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Discussion Starter #1
Do Mauriats still have QC / workmanship issues?

A few years ago I tried four Mauriat tenors, and they had some of the worst workmanship I have ever seen. Significant key height issues, visible-to-the-unaided-eye leaks, mechanical slop both with post alignment and swedging, marring to the brass underneath the lacquer, flaking lacquer, and I even recall a bad solder joint on one of them, all right out of the box.
I saw another two altos and a tenor at a store about a year and a half later (still a few years ago) that were every bit as bad.
They were not a newly established company when I tried these horns, but as I said, it's been a while.

Has P. Mauriat resolved the problem since my experiences with them?

I'm not considering a horn purchase; I'm simply curious.
 

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strange but I have a completely different experience. It is true that Mauriat underwent a change of distributorship in the US ( which doesn’t excuse the faults but may explain why the things were not caught upon arrival in the US prior to distribution this to the shops , and doesn’t explain why the shops didn’t send back the horns and refused to put them for sale , which to me should be the norm in any case).

The company has gone through much in more than 13 years of activity, but I can’t believe that if that were the norm they would have lasted that long. I have bought and sold an excellent Nickel Silver alto, and tried several tenors of several, series 66 and 76 , and never noticed sloppiness but indeed, every now and again there was someone complaining of some things and some time ago I have alerted the owner (who is a member here) to solve a problem with one American Imported P.Mauriat which was the object of a long thread a few years ago.

I just took a look at the threads about P.MAuriats the overwhelming majority shows positive review, there was notably also a review by Stephen Howard negative about a 66 I believe.
 

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The 66R I owned from 2008-2012 was really, really good. No idea what you're seeing but...
 

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maybe looking at the other part of the glass :)
 

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I cannot say that I have seen most of the things which you describe in the OP to that dramatic a degree.....but having worked on a few over the years, generally....I am not particularly impressed with their precision, when one considers their price point. There's certainly far worse, but there are better, too....
 

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The 66RUL that I own (and its one of the older ones from like the late 2000's) has been just fine.
 

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The title of the thread imp-lies that it is common knowledge that the instruments have workmanship issues.

I'm not sure where that comes from, all the P. Mauriats I've played seem to be very well made.

Obviously after shipping there may well be some set-up required, which would be the responsibility of the retailer most likely.
 

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would this be a good person to ask about his 7 years with P.Mauriat horns?

Hey everyone. Some of you may know me already, but in case you don't, my name is Matt Stohrer and I repair saxophones for a living. Soon, I will be a P. Mauriat dealer in addition to a saxophone repairman. This will be a long post, so I will break it down:

1. Introduction, how and why I became a dealer
2. Explanation of my setup process
3. Suggestions, questions, comments

1. So I'm Matt Stohrer. I learned how to repair saxes on 48th St. in NYC (no, really!), I recently moved to Raleigh NC, and I post frequently in the sax repair section of this forum. I have my own website, but I am building a completely new one in the background- one with a shopping cart, a blog, a better gallery, a better layout, and no flash. I'm doing it myself, and it should be up in early June. People seem to like my work, and I have a reputation as an honest, reliable repairman and dealer. I haven't sold too many saxes myself in about the past 8 months as I've transitioned from living in NYC to living in Raleigh NC, but I have been doing a lot of work for Getasax.com.

I am going to be going out on my own soon as an independent saxophone repairman and dealer. Some of you may have seen the epic Sam Ash/Mauriat thread here on SOTW a while back- long story short, a customer of Sam Ash in FL was very unhappy with a situation regarding his recently purchased Mauriat, and after exhausting his local resources he was recommended to send it to me when I was working at Sam Ash in Raleigh. Working together closely with St. Louis Music, Mauriat's US distributor, we brought the issue to a succesful conclusion and the customer walked away happy. During my time working the St. Louis Music, I became impressed with Craig Denny's breadth of knowledge and depth of genuine care of the instrument, and I would venture to say he felt the same. We kept in contact, and when I left Sam Ash, we decided that we would like to continue working together and that I would be Mauriat's first dealer in North Carolina.

Although I will be a relatively small-time dealer, my relationship with the distributor and the distributor's keen interest in taking care of the end user make it possible for me acquire any of the horns and necks that Mauriat offers- and while being a small-time dealer and saxophone repairman, I can offer a level of service that will be hard to find anywhere else. I am the shop owner, repairman, customer service manager, and shipping department. I only do saxophones, and I love what I do.

I also hope to be deeply involved with the Mauriat saxophone itself- plans are gestating for me to visit the factory, which will be saxophone factory #3 for me!




2. I will be offering what I believe to be the the most thorough and thoughful new saxophone setup found anywhere- and those of you that know me know I am not given to hyperbole, so this is a statement I take extremely seriously.

The following is a quote from the "philosophy" page on my new website:

"In an era of factory-direct service, of almost infinite choice of merchants on the internet, I strive to make the value of doing business with me stand apart from my competitors. I take more time and expend more effort to make sure that working together is good for both sides- because at its best, business improves life for everyone involved in the transaction.

This is what I believe in, and this is how I do business."


I will be doing a MONSTER setup on each Mauriat I sell- and each setup will be specifically tailored to the player buying the horn. When you purchase a horn through me, we will have a long and detailed conversation about your playing style, your likes and dislikes musically, how you play, how you learned, your feelings about the horn- your whole story. The more I know you, the more I can make your saxophone play like an extension of you. This setup will easily be the most in-depth on the market, and yet my prices will be the same as everyone else.

Here is a quotation from my "New Saxophone Setup" page on my upcoming website that goes over the process in detail:

"When you purchase a new saxophone from Stohrer Music, you can rest easy knowing that your saxophone was given the same extremely thorough setup procedure that I would give my own saxophone.

This is not a promise I make lightly, as it often involves over a full day of work, per saxophone. And yet, my prices are the same as my competitors.

First, the saxophone is carefully unwrapped, inspected, and playtested. Any manufacturing mistakes or damage means I send it back. Only once I have determined that the saxophone is a worthy example of the instrument and something I can stand behind does the actual work begin.

I start by completely disassembling the saxophone- every key comes off the instrument. All rods, hinge tubes, pivot screws, and pivot receivers are carefully and painstakingly hand-cleaned, removing the oil and pivot grease from the factory. Rods are checked and straightened if necessary, and all posts are checked and aligned straight and true. Fit and finish is checked on all keys, and every key is made to be absolutely free in its movement with no slop, binding, or sponginess.

Next, all springs are retensioned to your specifications. Not only resistance but directional precision is required- and while it seems like a trifle, there is much to be done here. The difference between a decent spring job and a good one is the finesse that comes with care and experience, and it is a difference you will feel. Your saxophone will feel smoother, and the springs will exert a more constant pressure on your fingers, removing the gummy feel so often felt when springs are sub-par.

After the saxophone is completely clean and all moving parts are functioning within exacting tolerances, the saxophone is re-assembled stepwise in the same manner as in one of my overhauls. As each key goes on, superior quality synthetic oil is added, ensuring a long-lasting layer to protect the bearing surfaces and provide years of whisper-smooth action. Each key is checked for leaks, and every leak is individually corrected. All adjustment materials are checked, and upper and lower stack adjustment corks are replaced with a long-wearing and stable synthetic material, improving not only the firmness and snappyness of the action but the longevity of the adjustment.

Finally, the horn is exhaustively playtested. Only when I am satisfied that I am selling a top-flight professional instrument carefully adjusted to your personal specifications will it be carefully packed and sent fully insured to you, where you can rest assured that the horn will be ready to take gigging the night you receive it.

I provide warranty service for one year from purchase at no extra charge, and every horn purchased from me gets a lifetime 20% discount on my repair services."



3. So, there is what I am starting with. Does anybody have any comments, suggestions, questions? I'd be interested to hear what you think of my setup process, and whether you would like to see anything added. I am serious about providing the best value on the market, and I will take any and all suggestions under strong consideration. I would be particularly interested to hear from Mauriat owners who have a lot of playing time on their horns- what sort of things do you think a repairman such as myself could do to make your experience better out of the box?

Also, what horns do you guys like? I was considering making my first order a 67RUL (unlacquered, rolled tone holes) alto, a 66RUL (unlacquerded, rolled tone holes) tenor, and maybe a soprano or another alto or tenor, and maybe a neck. As time goes on, I will be reinvesting in my business and would like to expand my selection. I imagine I will be getting my first horns in early to mid June- and I haven't ordered them YET, so if you are looking for a Mauriat and would like to get one, your horn can be the first one I get! Starting off with a sale or two would enable me to reinvest and start offering a wider selection.

I also have the idea that maybe I could get an unengraved horn from the factory and have Jason Dumars go absolutely nuts on it...

I will be ordering my first couple horns sometime soon- and of course if you are interested in getting a horn and you'd like to do it through me we can make it happen.





Well, thank you for reading this novel of a post and thank you in advance for offering any advice or input! I am excited to become a dealer of what I believe is an excellent saxophone made by people who care and by people who listen to feedback and strive to constantly improve their product. I hope that if you are considering buying a Mauriat, you will choose to do so through me.
 

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The 66RUL that I own (and its one of the older ones from like the late 2000's) has been just fine.
Great to know that you are still enjoying the Mauriat that I sold to you! I had the issue that it was way too easy to play a G an octave down when the octave key was pressed.
I believe that you resolved the issue by fixing a leak in the neck receiver or by refitting the neck tenon to better fit the receiver. Overall I thought it was a good horn with a nice, beefy low end and a robust sound throughout. The keywork is not as precise as a Yani or Yamaha but it is not bad. The Mauriats I have seen for sale near me (I tested several about a year ago at the Navy Band Sax Symposium at George Mason) were impressive.
 

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Did P Mauriat have known workmanship problems? Ever?
So. You create a thread ripping a brand for workmanship issues you saw years ago. You aren’t in the market or in any way currently testing said Saxes for any particular reason. A search of tens of thousands of other posts on this forum finds not a whole lot of people, if any, share your opinion. What’s your point here?
 

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It has been discussed prior. I have seen Mauriats with tone hole issues thia year.

Stephen Howard, noted UK repair tech, has also published his recent findings on Mauriats with workmanship issues. Notably the rolled tone holes having significant problems. The recent examples I have seen also have included very sloppy key mechanisms in addition to tone hole problems.

- Saxaholic
 

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most reputable companies in australia have stopped stocking these saxophones.
i rang around and all said there were issues on nearly every saxophone once they changed where they were made.
the early ones were supposedly good horns for a cheaper price.
i was asked by mauriat if i wanted to buy some of their saxophones,thats why i did the ring around.
i declined after speaking with many saxophone businesses.
 

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most reputable companies in australia have stopped stocking these saxophones.
i rang around and all said there were issues on nearly every saxophone once they changed where they were made.
the early ones were supposedly good horns for a cheaper price.
i was asked by mauriat if i wanted to buy some of their saxophones,thats why i did the ring around.
i declined after speaking with many saxophone businesses.
I had an early 76 tenor. The keyword was soft and a brazed-on key touch or two were out of alignment. Sold it and bought a Viking: a decision I have not regretted for even a single day.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Re: Do Mauriats still have QC / workmanship issues?

The title of the thread imp-lies that it is common knowledge that the instruments have workmanship issues.
I'm not sure where that comes from, all the P. Mauriats I've played seem to be very well made.
Obviously after shipping there may well be some set-up required, which would be the responsibility of the retailer most likely.
I was under the impression that it was at one point common knowledge. The players I talked to then who had experience with Mauriat - employees at at least three stores (incl. Chuck Levin's), as well as numerous local players I know - all had similar misgivings about the brand. Some other forum members had criticisms too as I recall.
I was the first person to handle three of the tenors after their trip across the Pacific. A tech would have fixed the leaks in the setup (and should have before I got there...), and the fourth tenor had minimal issues in that department. However, even the leaks and mechanical issues were so severe, there is no way they weren't there when the horn left the factory. And one of those horns should have been thrown out by QC before it even got to being lacquered, let alone being shipped.

All of that said, my experience was about five and a half years ago now. A lot can happen in five years; I am asking for current opinions because mine is not.
 

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I don’t understand how the distributor would perform NO check up prior to give the horn to a shop.

I would expect any distributor to open any parcel from overseas, check upon arrival the saxophone or trumpet, then repacking and give it to the shop (and discard any faulty instrument or correct any fault ), then I would expect any shop to do exactly the same.

Occasionally we read of people placing faulty horns on display. The customer comes in finds out they are not playable and walks out and these days voices his complaints on line.

Who would want that? Bad publicity ( which would come in loads and for free) is the worst that you can do after you spend so much trying to create good one.

Would any shops selling clothes or shoes put something on display that is clearly broken?

Accidents can happen anywhere but quality control is not only a factory thing, it goes down to shop and distributor too.

Anyway it would be impossible for any company having the kind of bad QC that is implied here to have made it that far and have made such a name for themselves on the Sax market. Would all the buyers AND sellers be masochists with so much choice around?
 

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Occasionally we read of people placing faulty horns on display. The customer comes in finds out they are not playable and walks out and these days voices his complaints on line.

Would any shops selling clothes or shoes put something on display that is clearly broken?

Accidents can happen anywhere but quality control is not only a factory thing, it goes down to shop and distributor too.
And yet people will love to bash the brand without considering that chain of QC.

Unplayable horns in shops can be due not only to lack of checking and setup by the retailer, but also damage while being play tested.

A couple of examples:

1. I was trying out horns at sax.co.uk and keilwerth was clearly not playing properly. leIt would not have been put on display like that and that is exactly what I was told, ie very often customers roughly handle instruments. They are often on their own in a private booth, where they could pop it and then just sheepishly hand it back to go back on display.

2. There was a Selmer baritone I tried at Frankfurt Miusikmesse, I quite liked it. I went back four days letter and it was unplayable below F.

No, of course we don't blame Keilwerth or Selmer - but you could argue they are responsible for regularly checking instruments on display.
 

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I don’t understand how OP can have opened the boxes before the tech at the shop or at the distributor unless he was the tech of the shop.
 

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I was trying out horns at sax.co.uk and keilwerth was clearly not playing properly. leIt would not have been put on display like that and that is exactly what I was told, ie very often customers roughly handle instruments.
Will that horn be sold as "new"?

Some players want to try out the exact horn that they would buy, which effectively makes every instrument in the retailer's inventory into a demo model. But why should someone else pay the new price for a sax that, as in your example, has been abused and then fixed?
 

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...of course we don't blame Keilwerth or Selmer - but you could argue they are responsible for regularly checking instruments on display.
As you know I’ve worked at the Frankfurt fair.

When the company I was representing went there with a technician ( who was also partner in the company) he adjusted the horns on display every morning. Our Chinese neighbors did the same every day too.

But this is a trade fair where people manhandle instruments just because they are there ( and often time they are sold at the end of the show as demo instruments at demo instruments prices ).

I have personally witnessed in shop the idiotic behavior of people wanting to test instruments and mouthpieces but then asking to have one never used before (which is ridiculous because we all know that there will be individual variations which is part of the point of testing something).

Anyway, no shop should have any musical instrument for sale that hasn’t been at the very least inspected if not play tested.
 
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