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You may have found out (more or less casually) some personal trick that fell apart from the well documented techniques and effects.

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I remember being intrigued by the double-tonguing on the Goodbye Pork Pie Hat (Ah Hum!) sax solo (I think it is John Handy playing that one). At that time - and being self-taught - I was not aware of DT and started to try to emulate that effect with some kind of quick down/up tongue stroke, in a similar way a guitar player would use his pick.

It is a cool effect that is kind of mandolin-like tremolo. Though not well controlled as far as I am concerned: I can barely use it otherwise than on a single note and do not match it with a metronom.
 

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I've heard this technique called "doodle tonguing".
It is pretty hard to control, very uneven.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Doodle tonguing is different to the up/down mandolin type effect. Doodle tonguing is a kind of on/off choking effect on the tip of the mouthpiece reed and iis usually slower.
 

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Pete Thomas said:
Doodle tonguing is different to the up/down mandolin type effect. Doodle tonguing is a kind of on/off choking effect on the tip of the mouthpiece reed and iis usually slower.
Aaaah ! I'll try that today:)
Is there a name for mandolin like tonguing ?
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Not that I know of, like eidollon, I discovered that effect by accident just messing around. I don't think it's used much, and I agree it is extremely hard to control if you want to match it to a tempo.
 

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If I understand the effect correctly I've heard it called "paint brushing". I heard someone doing it, and asked if he was DT-ing, and he said "Nope, just paint brushing"... How serious he was s questionable, but I figure I might as well throw it out there!
 

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When I first attempted to growl, I didn't know how to do it and ended up using my tonsils like I was gargling. While not actually a growl, this technique actually approximates a flutter tongue (which I can't do) very well. You can vary the speed by changing the position of the tongue. It's especially effective on flute.
 

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daigle65 said:
I've heard this technique called "doodle tonguing".
It is pretty hard to control, very uneven.
I've used doodle tonguing. What I find is that it works better on a close tip mouthpiece. On an open mouthpiece, the tongue kinda gets caught in the opening. YMMV
 
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