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Discussion Starter #1
Do any pros use the new yamaha 62 tenor?

I'm using one right now as loaner. I really like it. thought the 4C mouthpiece is too small of a tip.
 

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Do any pros use the new yamaha 62 tenor?

I'm using one right now as loaner. I really like it. thought the 4C mouthpiece is too small of a tip.
I know one pro playing a 62 tenor. Personally I think think they cost too much for what you get. You can pick up a used custom Z or custom 875 for a grand less, or better yet, an old Buescher Super 400 or Conn 10m. I really don't see any reason to buy a new saxophone, other than just being attracted to shiny objects.

I love my Buescher Top Hat tenor. Fantasically well made horn, and the altissimo reg just pops right out. I bought it for $1200 and I've put maybe $300 worth of work into it so far. I wouldn't trade it for a YT-62 or even a Custom Z. I also own two 10m's and, I like the tone even more, but the action isn't as good as the Buescher 400, and the altissimo register is very tricky on the 10M.
 

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cool. Who might the pro be? No pressure -)

I have noticed that new horns play better and have better response (CRISP) - generally speaking- at least that has been my experience. Could be psychological. though.
 

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I know one pro playing a 62 tenor. Personally I think think they cost too much for what you get. You can pick up a used custom Z or custom 875 for a grand less, or better yet, an old Buescher Super 400 or Conn 10m. I really don't see any reason to buy a new saxophone, other than just being attracted to shiny objects.

I love my Buescher Top Hat tenor. Fantasically well made horn, and the altissimo reg just pops right out. I bought it for $1200 and I've put maybe $300 worth of work into it so far. I wouldn't trade it for a YT-62 or even a Custom Z. I also own two 10m's and, I like the tone even more, but the action isn't as good as the Buescher 400, and the altissimo register is very tricky on the 10M.
From my personal experience.....
YTS-62 - best action and ergonomics on the planet
Conn 10M - worst action and ergonomics on the planet.
 

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cool. Who might the pro be? No pressure -)

I have noticed that new horns play better and have better response (CRISP) - generally speaking- at least that has been my experience. Could be psychological. though.
Have you played a Super 20 with a fresh setup? Or a Buescher Big Big? Those can be mighty fine if well set up.
 

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From my personal experience.....
YTS-62 - best action and ergonomics on the planet
Conn 10M - worst action and ergonomics on the planet.
I have never played a YT-62, but I hate the ergos of modern horns including Yamahas, especially that modern Mark VI style LH pinky table. That rocking Bb and G# especially has done permanent damage to my left hand muscles \ tendons. I find them to be rather clunky too. Yanigasawas have fantastic ergos and action, but I still prefer the old Conns and Bueschers. If you think the 10M has the worst action and ergos on the planet then you've never played one, or at least never played one in good shape. I find them to be quite nimble and so free blowing they practically play themselves. You want to try bad ergos and action try a vintage Martin. They had the best tone by far IMO, but I've never played one that didn't wear out my fingers fast.
 

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cool. Who might the pro be? No pressure -)

I have noticed that new horns play better and have better response (CRISP) - generally speaking- at least that has been my experience. Could be psychological. though.
Local pro, no one you'd have ever heard of. He isn't all that happy with it either. But he has to have a shiny, modern sounding horn for his regular gig.
 

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I have never played a YT-62, but I hate the ergos of modern horns including Yamahas, especially that modern Mark VI style LH pinky table. That rocking Bb and G# especially has done permanent damage to my left hand muscles \ tendons. I find them to be rather clunky too. Yanigasawas have fantastic ergos and action, but I still prefer the old Conns and Bueschers. If you think the 10M has the worst action and ergos on the planet then you've never played one, or at least never played one in good shape. I find them to be quite nimble and so free blowing they practically play themselves. You want to try bad ergos and action try a vintage Martin. They had the best tone by far IMO, but I've never played one that didn't wear out my fingers fast.
Interesting perspective, and I certainly respect your opinion. I had a Martin Committee III and a Conn 10M at the same time last year and I found the Martin to be a lot easier to play. I also like the VI style keywork the best. Our hands must be different models!
 

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Interesting perspective, and I certainly respect your opinion. I had a Martin Committee III and a Conn 10M at the same time last year and I found the Martin to be a lot easier to play. I also like the VI style keywork the best. Our hands must be different models!
It's my opinion that all the big horn makers were competing to make their own professional keywork systems, and for whatever reason Selmer's system won out, probably because of their rotated lower stack system, and their inferior pinky table got picked up along with it because everyone was so excited about the Mark VI. I greatly prefer the Conn 10m and Buescher 400 pinky tables to the wacky Mark VI system. The Conn and Buescher systems do not hurt my pinky, the Selmer system does. I will agree that the rotated lower stack is highly superior, but that's where my liking for Selmers (and all their modern imitations) ends. The Buescher 400 has something going on with the posts being higher or something, making them very fast and nimble to play. I fly on my Top Hat tenor, and it has a rich, full vintage tone that rivals my 10m's. But there's something about that big, resonant Conn tone that just feels perfect. The Martin sound is my favorite though, warm, dark and haunting. I have never played a Committee III. I feel like I have to get one now to see if it's the Martin I can play.

I do own a Mark VI tenor and it was my gigging horn for 20 years. Last few years it's been sitting in the closet though, in favor of my Buescher TH&C.
 

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Do any pros use the new yamaha 62 tenor?

I'm using one right now as loaner. I really like it. thought the 4C mouthpiece is too small of a tip.
The yts 62 02?, the 62 is the most sold pro level horn ever. However, I would go for a used 82z than a new 62, just for economic reasons. Theres som many pros who use the 62 series alto, sop, tenor and bari, way more than the Selmers, talking globally.
 

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I know one pro playing a 62 tenor. Personally I think think they cost too much for what you get. You can pick up a used custom Z or custom 875 for a grand less, or better yet, an old Buescher Super 400 or Conn 10m. I really don't see any reason to buy a new saxophone, other than just being attracted to shiny objects.
I don't think you can compare the cost of a new horn to the cost of used ones.

Used Z's are flying around at about the 3K+ mark. While Used 62's are around the 2K mark.

I have a student who is playing one. I liked the key work a lot. And the sound wasn't bad. But it didn't have the depth and layers that my 61 has.
 

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Oh man, if you haven't tried a Committee III you need to give it a shot. That's some seriously luscious tone you have yet to experience!!
 

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I don't think you can compare the cost of a new horn to the cost of used ones.

Used Z's are flying around at about the 3K+ mark. While Used 62's are around the 2K mark.

I have a student who is playing one. I liked the key work a lot. And the sound wasn't bad. But it didn't have the depth and layers that my 61 has.
Must be a regional difference. I've seen several used Z's going at the $2K-2500 mark. I've never played a 62 but I'm not surprised their used price is so low, when their new price is around $3200. Makes me wonder where hey are being made. Are they being cranked out at a non-Yamaha plant and having the Yamaha name slapped on them?
 

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Oh man, if you haven't tried a Committee III you need to give it a shot. That's some seriously luscious tone you have yet to experience!!
Man, now I really want one :-(

I really need to sell some tenors before I can even consider buying another one. I currently have 5 pro tenors and I rarely even play tenor anymore. Is there a 12-step program for saxophone addiction? :)

My tenors:

1935 King Zephyr
1946 Conn 10m - silver plate
1948 Buescher Top Hat and Cane (my preferred gigging horn)
1951 Conn 10m (really love this one)
1967 Selmer Mark VI (143XXX)
 

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I wouldn't say that about the Yamaha custom horns at all. They are as top notch as ever.

Something has changed though over the years with the 62 though. All the "improvements" seem to have taken away from the magic of the earlier horns for me.

All the modern 62's I've played (3) have all been very consistent but not really anything to write home about.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've played on this newer 62 tenor now for about 20 hours. I really like it. It is fun to play- can't wait to pick it up in the morning.

I'm still using the 4c mouthpiece and I'm wondering why the piece sounds so good and its only a $30 mouthpiece! I still think I'd need a 5 tip at least though.
 

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I picked up a used YTS-52 as a backup/outdoor horn, and I like it quite a bit. I have been told it's almost a 62 but without as much engraving/fancy stuff. Anybody want to weigh in on that?

Anyway the tone is nice, the intonation is good, and the ergonomics are nice.

I wouldn't mind playing it as a first horn either, but my custom MacSax has a bolder tone, which is what I like for the pop/blues music I make a living with.

BTW, I'm a pro player, music is all I do for a living.

Insights and incites by Notes.
 

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Regarding the new 62, they're still great horns. I'll second the notion that they're too much out of the factory. Buy one used, and get it overhauled. It'll play better than most horns from the factory.

I have never played a YT-62, but I hate the ergos of modern horns including Yamahas, especially that modern Mark VI style LH pinky table. That rocking Bb and G# especially has done permanent damage to my left hand muscles \ tendons. I find them to be rather clunky too. Yanigasawas have fantastic ergos and action, but I still prefer the old Conns and Bueschers. If you think the 10M has the worst action and ergos on the planet then you've never played one, or at least never played one in good shape. I find them to be quite nimble and so free blowing they practically play themselves. You want to try bad ergos and action try a vintage Martin. They had the best tone by far IMO, but I've never played one that didn't wear out my fingers fast.
Goes to show just how individual opinions on ergonomics can be. I do think that the modern take of the VI is much clunkier than what the VI ever was. Actually, I picked up a Conn 60M tenor a few months back. It's essentially a cheaper made 10M with some... rather interesting ergos. After a few minutes, I was really beginning to dig the feel of the horn. Very easy horn to play too. Actually, I'd probably buy one of these as a spare horn for the right condition and price. Total 180 from my SA80 in terms of feel, but not terrible at all.
 

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I have never noticed whether the lower stack is offset or not in trying out various horns. I think that's why we have swivel joints in our wrists, hands, elbows, etc.

I totally agree with you on the Selmer LH table design. I personally believe it was designed according to a theory that the finger movement of all fingers should be the same, which disregards both the strength differences among fingers and the special function of the LH little finger which has to operate four keys three of which require significant actuation effort.

I also theorize that the direction of operation of the Selmer style mechanism is derived from the desire to move the bell keys to the right side of the horn while having a direct action, which requires you to have the pivot on that side (opposite from the older style). Once you make that design decision, a lot of other things have to follow in order to make the thing work - for example, you can't put the low Bb in line like Conn, because the lever arm would be too short. So you have to put it below, requiring the little finger to move sideways against considerable force, which is not anatomically ideal. And so on.

I have written a bunch on this website about this and won't repeat any more of it here. I do have to admit that a very large number of players prefer the Selmer style, so clearly there is room for adaptation and differences of opinion, but ever since I started playing I have always felt instantly comfortable with the Conn layout and instantly uncomfortable with the Selmer layout - worst of all with the tilting low Bb.

I do know a guy who plays a Mark 7 and has actually had the tilting low Bb soldered in place and the link removed so it's a non-tilting low Bb. He's also a huge bruiser of a guy with hands like bunches of bananas, which is about what you have to be to be able to play a Mark 7 tenor.
 
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