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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son is a developing juggler and is taking part in a Middle School talent show. I assembled a set of nylon mesh gloves with 1 mW diode lasers on the back side of each finger's second joint. Combined with a set of illuminated juggle balls and a bubble machine in a dark room, the effect is awesome. It would be even better with a fog machine, but the school has imposed certain limits LOL.

Anyways, I have tried out these gloves while playing the saxophone. Very cool. The more sporting showman out there playing clubs where smoking is permitted may well be interested in this effect.

New laser pointers with exhausted batteries may be obtained very inexpensively on eBay. I connected the lasers to a three (3) cell AA battery pack (Radio Shack) with flat computer cable. Total cost is less than $30 US.
 

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Thanks for a great idea in such an earnest world.

The more I think about your gloves the more fun they seem! It would be even more fun to be able to switch them on and off discreetly. Possible, do you think?

H
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Harry. This is Irv.

I mounted the battery pack on the "back of the hand" part of the glove and dislodge the center AA cell to turn it off. Each glove has its own battery pack. My son has not thrown the batteries out of the pack yet during his practice.

It would be possible to provide a central location for a battery pack to power both gloves and to provide a switching location, but I firmly believe in Occum's Razor and strive for the simplist solution to every problem.

I did a web search for laser gloves after I designed mine and found that a MIT student made up a set for an independent study project a few years ago. It looks like he stuffed some laser pointers into latex gloves and had at it.

From his article, it appears that if the pointers were sweeped over a body profile in a dark room, a viewer's eye would see an topographic projection of the form. I haven't tried that yet.

When a laser beam shines through a soap bubble, two dots appear on each bubble. When the laser beam strikes a tangent of the bubble surface, the whole surface of the bubble is illuminated. Obviously, this all happens very quickly. But when you have a lot of bubbles generated from a bubble machine, it is quite an effect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My son finally had his Middle School Talent Show performance on juggling skills. He concluded the "act" with illuminated balls and the laser gloves in a blacked out hall.

He had a great time up there and I was laughing so hard my glasses fogged.

A battery did come out at first (nerves?) but did not cause a problem for him. I had no idea the illuminated balls would be so bright when eyes were adjusted for the darkness.

The Principal wisely wanted the gloves out of the "Green Room" after my son's act to avoid problems with the curious.

It must be wonderful to feel the energy of the hall going with you while on stage. It was a great night.
 
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