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How long would it take for a Selmer Paris Super Action 80 Series II to lose its lacquer and acquire a patina naturally?
 

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How long would it take for a Selmer Paris Super Action 80 Series II to lose its lacquer and acquire a patina naturally?
Do you play it?

If you play it enough, it might wear off in a couple decades. But then again, if you play it enough it won’t matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How long would it take for a Selmer Paris Super Action 80 Series II to lose its lacquer and acquire a patina naturally?
Do you play it?

If you play it enough, it might wear off in a couple decades. But then again, if you play it enough it won’t matter.

Yes, I play it daily. The serial number is 483800 if that’s any help. I think it was manufactured in the 90’s.
 

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Yes, I play it daily. The serial number is 483800 if that’s any help. I think it was manufactured in the 90’s.
Good for you.

As to how soon it will lose the rest of its lacquer: Consider that there are still a great many horns from the 1950s (and earlier) that still have most of their lacquer. The newer Selmers, such as yours, have a more durable lacquer than previously.

Enjoy your horn and don’t wish for the early demise of its finish. Selmers have always been beautiful horns to play as well as admire.
 

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I just ordered a new tenor, because I can not stand my modern un-lacquered tenor's stink and mildew. I may stick in the back yard for the tree rats, so they can used it for shelter.
 

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it’s a little bit of zinc loss nothing serious if you can't stand it it will clean up with something abrasive.

I'd leave it alone.

Your horn will take decades to lose its lacquer and it will only do that in the areas where touches your clothes or your body. the rest won’t come off, you may want to deface it, at great cost, and have it delacquered and its value will go down the drain because of it.

If you like the look, buy yourself a horn with that kind of finish. Some take well to this but others look like ****e showing various degrees and types of oxidation and dirt.

But some folks DO like the Rat look.
 

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Could this be the lacquer degrading or something else?
It looks like the neck was stored in the bell or similar without protection. Nothing to worry about.
 

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OP, is this lacquer loss something you want to occur, or something that you're worried will occur? Either way, there's no such thing as a half-life for a saxophone finish. You can't predict exactly how many years -- or decades -- it will last.

The lacquer on the SA80II alto that I owned for several years (sold it a month or so ago) was fantastic. It still looked brand-new after 15-20 years of life, and I played the horn regularly. I also wiped it off regularly and placed it back in its case regularly. :)
 

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The more hours you spend touching and playing it, the faster it will lose it's lacquer. Get back to playing.
 

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I just ordered a new tenor, because I can not stand my modern un-lacquered tenor's stink and mildew. I may stick in the back yard for the tree rats, so they can used it for shelter.
If your horn stinks and has mildew, I have news for you.......it has NOTHING to do with it being unlacquered. I play two horns full time with zero lacquer and they don't stink or have "mildew"........anywhere.
 

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If interested, you can check here: https://www.roadwarriorsaxophones.com/ the website if a work in progress but you get the idea.

That's if you want to spend $. But you get a beautiful 'instant patina" ...very nice looking! with new engraving (optional) and well, probably an overhaul by Emilio...if you want.

See if you have any spare change behind the sofa cushions...
 

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If your horn stinks and has mildew, I have news for you.......it has NOTHING to do with it being unlacquered. I play two horns full time with zero lacquer and they don't stink or have "mildew"........anywhere.
When I am working with brass to do some plumbing, I notice a characteristic smell. I notice the same smell on my hands after working on a tarnished, unlacquered sax.
I also think certain types of brass corrosion has a distinctive smell. Different horns will develop different types of corrosion.
Different people notice different smells.
 

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If interested, you can check here: https://www.roadwarriorsaxophones.com/ the website if a work in progress but you get the idea.

That's if you want to spend $. But you get a beautiful 'instant patina" ...very nice looking! with new engraving (optional) and well, probably an overhaul by Emilio...if you want.

See if you have any spare change behind the sofa cushions...
I’ve seen the FB video of this.
What do you use to protect the brass or does whatever you use to de-lacquer add the protection at the same time?
Or is a secret KFC recipe?
 

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Whaler
That's a good question.

The person is an acquaintance friend of mine and I keep meaning to ask him about it..

I believe its not truly 'raw' in that there is protection built in viz the process; to what degree I don't know. I would ask that question thru the website email, but, he has no email set up there...just a phone number!?

If I was making any real dough, I'd do it!
 

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If your horn stinks and has mildew, I have news for you.......it has NOTHING to do with it being unlacquered. I play two horns full time with zero lacquer and they don't stink or have "mildew"........anywhere.
<P>
When I am working with brass to do some plumbing, I notice a characteristic smell. I notice the same smell on my hands after working on a tarnished, unlacquered sax.
I also think certain types of brass corrosion has a distinctive smell. Different horns will develop different types of corrosion.
Different people notice different smells.
I have an unlaquered Conn soprano that smelled like that typicall brass/copper smell that you get when you keep a jar of pennies locked away and it gets a bit moist. This is a real smell but it is very easy to take care of by just giving it a very light misting with WD40 - both inside and outside. The WD40 smell dissipates very quickly - and you may wipe it off a bit anyway depending on how copious the amount of WD40 is that you put on. Then, if you leave your horn in a stand instead of bagging it up, the smell probably won't come back, if it does, repeat.

On a side note, WD40 will not harm the pads.
 

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If one slips up and doesn't get all wet drips off the exterior of an unlacq'd horn, will that spot or spots over time, create marks or some kind of 'stain'? I think that is the concern.

The smell of raw brass is fine; a matter of taste I guess. But distinctly not mold smell.

I'm just wondering about moisture dabs, over time, causing mottling or something like that.
 

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If one slips up and doesn't get all wet drips off the exterior of an unlacq'd horn, will that spot or spots over time, create marks or some kind of 'stain'? I think that is the concern.

The smell of raw brass is fine; a matter of taste I guess. But distinctly not mold smell.

I'm just wondering about moisture dabs, over time, causing mottling or something like that.
Yes. Consider it “Living Art”, if that’s your thing.
 

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How long would it take for a Selmer Paris Super Action 80 Series II to lose its lacquer and acquire a patina naturally?
It's hard to tell from your question whether you are simply curious about how long it will be until your horn, which now looks beautiful, will lose its lacquer which protects the brass and look like an old ratty horn, or whether you want this to happen quickly?

If you want it to lose its lacquer, I can only wonder why. Just play it for the next few decades and don't worry about the lacquer one way or the other, would be my advice.
 

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I have an unlaquered Conn soprano that smelled like that typicall brass/copper smell that you get when you keep a jar of pennies locked away and it gets a bit moist. This is a real smell but it is very easy to take care of by just giving it a very light misting with WD40 - both inside and outside. The WD40 smell dissipates very quickly - and you may wipe it off a bit anyway depending on how copious the amount of WD40 is that you put on. Then, if you leave your horn in a stand instead of bagging it up, the smell probably won't come back, if it does, repeat.

On a side note, WD40 will not harm the pads.
I'd be careful spraying WD40 on a sax. I think it would be very capable of softening the glue used to attach felts to the keys on many instruments.
(BTW be careful how you quote. The first two sentences in your post are not from me yet
appear as if they were posted by me. Trust the "Reply with quote" tab.)
 
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