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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a new soprano last week,and really like it.
Though,i was used to a one piece soprano for many years and now this detachable neck is a bit funky to put back and take out! I find it hard also to put it back,and out,maybe it is me,but they are so small.
My case has two choices,you can either put it in there with the neck out,or take a small foam part to have full length straight soprano place,so when i saw that i started leaving the neck on the soprano.
I know that yes i should take it out every time that i use it and wipe,but does it really make a difference?
I should bring it to my tech soon,maybe it does need just an adjustment to be more free!
Any thoughts or suggestions?
Thanks
Regards
Saxobari
 

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Hello,

I am detaching the neck all the times but my case would also allow to keep the neck on the sax.
Does it makes a difference ? I don't know but I'm so used to it from my tenor and bari that I never thought about

BR
Juergen
 

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It probably makes no difference.

Provided you clean it every now and again.

The act of dismounting the soprano neck may damage (if not done very carefully ) the ( rather more delicate than a tenor or alto) octave mechanism.
 

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Personally I think I would grease it up real well and then leave it installed.

If you just put it in there and leave it, it's going to corrode into position pretty quickly. I have had necks get real hard to remove (tenor or baritone) in just a week or two of sitting on the sax stand.
 

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I’ve found that with soprano it seems to be easier to take the neck/mouthpiece off if you grip the neck with a large microfiber cloth that way the pressure from gripping it is more distributed.
 

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The act of dismounting the soprano neck may damage (if not done very carefully ) the ( rather more delicate than a tenor or alto) octave mechanism.
This is why I'd never want a detachable neck soprano. All the ones I've handled, including Selmer, felt relatively fragile in this regard; and it's just one more spot for a leak. So yeah, if one was forced upon me, I'd probably solder it in place and get a longer replacement case.

Altos, tenors and baritones have detachable necks for ease of storage. Sopranos have detachable necks to sell you extra necks.
 

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:) well, I was under the impression that the interchangeable necks were a marketing device in oder to produce one model only to cater for two different users, the people whom want to play straight necks or curved ones, this makes a whole lot easier to produce a sax because, you the player, make a choice.

My former curved soprano (a BW , Yanagisawa clone) had a separate neck but there was NO interchangeability because only a curved neck makes sense on a curved soprano.

This is why I left it on often. Never had any issues with the forming of oxidation by the way! (my horn was bronze but the tenon receiver was brass)
 

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I occasionally lube the tenons on my removable necks, but once lubed, I see no harm in leaving the neck on the horn - for a while. I'd hate to see the neck tenon corrode into the neck-socket. An occasional removal will help.

I've found that by placing my thumb against the structure that guides the upper-octave arm as I apply a twisting motion, that the necks come off easily enough, assuming they've been occasionally lubed. DAVE
 

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I occasionally lube the tenons on my removable necks, but once lubed, I see no harm in leaving the neck on the horn - for a while. I'd hate to see the neck tenon corrode into the neck-socket. An occasional removal will help.

I've found that by placing my thumb against the structure that guides the upper-octave arm as I apply a twisting motion, that the necks come off easily enough, assuming they've been occasionally lubed. DAVE
This. My soprano is the 'tipped-bell' model and it has three necks! Straight, slightly curved and more curved. The case has no provision for containing the sax with a neck attached. Keep the neck collar on the sax and the neck tenons slightly lubed and any neck you use will install and remove easier, plus they 'break-in' over time.

I have to echo the question above of why are you using a detachable neck sax if you use only the straight neck?

Whatever, you grasp the neck with your thumb and forefinger over the top and gripping the fixture that has the pivot rod for the octave key. This gives you a purchase for removing or installing it without damaging the octave key or over-extending it. If it is very tight your tech will probably very lightly sand it so its snug enough to play without tightening the screw. This is the ideal neck fit on any sax, and they all loosen over time.
Meanwhile, you want to use plenty of cork grease on the neck cork because if the mouthpiece is a little tight on it, you have to put the mouthpiece on after you get the neck in and tighten the clamp screw. This usually takes some twisting. If the cork is really too tight you'll have to have that adjusted too.

Normally the sax owner would make small adjustments like this himself but judging by the question itself it would seem you are not mechanically-inclined so you will have to pay somebody to do this. Now if the neck is too loose, that's something that almost no sax owner can handle - we have to take it in for that.

My 'tipped-bell' soprano is a modern Chinese one that I just played on a gig for the first time Saturday night and it went very well. I need to have the two curved necks worked-on because one is too loose and the other is loose until its almost in place, then its too tight. That one will get sanded a little at the top then expanded so its not as tapered and will fit properly.

I'll also repeat the above warnings on leaving any neck in any sax for extended periods - it will jam. I would not trust any lube I know of with the exception of 'Never-Seize' thread lubricant which would be used in this application in a tiny amount spread over the surface of the tenon as well as inside the clamp collar.
 

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I have to echo the question above of why are you using a detachable neck sax if you use only the straight neck?



I'll also repeat the above warnings on leaving any neck in any sax for extended periods - it will jam. I would not trust any lube I know of with the exception of 'Never-Seize' thread lubricant which would be used in this application in a tiny amount spread over the surface of the tenon as well as inside the clamp collar.
1) I am guessing that the OP bought a horn he liked, without considering whether it was a one piece/two piece, and now is asking (quite reasonably, I think) - if the case will hold it asssembled, why bother to disassemble?

2) Yes - Anti-seize - that's what you would use. Nothing else. I wrote "grease" and was thinking "what kind of grease?" and you nailed it. Available at any auto parts store. Don't get it on your pants or shirt, it won't come out.
 

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My former curved soprano (a BW , Yanagisawa clone) had a separate neck but there was NO interchangeability because only a curved neck makes sense on a curved soprano.
There are varying degrees of neck curvature. I have an extra SC992 neck for my SC901 horn, and it's more sharply curved than the original neck. Thus, I now have two options. I don't know whether Yany necks fit BW curved sopranos, but they may.

Also, some people may believe that neck material (brass, bronze, sterling silver) or finish (lacquer, silver or gold plating) makes a difference. This is another reason why some people may want to have multiple necks for a curved sop, even if all the necks have the same dimensions.

Personally, I find it awkward to put a reed on a mouthpiece when the mouthpiece is already on the neck and the neck is attached to the horn. For me, the best method is to (1) put the mouthpiece on the neck, (2) put the reed and ligature on the mouthpiece, and (3) put the neck on the horn. This applies to all my saxes. Thus, I would remove the neck from my soprano after playing even if I had no other reason to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi Dave
That would be a great idea to lube that neck,but what do you use exactly?
Thanks
Mario
QUOTE=Dave Dolson;3787688]I occasionally lube the tenons on my removable necks, but once lubed, I see no harm in leaving the neck on the horn - for a while. I'd hate to see the neck tenon corrode into the neck-socket. An occasional removal will help.

I've found that by placing my thumb against the structure that guides the upper-octave arm as I apply a twisting motion, that the necks come off easily enough, assuming they've been occasionally lubed. DAVE[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #13
One Saxman
I just changed my horn,and before i had a straight fixe neck,and this Yana S992 Bronze just came with two necks,but I like the straight neck,,that is my main reason,,i did nt change horn because of detachable necks,it was just like that.
No regrets,but i don t like the idea of taken it out all the time,specially if it does not hurt the horn!
Thanks for your comment.
Saxobari


UOTE=1saxman;3787742]This. My soprano is the 'tipped-bell' model and it has three necks! Straight, slightly curved and more curved. The case has no provision for containing the sax with a neck attached. Keep the neck collar on the sax and the neck tenons slightly lubed and any neck you use will install and remove easier, plus they 'break-in' over time.

I have to echo the question above of why are you using a detachable neck sax if you use only the straight neck?

Whatever, you grasp the neck with your thumb and forefinger over the top and gripping the fixture that has the pivot rod for the octave key. This gives you a purchase for removing or installing it without damaging the octave key or over-extending it. If it is very tight your tech will probably very lightly sand it so its snug enough to play without tightening the screw. This is the ideal neck fit on any sax, and they all loosen over time.
Meanwhile, you want to use plenty of cork grease on the neck cork because if the mouthpiece is a little tight on it, you have to put the mouthpiece on after you get the neck in and tighten the clamp screw. This usually takes some twisting. If the cork is really too tight you'll have to have that adjusted too.

Normally the sax owner would make small adjustments like this himself but judging by the question itself it would seem you are not mechanically-inclined so you will have to pay somebody to do this. Now if the neck is too loose, that's something that almost no sax owner can handle - we have to take it in for that.

My 'tipped-bell' soprano is a modern Chinese one that I just played on a gig for the first time Saturday night and it went very well. I need to have the two curved necks worked-on because one is too loose and the other is loose until its almost in place, then its too tight. That one will get sanded a little at the top then expanded so its not as tapered and will fit properly.

I'll also repeat the above warnings on leaving any neck in any sax for extended periods - it will jam. I would not trust any lube I know of with the exception of 'Never-Seize' thread lubricant which would be used in this application in a tiny amount spread over the surface of the tenon as well as inside the clamp collar.[/QUOTE]
 

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I see. I guess then you'll have to decide how you want to do it. If you just leave it on after using a protectant like the anti-seize mentioned (get Permatex at Wal Mart or auto parts store) you probably can just forget about it. All you have to do is maybe once a year loosen the clamp screw and rotate it back and forth, then tighten in position. One thing I like about the removable neck is using a stuffer in the body, putting it in from the bell, and putting on the end cap for going into the case. I usually clean the neck by twisting in a piece of paper towel. I don't think there is a stuffer that can go up into a soprano neck so I suppose you'll be taking the neck off to clean the sax so there's no need to remember to twist the neck every so often. The anti-seize bonds to the metal and doesn't wash off- you might never have to replace it. Just put a little of it on a paper towel, wipe the tenon and inside the collar with it and wipe off any excess.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks 1Saxman for your advice.
Much apreaciated .
Regards
Saxobari
 

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… in oder to produce one model only to cater for two different users, the people whom want to play straight necks or curved ones...
Yeah, so both can develop leaks...
 

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I went through all this angst several years ago. Much as I enjoyed many aspects of my Selmer Serie III and Yanagisawa SC-992, in the end it was the removable neck that was an Issue for me.

I have been supremely happy with my Borgani Jubilee bent neck (straight) sop. Great tone, and no Stuff to deal with regarding a removable neck.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Dr G.
Thanks for your comment.
The thing is,yes it is a minor inconvenient,but i just got the horn and quiet happy with it.
It was just a question if leaving the neck on was a problem,and i will not change this soprano because of it detachable neck.Only trying to have a solution,so it is easier when we put it back in the case.
But i understand that for you getting that Borgani was the best.
Thanks again
Mario
I went through all this angst several years ago. Much as I enjoyed many aspects of my Selmer Serie III and Yanagisawa SC-992, in the end it was the removable neck that was an Issue for me.

I have been supremely happy with my Borgani Jubilee bent neck (straight) sop. Great tone, and no Stuff to deal with regarding a removable neck.
 

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Regarding Lube it and Leave it: Anti-seize compounds are for materials that might bond or gall, it does not prevent corrosion. If your neck tenon forms corrosion, be aware that the corrosion products are lower density, and thus expand (compared to metal). In this case, the corrosion would cause the joint of the tenon to bind with increasing compressive stress as more low density corrosion is formed, ie the joint will get tighter with increasing corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi guys
I did put a bit of lube and it really does make it easier to put and take out.
I am also getting use to that horn and neck more and more,so it s not bad takin that small neck after we get few little tricks.
Thanks again for your comments.
My regards
Mario
 
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