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Constructing a music room in basement. Added a very good dehumidifier. So how dry is too dry, if that’s a thing.
Normal reco is ~45-55 RH, but what about a room full of saxes? Is dryer better/worse?
 

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50% is what I understand a museum strives for. Seems like that would be a good recommendation. If you have forced-air heat and AC, you actually will need a humidifier to maintain 50%.
 

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Constructing a music room in basement. Added a very good dehumidifier. So how dry is too dry, if that’s a thing.
Normal reco is ~45-55 RH, but what about a room full of saxes? Is dryer better/worse?
Inadequate ventilation and mold from excessive humidity I’m guessing would be more of a issue.
 

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I've kept my basement music room at 50% for 20 years with no problems. I usually leave my saxes out on stands to dry out after playing and swabbing.
 

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I live in Maine and wish I could get a dehumidifier for my entire state this time of year.
 

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For prolonged storage stay under 60. That is the important thing. Creepy crawlers can live in a moist environment which your leather pads become at 60 percent and above.

There is really no reason to push below 45. Leather has a pretty broad range which is one reason we use it so much. Do some finger walking for storage of leather valuables and antiques.
 

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As far as I remember when I looked into this, mould is likely to grow at about 68% and above. I try and keep mine between 55% and 60%. I also have clarinets, so not aiming for anything drier to minimize humidity difference when they are not in the basement. Any lesser humidity, if you need a dehumidifier to achieve it, is probably just a waste of electricity.

Chris
 

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In addition to my tenor which I keep out on a stand, I have acoustic and electric guitars hanging on the walls in our basement. In winter, I use a humidifier to keep the humidity above 40%. Otherwise, the guitar necks shrink and the frets stick out. For heat in our house, we have a Williams 60,000 BTU natural gas-fired freestanding space heater in the basement. It's like having a wood-burning stove without the nuisance of wood; it's radiant heat. Very comfortable. I installed 10" x 12" vents in the floor above. The warm air rises through the vents, warming the main floor of the house. The heat also warms the wooden floor so it's like having in-floor radiant heating. It's a bungalow. I don't miss the forced-air furnace we had before we replaced it with the space heater. No forced-air dust blowing around the house.

The basement walls are insulated as well. One inch Styrofoam against the concrete walls and then 3 1/2" studded walls with Rockwool insulation. Really warm during our frigid winters.

However, we've had a lot of rain this summer and the humidity in the basement has been between sixty and seventy percent. I've been using the dehumidifier to get the humidity down to fifty percent. So far, I've never had a problem with mould.
 

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My basement dehumidifier's been running non-stop, drawing about 3 gallons of water daily, while holding at 66%. If I ever get around to refinishing it and setting up a recording space, I'll need to add a second unit. Even so, I'd probably not leave any instruments down there.
 

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My basement dehumidifier's been running non-stop, drawing about 3 gallons of water daily, while holding at 66%. If I ever get around to refinishing it and setting up a recording space, I'll need to add a second unit. Even so, I'd probably not leave any instruments down there.
I'm curious. Where does 3 gallons of water per day come from!
That's one heck of a lot of clothes drying. Or you are circulating a heck of a lot of outside air into the house. If so, is that necessary?
 

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No laundry in the basement. But like most everywhere, it's been hot here--as high as 93F and at or near 100% humidity for much of July. I don't like running the AC more than required to prevent mold, so keep it at about 78, except when guests drop by. And yeah, it's a mid-century home that's not perfectly sealed.
 

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50% is what I understand a museum strives for. Seems like that would be a good recommendation. If you have forced-air heat and AC, you actually will need a humidifier to maintain 50%.
I've spent the majority of my life living in the South (New Orleans, Memphis and Little Rock areas) 50% is dry to me, but it is what a museum would do for instruments or paintings. That's where I've always tried to keep mine 40 to 55%
 

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That’s just NY weather this time of the year, Gordon. It is simply dreadful.

I'm curious. Where does 3 gallons of water per day come from!
That's one heck of a lot of clothes drying. Or you are circulating a heck of a lot of outside air into the house. If so, is that necessary?
 

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Do people live there? :)
I have visited Washington DC, Maryland, North / South Carolina and Florida. That humidity is miserable. Just picture taking a shower and not being able to dry off. Clothes dryers are all electric or forget it. Trust Zoot went he says 3 gallons a day in a older home.
 
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