler than your breath, causing more water to condense on the inside of the horn than it would if the horn was already relatively hot due to warm air temperature.
 

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I too have more problems in the cold. If it gets really bad, I pull a swab through the body and neck, then use a flour sack style dish rag to dry the upper stack pads and key pearls. (I really dislike wet key pearls.) If I only dry the pearl, it comes back quickly. If I dry both, the problem stays away longer.

On tenor, it seems to collect in the bottom bow a lot, especially if I am sitting. I tip the horn upside down and dump out being careful with the direction I tip so that it does not get on any pads.
 
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