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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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Very cool! The entry-level be a tech course they just had looked incredibly interesting as well. I wish I’d heard about it sooner and made some plans to go.
 

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they appear to be hydroformed necks a process championed by the Taiwanese industry ( on Taiwan there is great experience with this due, for example, to its application in many metal industry related products ) and certainly not used by the French one.

I don’t know whether the Seles are hydroformed but the Selmer necks were never ( and probably still aren’t) hydroformed.

Hydroforming is very precise but it is an industrial way to produce metal tubing.

The expensive molds that are needed ( you would need one for each model of necks that you seek to make) and high pressure machines are of course something you would need to buy after you have learned how they work in the workshop. That’s how, the idea of doing this in a garage on week-ends (which I associate with the concept of DIY) looks jusrt a little less likeley that setting up a proper high tech mechanical shop.

I would be very surprised if anyone attending this workshop could replicate the results without first buying a lot of very expensive equipment .:whistle:
 

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by your own hands?

This is a different type of tubing but that’s how hydroforming works.


 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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they appear to be hydroformed necks a process championed by the Taiwanese industry ( on Taiwan there is great experience with this due, for example, to its application in many metal industry related products ) and certainly not used by the French one.

I don’t know whether the Seles are hydroformed but the Selmer necks were never ( and probably still aren’t) hydroformed.

Hydroforming is very precise but it is an industrial way to produce metal tubing.

The expensive molds that are needed ( you would need one for each model of necks that you seek to make) and high pressure machines are of course something you would need to buy after you have learned how they work in the workshop. That’s how, the idea of doing this in a garage on week-ends (which I associate with the concept of DIY) looks jusrt a little less likeley that setting up a proper high tech mechanical shop.

I would be very surprised if anyone attending this workshop could replicate the results without first buying a lot of very expensive equipment .:whistle:
+1....not exactly sure how this is "DIY"....it's interesting for sure, one could probably learn a lot about fabrication and specification; but basically all this is is a demo of how MM makes their own necks. One would never tool up their garage to try this....
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Discussion Starter #11
+1....not exactly sure how this is "DIY"....it's interesting for sure, one could probably learn a lot about fabrication and specification; but basically all this is is a demo of how MM makes their own necks. One would never tool up their garage to try this....
Fair ‘nough.

How ‘bout, instead, a week of carving a wooden neck with Paraschos? As my imagination goes wild, I envision an octave key that looks like a small bird pecking at the octave pip.

Similarly, one might better be able to make wooden mold halves, and embrace the Kim Bock approach of forming two pieces to net shape, and then soldering together the assembly.
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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You’re right guys, better go find that whittling course because a week learning about all things necks with the added bonus of trying to make your own isn’t worth the price of admission.
 

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the neck making process is rather secretive one.

MM is opening some of it to the public but I can’t believe that there will many of the attendees whom will make necks for fun at home.
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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Milandro, You always know all of the answers to every question. That must be quite a burden for you to carry around.
 

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Looks like it’s just making an alto neck anyway.
 

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Fair ‘nough.

How ‘bout, instead, a week of carving a wooden neck with Paraschos? As my imagination goes wild, I envision an octave key that looks like a small bird pecking at the octave pip
Now I’m having a vision of Maxwell on a seesaw, thanks.
I see you as more of a carbon fiber type of guy.... Or maybe a nice piece of Teak.
Coast to coast road trip? I have friends that live on Hilton head. Short commute.... have to wait for my wife to get back from Boston. She’s hidden all the bike keys.
 

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100% will do when I win the lottery. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #18

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Well, if you look at the business aspect, necks are the in thing these days. But I don't see this as the sort of thing that was truly inspired by a desire to educate other techs in the industry to learn how to compete with MusicMedic making necks. More like a cash-grab from hobbyists to the tune of a grand for the experience and maybe ending up with a VI tenor neck; though of course not guaranteed.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well, if you look at the business aspect, necks are the in thing these days. But I don't see this as the sort of thing that was truly inspired by a desire to educate other techs in the industry to learn how to compete with MusicMedic making necks. More like a cash-grab from hobbyists to the tune of a grand for the experience and maybe ending up with a VI tenor neck; though of course not guaranteed.
Yes. Not unlike taking a cooking class - a great experience, but no guarantee of success. I have, however, made some wonderful red chile recipes for five course meals.

https://www.lascosascooking.com/cookingclasses.aspx

Then there is the CIA: https://www.ciafoodies.com/california-copia/
 
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