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Discussion Starter #1
What got me started on this was that I bought some mouthpieces off of ebay, and they arrived without ligatures. I have a garage full of "stuff", and while a string-ligature was just fine for trying out these mouthpieces, I wanted to try my hand at what you'll see in this thread. I had all the tools, had the webbing, so the total cost was < $10. Most backpacking and outdoor stores sell polypropylene or nylon webbing. The whole thing took me about 2 hours.

Anyway, let's get started.

Here's what you need.

View attachment 216296

A dowel...about 1/4 inch wood.
A #8 machine bolt with a #8 wing nut
Needle and thread of whatever color makes you happy
A hand drill and a selection of small drill bits. (not pictured)
A nail and a way to heat it up.
8-12 inches of single-layer polypropylene or nylon webbing
a fine toothed saw, like a hacksaw or a fine blade on a coping saw.
 

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The first thing to do is to mark your dowel. The webbing is 1-inch wide. Be a little generous, make your marks more like 1 1/8 inch apart. The saw blade will eat up some material and you might not get things centered perfectly the first time (I didn't!)

View attachment 216298
 

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You're going to make a dot right smack in the middle of each section, and drill a hole through the dowel. ---two holes, actually. I recommend drawing a dot exactly where you want your hole to be, and then taking a nail and tapping it into the wood a little bit. The dent you make will help your drill bit stay where it's supposed to be. Drill your holes BEFORE cutting the dowel...much easier.

View attachment 216300
 

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I used a countersink to "indent" one of the holes. That way the head of the bolt can sit in there and not stick up so much over the surface of the dowel.

Now assemble your dowel pieces with your bolt and wing nut...marvel at your ingenuity. ---then take it apart!

View attachment 216302
 

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Now you need to melt a hole in the webbing, right in the middle of it. Take the webbing and wrap it around the dowel and eyeball it...try to figure out where you're going to need this first hole. Now you're going to heat up a nail and use it to melt a hole in just the right spot.

How do you do this? Well, I used a little propane torch to heat the nail but I've done it before by holding the nail in a candle flame with a pair of pliars. I've also put a nail on the burner of my kitchen stove, turned the stove on "high" and waited a few minutes. Once it's hot, the nail will go right through the webbing.

This does generate some stinky fumes so you might want to take this part of the project outside.

View attachment 216306

Now, stick the bolt through the hole and fold over the webbing. Hand stitch it down, so that it wraps tightly around the dowel. NOTE, you're going to want to have the excess webbing pointing about 90 degrees from where the bolt comes out. Don't stitch it such that the excess webbing sticks straight out on the opposite side of the dowel, from the bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Now comes the tricky part. You have to put the whole thing on your mouthpiece and eyeball exactly where to put TWO holes in the webbing, right where it wraps around the other piece of the dowel. Once you've got that figured out, heat up you nail again and melt TWO holes in the webbing, so that the bolt can go through it. Use the needle and thread to stitch it down.

Trim off any excess webbing...maybe use a match to burn/seal the end of the webbing so it doesn't fray.

VOILA! DIY ligature! View attachment 216304
 

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Very ingenious indeed, and a real testimony to your DIY skills. In uncertain terms this is nice.


However, it looks like the paradigm why do it the simple way when we can do it the difficult one?

Unless one is desperate to have a ligature for a size that one cannot find or one lives in a very far away from any shop (or mail order) it is going to take a lot of effort and time (which I suppose one would have in a remote location) to build this whil you can simply get yourself a Rovner. But maybe is because I am envious of your DIY skills.

Well done anyway.
 

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sure but it is also hardly an “ emergency” solution because it would take a while to make.
 

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Thanks for sharing! Had I not already found a lovely knockoff that works well, I would be doing this. Like you, I already have all the bits and bobs except the #6.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I could in fact buy a Rovner ligature.....for about $47. There's no question that the Rovner, even the Chinese knockoffs of the Rovner are sleeker than my first attempt, here.

Again, the total cost of materials, if you have the tools, will be <$10 to make this ligature. EVerything is available at Home Depot, Lowe's or your local hardware store, pretty much for sure. Next time I will use a #6 bolt and #6 wingnut, and use a slightly smaller dowel, as the ligature is pretty big. It took me about 2 hours to make this. "Two hours" might be more time than some folks want to invest. Personally, I enjoyed the process.

I'll say that I liked the sound of this ligature on that Rico Metallite M9 tenor mouthpiece better than the sound I got with a string ligature, but that's just me.

Besides, you can make these in any color you want, that's available from the backpacking or marine store. West Marine Products carries single-layer colored polypro in black, white, green, blue and red. Every outdoors store, even Big 5 sports carries black webbing.
 
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