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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, after 15+ years of experience playing saxophones and over 20+ years playing clarinets I started to double on flute. I have great teacher with vast knowledge, but recently I started to experience some diaphragm area pains similar to soreness. Did anybody of you experienced similar feeling? I have always thought that I am using the diaphragm in a proper way, but I observe that saxophone and clarinet tones improved greatly when I am transferring the "flute breath support" to saxophone.

Any input will be greatly appreciated.

Best regards,
Szymon Łukowski
 

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That sounds like what I went through with my flute teacher who is very skilled. I thought I was doing everything pretty well but she showed me so much more about how to use the diaphragm and it was less than comfortable and natural feeling.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Hi folks, after 15+ years of experience playing saxophones and over 20+ years playing clarinets I started to double on flute. I have great teacher with vast knowledge, but recently I started to experience some diaphragm area pains similar to soreness. Did anybody of you experienced similar feeling?
Get medical advice now. We are not qualified to equate any similar symptons that may or may not be related.

That said, I doubt that "proper" diapghragm brreathing can have side issues if you follow the procedure as laid out by a good teacher, so even more reason to get this diagnosed by a medical expert.

I'd hate for anyone here to say "oh yes, I got pains due to lower lung breathing techniques, it's normal don't worry" and then you miss some other issue that could be due to some serious (or hopefully less serious) medical condtion.

For example I used to get abdominal pain/soreness. I saw a doctor and following tests she advised dietary changes. That sorted it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I will have a few days off during the Christmas time and check it out after this break. Hopefully it's only just some overwork thing, I had 5 days of gigs in a row (Including packing, carrying and all that stuff) so I think it's contributed to my feeling. I will let you know as soon as I will get it solved.
 

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Hernia do to lifting saxophones? ;)
Having studied advanced breathing with an opera singer for better flute tone, mezzo soprano, nothing she taught caused any issues. :D
Cat scan from neck to groin, as we age and wear, is prudent.
Flute can wear out the shoulders a wee bit but not as bad as bicycle crashes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's definitely not hernia, rather I think I've been working so hard during flute practice sessions last week. It is much better now.
 

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Many people, including teachers, refer to the the abdominal muscles (in the front of the stomach) as the diaphragm.
I don't know if this is the case for you, but that is not the diaphragm.
The diaphragm is a more or less horizontal sheet of muscle (actually dome when relaxed), more or less level with the bottom] of the ribs
AFAIK It does not send any sensation to the brain.

A pain in the stomach area could be from excessive use of the abdominal muscles from forced exhalation or blowing up a pile of water balloons, or hernia, olr diverticulitis, appendicitis, or gut obstruction, or a whole host of other things. If it concerns you for goodness sake see a doctor.
 
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