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Discussion Starter #1
I have always pretty much played a 7*. But I read about people having different sizes in there MP's so would you buy the same Model Mp (say an STM or V16) in more than one size? If so why?
 

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Picked up a sax in 2002 and here I am.
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A Meyer 5M and 6M I bought years ago to try and liked and kept both, otherwise no.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Just because mouthpieces are the same make and model doesn't mean that various sizes will play anything like the others, or even that the same sizes will play exactly alike. This is actually a good thing because such variability means 'something for everyone' like the old handmade saxes. Plus, life is really too short to be so obsessive that you want different versions of the same mouthpiece, presumably to cover any possible situation that may come up. In reality, the better you get on one great mouthpiece, the more different kinds of playing you can cover with it.
Finally, it might be counter-productive in the physical sense to be constantly changing mouthpieces.
 

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I'm a (vintage) metal Otto Link collector and because of that I have pieces ranging from a 4* to 12* (mostly Links, but also some other brands). I didn't start the collection with different tip sizes for the reason you mentioned, but I found out later that it can be convenient to have two pieces of about the same brand/model (they will never be exactly the same, like 1saxman also stated).

My main mouthpiece for almost ten years is a 1950's Otto Link STM Florida no USA 10*, but I sometimes (not often, maybe once a year) use my first backup (a Florida no USA 9) when a fresh reed is a bit too hard for the 10*. After it softens a bit I use it further on the 10*. I could imagine other reasons, for instance that you want a bit more resistance and/or power from a bigger tip piece during live gigs (which you normally play with more power than during normal practice or quiet gigs). I don't do that myself, I'm a one piece does it all guy.

You can find some pictures of my collection in this thread:
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...Otto-Link-s)&p=2132764&viewfull=1#post2132764
 

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I have always pretty much played a 7*. But I read about people having different sizes in there MP's so would you buy the same Model Mp (say an STM or V16) in more than one size? If so why?
I once used that excuse, but in the long run, it didn’t matter. I finally realized that I was building a collection, and that’s not for me.

I do have a backup mouthpiece being made/shipped, but that’s it.
 

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Usually I buy a 2nd more open tip if I like the first one and feel like a more open tip would feel better. I also agree with Saxman "Just because mouthpieces are the same make and model doesn't mean that various sizes will play anything like the others, or even that the same sizes will play exactly alike."
Vive la difference!
 

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I don't see owning different sizes of the same mouthpiece as much different than owning different mouthpieces in general. Every mouthpieces has something a little different to offer.

I acquired a Yanagisawa again last year, which I used to play all the time. While it's a nice playing mouthpiece, I don't think it's the best fit for my general preferences with respect to timbre and volume at this point in time. That being said, I'm planning to keep it. It's the most powerful mouthpiece I have, but still not overly bright. Could come in handy.
 

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Yes, but only for spares should my favored pieces go bye-bye. For Soprano, I first used a Selmer Super Session with an I tip until I bought a J tip. So I keep the I as a spare and for test playing horns. I had Ron make me two back-up RPC's for tenor and bari that are close matches to the ones I gig with. The RPC I use for tenor measures .134", while the back-up is a .135". On bari I use a .120", but I believe the back-up is a .130". On alto I have two identical RPC's; both .090".
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all your replies.
I wanted to know for myself so I got 3 more V16's in HR (I own a T7) got a t8,t9,t10.
Then only real difference I heard was that they seemed to get a bit darker as they got bigger. Is this typical?
I really thought they all played the same which surprised me as I thought a larger tip was supposed to be harder to play on?
Was hoping to figure out a tip size to stick with If I spend a lot of money on a vintage MP... but I don't think I figured out to much...except maybe I don't have to be set in one tip size, which does open up more possible deals.
 

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Then only real difference I heard was that they seemed to get a bit darker as they got bigger. Is this typical?
For me, yes. But there is also more versatility to be had with larger tip openings; again, for me.

I had started out on rather closed tips, but when trying more open mouthpieces, it was like a new world and I soon found my true preferences. So my advice would be to pick a favorite, maybe get a back-up if you gig a bit, then get off the merry-go-round and sell or trade what you don't use.
 

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Thanks for all your replies.
I wanted to know for myself so I got 3 more V16's in HR (I own a T7) got a t8,t9,t10.
Then only real difference I heard was that they seemed to get a bit darker as they got bigger. Is this typical?
It really depends on the maker, and whether they choose to compensate the baffle for the change in tip opening.

Tip size: I played an STM 7* in the early ‘70s, then went on a mouthpiece merry-go-round for the last 15 years or so, drifted to larger openings (Lamberson J8 - 0.120”) for a while, and now am back to .105 for tenor. I just got a second one (Phil-Tone “Intrepid” 7*) in the mail since my last post. That’s it for me.

Full disclosure: I still have a couple .090 Morgan C pieces for classical quartet.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For me, yes. But there is also more versatility to be had with larger tip openings; again, for me.

I had started out on rather closed tips, but when trying more open mouthpieces, it was like a new world and I soon found my true preferences. So my advice would be to pick a favorite, maybe get a back-up if you gig a bit, then get off the merry-go-round and sell or trade what you don't use.
Well I have to go back on what I said earlier as the more I play these I find that the T9 sounds the best..or should I say I can play it more versatile. I can make it darker and I can still get the edge out of it. Now the T7 seems to sound thinner and has less volume...
Am I imagining these differences...after all they are the same MP?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It really depends on the maker, and whether they choose to compensate the baffle for the change in tip opening.

Tip size: I played an STM 7* in the early ‘70s, then went on a mouthpiece merry-go-round for the last 15 years or so, drifted to larger openings (Lamberson J8 - 0.120”) for a while, and now am back to .105 for tenor. I just got a second one (Phil-Tone “Intrepid” 7*) in the mail since my last post. That’s it for me.

Full disclosure: I still have a couple .090 Morgan C pieces for classical quartet.
I was wondering about how a baffle would change the outcome. I have only owned 7* baffle Mp's.
I actually have a Jumbo Java T75 and it sounds terrible on the D (4th line) no matter what reed I use. Its buzzy, and static sounding. I'm not sure if its this particular JJ MP or if another T75 would sound the same or a larger one might sound better.
 

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Bob: You may find that two or more versions of the same mouthpiece, even with the same tip-opening, aren't the same. It is because of very small differences throughout the mouthpiece. Manufacturing tolerances have a bearing on this - a simple .001 difference (within the acceptable variances) can make that difference.

Examples . . . I have three Selmer S-80 E and two Super Session E soprano mouthpieces and all of them play differently. I also had three Selmer Super Session J soprano mouthpieces and they all played the same (still have two). With several Morgan soprano mouthpieces in my possession - most of them #7 tips (.070) - all play slightly differently (but all are superb players).

Your original question was about owning the same mouthpiece in different sizes and why. Yes, I have that situation with multiple versions of the same make/model with the same tip-opening AND with varying tip-openings. It took me many years to do that and I've forgotten why I have them all or where I got them (for the most part - I can recall some purchases). Suffice to say I could afford them and I enjoy re-visiting them from time to time. Sure, I have too many choices and probably should cull the herd, but I don't have to do that so I won't. DAVE
 

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I was wondering about how a baffle would change the outcome. I have only owned 7* baffle Mp's.
I actually have a Jumbo Java T75 and it sounds terrible on the D (4th line) no matter what reed I use. Its buzzy, and static sounding. I'm not sure if its this particular JJ MP or if another T75 would sound the same or a larger one might sound better.
Even small changes in baffles can make a lot of difference in your sound. Mouthpieces with very high baffles can become very shrill or buzzy, but reed size, chamber size, tip opening and facing curve all have an impact and all work together.

My advice would be to stick with a piece you like for sound and control. Best is to play that piece that gives you what you want in the most easy way.
 

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Thanks for all your replies.
I wanted to know for myself so I got 3 more V16's in HR (I own a T7) got a t8,t9,t10.
Then only real difference I heard was that they seemed to get a bit darker as they got bigger. Is this typical?
I really thought they all played the same which surprised me as I thought a larger tip was supposed to be harder to play on?
Was hoping to figure out a tip size to stick with If I spend a lot of money on a vintage MP... but I don't think I figured out to much...except maybe I don't have to be set in one tip size, which does open up more possible deals.
Personally I tend to use a lighter reed with a larger tip size. If you do the same that might also effect your sound.
Not being schooled on mouthpiece design, I think that tip size and facing lengths may have a relationship, so that you may enjoy a different tip size with different mouthpieces in part to adapt to differing facing lengths.
 

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I'm not a collector and never have been. I just never wanted to tie up a lot of money in something just to say it was mine and I owned it. Maybe that's because I never really had much money. Things are much better financially now and I could afford to collect instruments or mouthpieces, or cameras, or who knows what but it's just never been who I am.

I do have two RPC mouthpieces and I like both of them because they are so very different. I have a .105 rollover piece and a .115 baffle piece. They are both nice, easy blowing pieces. The .115 is definitely a whole lot louder and brighter. If I ever reached a point where I felt I could play in public, not likely, I'd play that one. Playing in my music room for myself I get all I need from the .105 rollover. Just for fun I put my Yamaha 4C on with a 2.5 reed the other day and I couldn't believe the difference in volume between it and the .105 rollover RPC.
 

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I own multiple tip openings of the V16 mouthpieces that I play on soprano, alto, and tenor- it’s mostly due to wanting to hear and feel the effects of a smaller or larger tip opening on different horns. For example, I really dig the smaller tip opening of A5 and A6 on alto and the T6 or T7 on tenor but on soprano the S6 gets too bright for my tastes whereas I feel Iike I have the same amount of control on an S7 or even S8 which are on the more open side for the V16 offering as opposed to the more closed tips I’ve come to enjoy on alto and tenor. I’ve played a T8-T10 in the past and just felt like I was working way too much, even with lighter reeds. I end up holding on to them just in case I’m ever in a pinch and something happens to my main mouthpiece or I have an advancing student that wants to try out mouthpieces before buying. I also feel like I struggle with being between reed sizes, like a 3 will work great on a 7* for me but gets soft quickly whereas a 3.5 is just way too hard, so that’s what led me to experiment with a 3.5 on a 6* or a 2.5 on an 8*, etc. I’ve read articles that discuss warming up on a very large tip opening and then moving down to your usual tip but I’ve never tried anything like that. Also, the V16s are relatively cheap and can always be sold again!


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