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Discussion Starter #1
I was doing long tones the other day and was very very sharp, for no reason, out of the blue.
I figured it was just a bad day but then switched to a new reed (I use Java Red 2.5 on tenor) and was right back in tune.

Is this a known thing or just a coincidence I am seeing?
 

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For me, it's less that dead reeds play sharp because they're dead and more because it's easier to bite a soft (dead) reed. I become conscious of two things when my intonation suddenly gets squirrely: (1) oh crap, this reed is dead and needs replaced ASAP; and (2) don't bite, don't bite, don't bite - corners in, jaw down.

I know that there are some on the forum who suggest practicing playing in-tune with too-soft reeds as an exercise to help cure a biting issue. Not that I'm calling you a "biter" (I'm guilty, though).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Funny I just bought a box of 3s thinking the 2.5s might be starting to get too soft in general. Thanks!
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Yep, the reed will affect how you are able to play in tune. I actually did not believe this until I got a tuner app on my phone and started using it in practice as well as gigs. Just now listening to a live CD of my main group and hearing how the trumpet is playing flat but I am pretty much centered, even on rides. You just don't always hear this stuff live which is why you should always record - you can do it economically with a Zoom.
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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Yeah, Reeds become less consistent and bordering on unpredictable when they're old, worn out, and tired...just like us humans.
 
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