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I want to try a Selmer III tenor. I thought I would just pop on my Otto Link or Rousseau that I use on a Conn and play it. They are both too big. What do I need to look for to get a proper fitting mouthpiece, or am I missing something?
 

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I want to try a Selmer III tenor. I thought I would just pop on my Otto Link or Rousseau that I use on a Conn and play it. They are both too big. What do I need to look for to get a proper fitting mouthpiece, or am I missing something?
get the horn recorked or wrap paper around the cork to increase the diameter
 

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Its just an evil plot against sax players. Selmer uses very thin cork on their new horns. They fit their mouthpieces great but thats about it. Unless you are going to play a mouthpiece that fits it just get new cork if you buy it.
 

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get the horn recorked or wrap paper around the cork to increase the diameter
Or sometimes, if the cork is just compressed, you can expand it by applying heat. I boil a pot of water and put the part of the neck with the cork in the water and then quickly pull it back out. If you leave it in too long, the cork might pull away from the neck. Some people just wave the cork back and forth through the flame of a lighter instead.
 

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I've actually had the opposite problem. The cork appears thin, but my Otto Link fits extremely tightly around the cork. I need to force it down in order to be in tune. The C*, however, fits fine (maybe a little snug).


It may be because I have a Ref. 54.
 

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Really? Are you talking about a metal Link or a New Vintage Link.

If its a metal link you got an oddball either in your C* or the Link. They typically are much, much different in size. The New Vintage HR piece has a pretty tight shank.

Then again, you have a picture with an alto...Im referring to the tenor neck. When I ordered my Selmer I told the shop to change the cork before sending it because I already had played them with and experienced their super thin corks.
 

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... or it may be that all mouthpieces and necks all have slightly different diameters -- which is my personal experience.

If it's a problem for you and you change a lot between different pieces, you could always by another neck or 3 to fit each mouthpiece you're intending to use.
 

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Dont force it too hard or you will crack the shank either putting it on or pulling it off. Sounds like your cork should be sanded a little. If the all your mouthpieces are too snug you are ahead of the game. Its when they vary by large amounts that you cant find a happy medium. Sanding a cork is not rocket science. Id use some painters tape to protect the metal near the cork just in case. It doesnt take much sanding to make a difference.
 

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Well, on these new horns, they always have that metal ring before the cork. I'd assume to protect that too. I'll have to try it out.
 

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I did mine by taking a piece of painters tape and covering it.

You are going to be doing light sanding. No belt sanders involved here. If your not comfortable your tech should do that really really cheap if he knows you. Or the shop you bought it in.

Personally, I did my own because Im OCD and I didnt figure anyone would be as careful as me.
 

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... or it may be that all mouthpieces and necks all have slightly different diameters -- which is my personal experience.

If it's a problem for you and you change a lot between different pieces, you could always by another neck or 3 to fit each mouthpiece you're intending to use.
That's it - there is no 'standard' for mouthpiece shank bore inside diameters or sax neck/cork outside diameters. You're okay when you test a piece with a bigger bore than your cork is set for because you can make a temporary 'bushing' out of Teflon plumber's tape. When the piece bore is smaller, you have a problem. In order to play it, you must fit the cork to it. Mouthpiece makers play around within a certain tolerance for the shank bore, because it provides an easy way to increase or decrease total volume of space inside the piece. The old Brilhart Level Air was big inside and it was a straight bore all the way to the ledge at the end of the baffle. We called it the 'shotgun' mouthpiece because of that long, straight bore. It doubtless had some effects on playing/tuning.
 

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I want to try a Selmer III tenor. I thought I would just pop on my Otto Link or Rousseau that I use on a Conn and play it. They are both too big. What do I need to look for to get a proper fitting mouthpiece, or am I missing something?
To just try mouthpieces out you're going to have to use some paper to get the bigger ones to fit. Us mouthpiece makers didn't all get together and decide on one size just like we didn't all get together and decide to make all of our facings all the same size. It just cracks me up when folks call or write me and want a #6 or 7 because that's what they use but the mouthpiece they use when they call me is very different than what I sell.

Even if they get the exact same size tip opening, the chamber dramatically determines the resistance so you should factor that in too. If you're not sure what to get than call me and I'll help you and you don't have to buy one of my mouthpieces to get my help. Nevertheless no mouthpiece, even if it is one of mine won't improve your sound more than Joe Allard's tone production exercises that I put up on SOTW occasionally or on my blog. Phil Barone
 
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