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it's called growling where you growl with your throat while playing the note. there are many videos on YT about how to do it.
on top of it, Dexter rolls his fingers down the scale to make that descending effect. he does it first without the growl then again while growling.
 

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Yes, That鈥檚 the r-r-r-r-r-olling R type of growl versus the hum type achieved by audibly humming a pitch while playing.
 

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Right - usually (at least in my experience) people call it a growl when the player hums while blowing, while a flutter tongue is...well...what it sounds like. So they're two very different techniques.
Both are referred to as the two types of growls, especially in jazz groups. I've found most people who call it flutter tongue (and not a growl) are from a classical background.
 

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Both are referred to as the two types of growls, especially in jazz groups. I've found most people who call it flutter tongue (and not a growl) are from a classical background.
Ok, just sharing my experience, which is not classical by any stretch. Regardless of nomenclature the techniques are very different and understanding that makes a big difference in what matters - playing them.
 

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Well, flutter tongue is making the rolled "r" sound (think of the Spanish letter rr) while playing. Growling is vocalising while playing - whether an actual pitched hum or just a general "growl" type vocalization.

Flutter tonguing and growling can sound similar, but flutter tonguing is much more raucous, also less controllable. Growling can range from just the slightest roughening of the tone to a very heavy effect.

The actual physical techniques are quite different; the names reflect the technique. Doesn't have anything to do with classical or jazz.

I listened to the referenced song and at 5:13 I clearly hear a brief, very well controlled - flutter tongue - NOT a growl.

Listen to Arnett Cobb below, the chorus starting at around 2:10 is all growled. One of his signature techniques. Note how it's not individual flutters, it's an overall thickening of the sound.

 

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Flutter tongue with growl, into a fall. Kind of odd to do that in a ballad like that.
 
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