Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I’m looking for a book where I can practice intervals including diatonic triad interval half step approach.

The only one I found with intervals is Viola but doesn’t have diatonic triad half step approach.

Thanks,

Filippo
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,919 Posts
I’m looking for a book where I can practice intervals including diatonic triad interval half step approach.

The only one I found with intervals is Viola but doesn’t have diatonic triad half step approach.
What is diatonic triad half step approach?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,087 Posts
Is this maybe about half step approach chords?

http://decipheringguitartheory.com/posts/half-step-approach-chords/

“As their name suggests, half-step approach chords are chords which approach another chord either from a half-step above, or a half-step below. Typically, the approach chord will be the same type of chord as the chord it is approaching, for example, a minor seventh chord will approach a minor seventh chord, while a major seventh will approach a major seventh.”
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,919 Posts
Is this maybe about half step approach chords?
I don't think so. Yes I know about the guitar thing, but that is not diatonic (ie in the key of C, G#min to Amin is chromatic). It is also a way to play fretted chords (or whammy bar chords) so no relation to practising intervals as the OP suggests.

So I'm still at a bit of a loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,087 Posts
I don't think so. Yes I know about the guitar thing, but that is not diatonic (ie in the key of C, G#min to Amin is chromatic). It is also a way to play fretted chords (or whammy bar chords) so no relation to practising intervals as the OP suggests.

So I'm still at a bit of a loss.
Then this maybe?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=i5ToMgscW3I
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,015 Posts
I don't know if that's what the OP is after, but I like it. I have to figure out what he's doing, though. Not sure about it just from that one listening.

Just as a general rule, I'm not sure you need a book or anything written out. If you have a specific concept that you want to work on, why not figure out how to do it and practice it by ear? I would think that would yield a more useful result. Then again it may be helpful to write it out or read it at first, but get away from the sheet music asap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
I think it's along the lines of play a triad, from the 3rd note go either up or down a half step and play that triad. Suppose you have a C Maj. chord in one bar, and an F in the next. Play C-E-G-Gb-Bb-Db and resolve to C in the F chord. Or C-E-G-Ab-C-Eb and then resolve to F somehow. It's not the way I think about it, but I suppose it works, depending on the sounds you're after. You could invert the triad, like C-E-G-Ab-Db-F.
 

·
Just a guy who plays saxophone.
Joined
·
3,578 Posts
I don't know if that's what the OP is after, but I like it. I have to figure out what he's doing, though. Not sure about it just from that one listening.

Just as a general rule, I'm not sure you need a book or anything written out. If you have a specific concept that you want to work on, why not figure out how to do it and practice it by ear? I would think that would yield a more useful result. Then again it may be helpful to write it out or read it at first, but get away from the sheet music asap.
Books are great if you don't have your own ideas. I think if most people took the step of singing (or playing) and transcribing their own ideas, as you mention, they'd realize they already know a bunch of really useful vocabulary and can spend countless hours of building technique and training their ear using their own words. Not to knock any of the many great method books out there, but unless they're hitting on completely foreign concepts (to you, the player buying the books), they're just (quite literally) putting words in your mouth. I get bored when I'm listening to players and I can call out exercises they just regurgitated on stage. If anything is killing jazz or making jazz players all suck (Branford article thread...), it's the academic approach to all being checked off for playing the same thing proficiently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hey Pete,

On G major diatonic triads I would play, G B, A C, B D, C E and so forth.... I would like to practice half step approach notes on those triads so I would play F# G B, G# A C, A# B D, B C E ...

Trying to get more familiar with those approach notes.. Steve has a great book on approach notes, but those are mostly licks. Before mastering those, I was thinking of practising them playing triads.

I hope that helps.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I don't know if that's what the OP is after, but I like it. I have to figure out what he's doing, though. Not sure about it just from that one listening.

Just as a general rule, I'm not sure you need a book or anything written out. If you have a specific concept that you want to work on, why not figure out how to do it and practice it by ear? I would think that would yield a more useful result. Then again it may be helpful to write it out or read it at first, but get away from the sheet music asap.
.

I was thinking of a book because “easy” keys like G and C I can figure them out but as I get to those keys more complicated (DB!) my head starts spinning :). I know what you may thinking, I should learn in the hard way without cutting corners ahah
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,305 Posts
Incorporating Garzone's approach would make it sound less pattern based (for better or for worse). Example: running 8th notes, playing random diatonic triads in C major in random inversions. Each triad connected by a half step or two.
 

·
Just a guy who plays saxophone.
Joined
·
3,578 Posts
Incorporating Garzone's approach would make it sound less pattern based (for better or for worse). Example: running 8th notes, playing random diatonic triads in C major in random inversions. Each triad connected by a half step or two.
I had no idea it was a Garzone thing, but it’s fun to take the root triad C, E, G, and add a second triad of your choice and work them up through the inversions. Doesn’t sound like a pattern and you can play any triad you want...as long as you don’t mind stepping out in a sensible way. Ex using diatonic:
C major + d minor
C E G, D F A, E G C, F A D, G C E, A D F (no B), C E G...you can also go up/ down or down/ up to get stepwise movement.

Ex using a non-diatonic:
C major + D major
C E G, D F# A, E G C, F# A D, G C E, A D F# (no B), C E G...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,937 Posts
I’m looking for a book where I can practice intervals including diatonic triad interval half step approach.

The only one I found with intervals is Viola but doesn’t have diatonic triad half step approach.

Thanks,

Filippo
Check out “The Serious Jazz Practice Book” by Barry Finnerty for exercises such as these.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,793 Posts

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,793 Posts
Hey Pete,

On G major diatonic triads I would play, G B, A C, B D, C E and so forth.... I would like to practice half step approach notes on those triads so I would play F# G B, G# A C, A# B D, B C E ...

Trying to get more familiar with those approach notes.. Steve has a great book on approach notes, but those are mostly licks. Before mastering those, I was thinking of practising them playing triads.

I hope that helps.

Thanks
I'm not sure I have this pattern but I have a ton of patterns like this in all keys in my book "Mastering Major Diatonic Patterns". I go through a ton of diatonic scale patterns and some of them have half step approaches also. Steve
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top