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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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I recently went on a 20 day tour of Europe with High School Band Students. Although I played in the student concert band on Alto, I really didn't have any time, place, or an instrument to practice. Lots of quality time on a bus. But what I was able to do was to listen to a LOT of music. New stuff, old stuff, I just shuffled everything I in my Itunes (10,000 songs). It was really nice and something I haven't done in a long time.

It feels as though I'm always listening to whatever I need for the next gig or project. It was nice to just listen and remember that I actually like music.

Do other SOTW members designate time for listening - just for the love of music?
 

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Yes, I take an almost daily walk with my iPhone on shuffle and my wireless headphones. I'm constantly amazed at the tunes that come up - stuff that was loaded from various CDs that I'd never listened to, etc. DAVE
 

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Every day. The difference between now and 20 yrs ago is the vast amount of music available. It's great to have the variety at our fingertips but I think it has detracted from the experience of really getting into a particular album. Overload in way. As far as having to listen to something to prep for a gig, I find it tough if it's something I'm not into. Sometimes, after repeated listening and getting my "part" together I'll start to like a song that I didn't want to listen to.
 

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I Program my tablet to play a few hours of music when I lay down to sleep. I sometimes dream of playing with various musicians while I sleep. That puts melodies and solos in my mind for inspiration.
 

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I commute by train every weekend, roughly 10 hours. Music all the way, sometimes my own library, sometimes jazzradio.com, provided the mobile network allows for it. So clearly YES !
 

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I always put my iPhone through the radio in my car and listen while I drive, or through headphones if I'm on a train. Usually if I'm cleaning or sorting through some stuff at home I'll put it on in the background too. It is nice to shuffle everything and see what comes up that I've forgotten about.

Despite having the music on, sometimes I feel like I'm not really "listening" to it though, and I'll occasionally just sit and play a song without any distractions and really listen to the track.
 

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Do other SOTW members designate time for listening - just for the love of music?
Yes, of course. I have about 1,100 digital albums, all of which I've uploaded to the Google cloud, so they're accessible from my phone and any computer. A good chunk of this collection is also on the old-fashioned 80-GB iPod that I keep in my car for listening on the road.

I often listen to music at night by watching YouTube, mostly classical. The amount of material available is mind-boggling, and watching good recordings of live performances is so much more thrilling than just hearing them. I listen to a great deal of classical saxophone music, plus reed quintets, lots of other chamber music, and a constant stream of selections from my favorite composers, such as Prokofiev (watching pianists tackle his sonatas and concerti is amazing), Philip Glass, Bach, Shostakovich, Mozart, etc.

I often enjoy listening to the same composition performed by different instruments. The first movement of the Glass String Quartet No. 3 (Mishima) has been performed not only by string quartets, but also by a saxophone quartet (Amstel), guitar quartet (Dublin), and mandolin quartet. Then there's Asturias by Isaac Albeniz, which people think of as quintessential Spanish guitar music, except that it was actually written for the piano. There's apparently no end to the treatments of this famous composition:
  • Piano
  • Guitar solo (every classical guitarist on Earth)
  • Guitar duo
  • Harp
  • Alto sax solo
  • Soprano sax with piano
  • Saxophone quartet
  • Clarinet solo
  • Violin solo
  • Cello solo
  • Cello choir
  • Cello and harp
  • Accordion!
 

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Crazy question . Of course ! Everyday I'm listening to music .

Not a single day has gone by in the last 48 years that I have not listened to music .
 

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absolutely! When I used to live 30 mins walk from my workplace, it was great as I was able to stick my earphones in and listen to an hour of music each day. Most people hate their commute, but I loved it. Unfortunately our office moved an it's a 2 hour walk now, so I have to go by motorbike. Still find time to put music on though - mostly when the girlfriend is out, so I can have it nice and loud! Quiet often have the radio on quietly when we go to sleep too.
 

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I think the OP is asking about listening to music when NOT driving, jogging or other activities, but simply listening. It seems very few people (non musicians) listen to music as a primary activity even tho' there is more music then ever available.
 

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What's interesting is sometimes as I am listening to several different cuts of a song that l/we are working on is you stumble onto an artist that just blows me away , to answer the question I try to make time to do nothing but listen music evryday
 

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I have music on a LOT. I work in IT so when I'm not in meetings/managing my guys & actually doing some programming, I'll have my cans on and music on, likewise in the car, or when home cooking and whatnot.

But actually sitting down and listening? Not so much anymore, which is a bit sad. But time comes into play; work and an 11 month old mean there just isn't enough hours in the day (including for practise) to fit it all in.

One of the things I enjoy about the TOTM threads is that it forces me to listen fully to what the guys are playing, in order to give some feedback. That's probably the most active listening I'm doing, alongside attempts to transcribe some Keith Jarrett stuff to arrange for a community band.
 

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I think the OP is asking about listening to music when NOT driving, jogging or other activities, but simply listening. It seems very few people (non musicians) listen to music as a primary activity even tho' there is more music then ever available.
precisely my reading.

Do other SOTW members designate time for listening - just for the love of music?
I remember, once upon a time, we all seemed to be doing less things and do them more intensely.

We all took time to do one thing at the time and do it well.

Reading and lListening to music or studying were activities that one did purposely let alone sleeping, one at the time, in a proper place. Multitasking was a word that didn’t exist and if it was done was involving other things, like work, than reading, listening to music or things like that.


Things appear to be very different nowadays, There is not enough time in a day to do all the things that we have to (do we have to?) do.

I am guilty as charged though.


I often listen to the music while doing other things ( right now I am listening while I wrote) which obviously detracts from paying the due attention to listening to the music as much as the other things that I am doing.

There is a profound difference between listening with purpose and to casually fill the silence with music.

You know what’s Horror Vacui or Kenofobia?

It’s the fear of the empty space (on in this case of the aural dimension) it applies to anything and generally is the symptom of a deep uncertainty which causes the response to fill the nothing ( dangerous because from the nothingness could come out anything ) with something (you put it there so you know what it is).

Much better to pause and listen (quality time dedicated to music or reading) rather than mixing things up . Have you ever read a phrase and realized that you haven’t read it and re-read it because it never crossed the surface of your attention? NOw think of how much you do this when you listen “ casually” and without purpose.
 

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hearing music while you do something else is not the same as listening.

might produce effects even if unaware of it but to me the act of “ listening " to music (as in paying attention to it, let alone respect ) is not compatible with sleeping or driving or working. You may very well have heard it but you haven’t listened to it.

please if you are interested in finding out more, follow this link

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/dont-listen-music-while-studying-david-cutler

“....Perham says, he found that reading while listening to music, especially music with lyrics, impairs comprehension. In this case, it's spoken lyrics, not acoustical variation that impairs productivity.

"You've got semantic information that you're trying to use when you're reading a book, and you've got semantic information from the lyrics," Perham says. "If you can understand the lyrics, it doesn't matter whether you like it or not, it will impair your performance of reading comprehension.”

https://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/PressRelease/pressReleaseId-79057.html



Although music can have a very positive effect on our general mental health, music can, in the circumstances described, also have negative effects on cognitive performance. Perham remarks, “Most people listen to music at the same time as, rather than prior to performing a task. To reduce the negative effects of background music when recalling information in order one should either perform the task in quiet or only listen to music prior to performing the task.”
 

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I never listen purely for enjoyment. I only listen to learn something. I think it's a casualty that started in music school, when everything we heard was to be analyzed -- so that's the only way I can listen these days. Which to me is a plus, because I'm only listening to learn something anyway, whether solos, new tunes, screening as many versions of a song I want to write a chart on as I can find, whatever the purpose. It can be a negative too -- if there's music playing in a restaurant or department store, it's almost all I can hear, it's pretty distracting when it's not something I want to learn from.

When I was living on tour buses, I'd listen to music that I wanted to learn. There is always a queue of stuff to learn, it's not like I need to listen to discover them. I kind of already know what they are, and I'd say regardless genre and idiom, but I admit that most of what's going on these days is not something I'm interested in learning. I suppose that's a negative. If I hear something in passing that seems interesting, I'll dive in a bit and learn something about it.

Is that weird?
 
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