Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This theme has been occasionally coming up and I could find an ancient thread which had gone sideways about it.

So I decided to open a new thread after having found a page where a Dutch repairer Daniël Daemen (who quotes as inspiration source Sascha Schalken another Dutch repairer ) talks about his pad making.

I have to say the instructions are rather short, so , probably there will be space to elaborate if someone has more experience.



Daniël Daemen says:


“.....
Hi everybody,
I’m very excited making my own saxophone pads!
Thanks to excellent repairwoman Sascha Schalken who is doing this for years.
She was kind enough to share her knowledge with me!


It’s quite a challenge to do this and very rewarding. The biggest benefits are that you can choose which kind of leather to use, make the correct size to fit the key cup perfectly, choice of density of the felt, and another big advantage is that you can determine the thickness of the pad. I’m experimenting with leather which is not treated with silicone, because that is the reason why pads stick. So finally we can say goodbye to sticky pads!
Saxophone pads consist of 4 parts. Cardboard paper, woven felt, leather and a resonator as you can see in the pictures.
The pad will be glued in the pad cup with shellac or hot melt glue.I’m not quite sure how this new process of pad making will evolve. But all other pads I use (Rigotti Deluxe, Saxgourmet Kangaroo, …) will always be available.Hope you enjoyed this post, Daniel..."




5488
5490
5491
5492



here you find a video, in the beginning of which Nico Bodewes, another Dutch repairer, makes his own pads (we have pads in the NL but 3 repairers make their own albeit occasionally or not)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,348 Posts
Sounds like an activity to do when there is nothing else to do. There are so many pads available out there already made. I'm not sure why anyone would make their own pads these days. I equate this to making your own shoes when there are shoes readily available. What is the advantage?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
the world is a place for many needs , in the past other people have brought this up too,




if there are 3 technicians in a tiny country with 17million people making their own pads, I am sure there are more, around the world.

Most people don’t repair their own saxophone either but lots do
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dave Dunn

·
Registered
Tenor, alto, Bb Clarinet, Flute
Joined
·
2,151 Posts
The tech who restored my 1830 clarinet made his own pads for it. Not exactly 1830 vintage materials. He used neoprene for the cushy part and wrapped that in teflon. It works. The clarinet plays nicely. I'm not sure why he chose to do it that way but he has a great reputation for restoring ancient instruments. For years he specialized in building handmade baroque flutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Making ones own pads will certainly be appealing to some and provide a great deal of satisfaction - to some. I am tempted by the idea myself but would rather spend my time honing my maintenance / repair skills at this point. The option of choosing leather colour also has great appeal as has been discussed here previously. For a recent repad of a Hohner alto I chose Claripads - handmade in Germany - which are just fine.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
this video show another , different take in making pads or rather modifying some, I am aiming at creating a reference for those interested in this process.



another video, with a similar approach as the previous in some regard, in modifying and restoring an existing pad
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
another video
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Thanks for posting this - I really appreciate this kind of pursuit, and even more so when strictly speaking you don’t have to do it at all.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My pleasure. it may allow people to use their own color of leather , some people , we have been told, would like to provide the original color leather on Dolnets and other saxophones which had red or like Grassi green pads , it can be done this way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
Thanks for posting this Milandro
I find the "remake saxophone pads at home" the most interesting
seems a good job and not very difficult, using the key cup as a guide and as a holder is very useful for a precise diameter
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think there are many ways to skin cats ( :unsure: to make pads? :eek: ) and make pads some time ago someone suggested to make a “ mold” made of different sizes tubes or circles but apparently this is not always necessary.

Also, the pads are an area where probably there was the largest effort to improve over the many many years since the first saxophones

Recently a shop in the Netherlands came up with a new material which seems to have all the advantages of leather and no disadvantage ( it is supposed to be non stick and also softer in sound when opening and closing)...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Fun but I wouldn't do this myself.
I bet it's really hard to get them as flat as the premium pad makers make them.
And the time it will take to make them will be too much for most tech to be worth it. It would be a significant loss in time and money.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
well, again, the shop I mentioned has now a laser machine with wich they do all kinds of things but also cut the pads off this “ new” material ( new to the saxophone apparently this was already used in the automotive industry)



Prestini, makes pads, by hand (as most pads are made, in a process that isn’t dissimilar fro other videos



Another shop making their own clarinet pads

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Although of course it is a personal choice whether one wants to do this oneself, arguing that it is somehow not a sensible choice is failing to consider the wide variety of contexts in which the decision might be made. Leaving aside those whose time is not worth much money, there is also the huge explosion in 'luxury' craft we are seeing today. More and more people are willing and able to spend money for luxury quality in pens, watches, knick-knacks, gewgaws. It is inevitable that in the saxophone world, which is already riddled with expensive gewgaws, handmade pads would be a thing.

For those planning to do this though I should think the real challenge would be identifying the best materials. There are so many different tannings of leather, so many mystery felts of unknown quality, so many different characteristics in terms of handling moisture and so on, finding out what is really best and sourcing it, to me, seems the greatest challenge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Thought-provoking. Cardboard/felt/leather is certainly not the only way to make a saxophone pad, and perhaps it is not really the best option. First you practice making them in the currently-accepted method, then you test potential refinements...which could lead to significant improvements. Better pads for everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
Totally, well almost, off topic, but...many yrs. ago, while I was touring Britain with the Kitsalino Vancouver Boys Band, a clarinet pad came off and a Brit came to the rescue with an orange peel! Worked fine for the concert. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dave Dunn

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
Joined
·
18,512 Posts
Totally, well almost, off topic, but...many yrs. ago, while I was touring Britain with the Kitsalino Vancouver Boys Band, a clarinet pad came off and a Brit came to the rescue with an orange peel! Worked fine for the concert. :)
What kind of orange ????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
It was Knavel.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
40,434 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thought-provoking. Cardboard/felt/leather is certainly not the only way to make a saxophone pad, and perhaps it is not really the best option. First you practice making them in the currently-accepted method, then you test potential refinements...which could lead to significant improvements. Better pads for everyone!

this may very well be but one of the problem is market acceptance of new technologies. The saxophone is one of the first products of the industrial era, it still uses at least two materials of the pre-industrial age, cork and leather that have been adapted through the years but never, fundamentally, changed.

Some may argue that there are good reasons to do that and probably there are, however, there may be other ways to do things ( I have another thread about the replacing of neck cork with other technologies, the most promising of all being O rings).

I have a friend whose day job is with Satellites, who has been thinking of “ alternatives”and , who knows, one day may come up with some ideas.

All the past alternative ideas have failed, but that doesn’t mean that they will always fail.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top