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Discussion Starter #1
Kind of an interesting story here. Over the summer, my friend gave me an Olds bari that he had sitting around the house. From what he said, I was under the impression that it was beyond playing and beat up beyond attempting to reasonably repair. So after months of storage in the trunk of my car, I pulled it out to clear some space for some other musical equipment. I then took a test play on it to see how bad the damage was, and it turns out that this is actually one of the nicest baris I've played on, and easily beats out the two brand new Yamahas at my high school.

Now this horn is really, really ugly, with a couple different shades of rust, some original lacquer, and some areas that are just unlacquered. So my question is, what would an approximate cost be to have the rest of the lacquer removed from the horn? I've read about doing it myself, but that seems way over my head.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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8,588 Posts
I believe the general consensus will be to leave it alone if it's playing well.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Mmmm....I wouldn't say that would be the consensus...

...or, more accurately: I agree the consensus would be Don't Delacquer It.

But it wouldn't be Leave It As It Is.

Sounds ugly...and that "rust" is really red rot. It's always a good idea to remove red rot.

If it were mine, and I was not mechanically inclined whatsoever....I would bring it to a tech and ask him/her how much it'd cost to either chem clean or sonic clean the body. While they are at it...take care of any significant leaks as well. Now, given that it plays already and assuming most pads are still in decent shape, and assuming it doesn't have any serious damage...all of that might run you around $500.

If it were mine, and I was pretty mechanically inclined...I would remove the keys and chem-wash the body myself, in the bathtub, with a good home-made chem bath solution (PM me if interested). Hand-polish it afterward, hand-clean the keys as best I can (being careful of the pads), reassemble. Then take it to the tech and ask 'em to spend $200-250 worth of time on the horn starting with the top repair priorities.

I delacquer horns from time to time; and have done well over a dozen, and am not shy to do it when the situation seems to warrant it...but the thought of delacquering a BigHorn is just....oomph....:shock:

....I'd prefer not to...:|
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Mmmm....I wouldn't say that would be the consensus...

...or, more accurately: I agree the consensus would be Don't Delacquer It.
Agreed. That's a better characterization.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the thoughts. I probably won't end up getting it done, but I was just curious just in case.

I'll try and get a picture or two up too.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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Those Olds saxes are not highly valued. But any playing bari is probably at least worth $750. But comparing that to the cost of the complete overhaul that would be required when removed all lacquer, I'd vote to just play and enjoy the sax, battle scars and all. And the best money you could spend would probably be to just take it to the music shop and have a good tech give it a good once-over and regulation.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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I have 3 baris. All Bueschers, all are fugly beasts with many dings, dents, and very spotty lacquer. I wear them like a badge of honor. :)
 

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Distinguished SOTW Technician, Forum Contributor 2
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What I'm curious about is whether this is a Pierret stencil or not.
Me too. Did Olds ever stencil an American bari? I've only seen alto and tenors that were Buescher A20's or Martin Indiana stencils.
 
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