Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been told that dizziness occurs when playing flute because of my embouchure hole being to open. How do you develop a flute embouchure? I'd imagine obviously playing would, but are there any exercises as far as muscle development?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
Joined
·
7,133 Posts
That dizziness usually lasts no more than 3 weeks. It's a matter of getting your air stream more focused. Think about making your air into a very thin beam of air. Almost like a lazer. all your air should be hitting the flute hole, with no scatter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
That dizziness usually lasts no more than 3 weeks. It's a matter of getting your air stream more focused. Think about making your air into a very thin beam of air. Almost like a lazer. all your air should be hitting the flute hole, with no scatter.
Would this be done by making my embouchure hole smaller and pointed further down?
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
Obviously Galway's embouchure works very well for Galway
But he says "The smiling embouchure is no good".
Of course the term "smiling" can mean many things, including non-grumpy-looking, but there are many accomplished flute players with some sort of smiling embouchure.
Everybody's lip and mouth configuration is different, and I fail to see why he is dismissing all those accomplished players, who have found what works for them.
See http://curryflutelessons.blogspot.com/ These are all "highly accomplished musicians".
The original publication, Artistic Flute, by Roger S Stevens, has descriptions associated with each embouchure.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
5,160 Posts
We always recommend sitting when practicing for our beginners the first few weeks. This is absolutely normal and will resolve itself without much fuss. Try not to overthink this one. Little kids just get on with it without worries.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
5,386 Posts
I had to be careful my first few monthes on flute. I'd be playing a tune at my convalescent hospital gig and I'd get dizzy/ hyperventalated. So I'd sit down and stop for awhile. As others have said i was blowing too much air with more of a flat line embouchure. Its taken years of long tones and overtones but my tone is much better and all the air problems went away. MY embouchure aperture is more rounded and down stream /I think of it as blowing through a small stirring straw. very small and focused. But trust me , your dizziness will go away. Flute is wonderful isn't it? K
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,780 Posts
I had to be careful my first few monthes on flute. I'd be playing a tune at my convalescent hospital gig and I'd get dizzy/ hyperventalated. So I'd sit down and stop for awhile. As others have said i was blowing too much air with more of a flat line embouchure. Its taken years of long tones and overtones but my tone is much better and all the air problems went away. MY embouchure aperture is more rounded and down stream /I think of it as blowing through a small stirring straw. very small and focused. But trust me , your dizziness will go away. Flute is wonderful isn't it? K
Does it also have to do with head/neck position i.e. too far forward?
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
When I am playing well, my head position is irrelevant. I move the flute with my head.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
When I am playing well, my head position is irrelevant. I move the flute with my head.
It is the position of my flute with respect to my head/lips that is relevant.
Head position is more pertinent to preserving a painfree neck, shoulders, etc.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top