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Discussion Starter #1
I really like it. The store wants $295 for it. It needs work to be playable, but I think its a fair price. It's a Selmer Paris, the improved model. Serial # starts with K and it has three pads instead of two. Rings on the top. Not sure if its HP or LP, but it said US and Canada on the bell, so I'm assuming it's LP, if thats even anything to go by. I couldn't find LP or HP anywhere on the body. Here's a pic.
 

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Unless you're thinking of moving to Vienna, playing trad jazz, or are just a collector, I'd leave the albert/oehler systems alone.
 

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Yeah, but if you play traditional jazz, this horn my be just the ticket. Albert system is the favorite of the oldtime players

Check thoroughly for cracks in the upper joint and barrel. Check the face of the tone holes for excessive wear. Synthetic pads like Valentino can help if the tone hole facings are a bit warped and worn. Cracks can be pinned. But look thoroughly so you don't encounter expensive surprises later.
 

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Get a measurement. If it's ~22 inches without the mouthpiece it's a HP clarinet.
And... $295 for an 'unplayable' Selmer is a little high.
I have a HP Buffet Albert, 3 rings on top/2 on the bottom/alt Eb that I got for less than $100. All it needed was a repad.
Plays like a champ, but I can't use it for anything around here....
 

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Seems a tad expensive to me too. I got a terrific Boosey and Hawkes Albert in gigging condition for $150. I just wanted one in my collection to fool about with. You should be clear why you're thinking of getting one. Unless you're serious about changing, or adding new fingering skills then perhaps paying over the odds for a curiosity is not the way to go.
 

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If it's a LP, grab it. Those old Selmer "3 keys in a row" alberts are selling for over $1k. That's the horn that Bigard and Fazola played. You can always flip it at a profit. I can find a buyer in a minute. I wish I had one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I thought about getting it just to have in the collection. I don't know when I'd ever be able to get it overhauled though. But yeah Barry, I did see the prices on those, thats why I thought $295 was a good price. But who knows. I'm still thinking about it.

Also, the mouthpiece it had said "Manhattan" on it. Anyone familiar?
 

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FYI, the upper joint has two flush bands on it - a crack repair.
looks like an HP from the register vent location (probably 448)
is that an adjustable barrel ?

but it looks good. I like those Selmers (but prefer them in LP)
 

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I have played both systems. The Boehm is usually better in tune around the Bb, and it's really handy when playing fast runs.

There is no real reason to buy an Albert (Albrecht here in Germany) unless you play in a band where all the clarinets are Albert (as I do). Because you can't really mix, they don't match. If you only play solo then it doesn't matter.

That hole in the joint of the second section is odd - Boehms have those but I never saw an Albert like that.
 

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I have played both systems. The Boehm is usually better in tune around the Bb, and it's really handy when playing fast runs.

There is no real reason to buy an Albert (Albrecht here in Germany) unless you play in a band where all the clarinets are Albert (as I do). Because you can't really mix, they don't match. If you only play solo then it doesn't matter."

Sorry, but I disagree. I know German System players who play fast and accurately. And in MY opinion, a concert Bb (or any note, really) if on pitch, is that note. Why would it matter if the note came out of a Boehm or an Albert (and yes, I own and play both)?

I know some have claimed they can identify an Albert from a Boehm just by listening to it, but I don't buy it. What they may be hearing is playing style, not sound or tone. Those who play like Bechet and Dodds and George Lewis on clarinet tend to use Alberts; those who play like Goodman, Shaw, Fountain, tend to use Boehms. My Boehms sound just like my Alberts. DAVE
 

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the other day I was watching a concert on a concert TV channel " Brava" it was a German orchestra and all the clarinet players played Oehler clarinets, they played very well and very fast..........
 

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Like Dave Dolson I play both Boehm and Oehler (or "improved Albert" if you prefer) systems (myself on bass clarinet as well as soprano), but have been playing Boehm system many, many more years. Taking that vastly different length of playing time into account, I can't honestly call one system better than the other -- they both have their advantages and disadvantages. I like variety! BTW the Oehler-system bass clarinet is a very different beast than the Boehm version, because it has a much narrower bore (around .75" compared to around .93" for Boehm basses). This makes the Oehler bass sound and respond much differently. It's fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just an update, I have yet to go back to the store and measure the clarinet, because the store is pretty far from where I live. I'll let you all know if it's HP or LP when I go back.
 

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It seems that some people feel that it's somehow easier or better to play traditional jazz on an Albert.

Having never played an Albert, why would this be so? Is there something about an Albert that makes it intrinsically easier to play that type of music? Or is it just because all the original players would have used an Albert?
 

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I don't think so, it is just a different and somewhat more antiquate system which was around and was probably cheaper at the time (and now!)
 

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I am one to believe it doesn't matter which system is used for trad jazz, even though the original players used Alberts. The two systems are almost equally old, though. I've long forgotten the dates attributed to each system but they both go back into the mid 1800's, as I recall.

I have no idea why players play the systems they do. It may be the attempt to appear authentic when playing original jazz. DAVE
 

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Does that mean that if I want to play original classical I'll have to use my Albert?
Dang.... Just when I was starting to get the hang of my Boehms. ;)
 

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Even though both systems are equally old, you MUST use an Albert (okay, Oehler, if others insist) to be authentically old-timey, especially if in Germany. DAVE
 

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Even though both systems are equally old, you MUST use an Albert (okay, Oehler, if others insist) to be authentically old-timey, especially if in Germany. DAVE
What about silly headgear? Do they wear Tyrolean hats instead of pork pies there?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What about silly headgear? Do they wear Tyrolean hats instead of pork pies there?
Nope. Or at least not when I lived there.

Well... except for my uncle when he tried to be stereotypical in front of the Americans in our family. :whistle:
 
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