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For those of you who live in climates subject to marked seasonal change, how do you deal with the change from humid summer to dry fall/winter air? I’m in the Midwest (Minneapolis) and the last couple of weeks have been a drastic change from still unusual moisture in the air/high rain totals for fall to suddenly quite cool seasonal dry air. It’s wreaked havoc on reeds. I used to avoid soaking reeds as my mpcs played better when the reeds were drier but I’ve got a few new mpcs and thinking maybe they could use reeds that are soaked longer before playing. Or maybe I should just try to get used to legeres once and for all! I’m tired of it! Ha. Curious how others adjust for this.
 

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For those of you who live in climates subject to marked seasonal change, how do you deal with the change from humid summer to dry fall/winter air? I’m in the Midwest (Minneapolis) and the last couple of weeks have been a drastic change from still unusual moisture in the air/high rain totals for fall to suddenly quite cool seasonal dry air. It’s wreaked havoc on reeds. I used to avoid soaking reeds as my mpcs played better when the reeds were drier but I’ve got a few new mpcs and thinking maybe they could use reeds that are soaked longer before playing. Or maybe I should just try to get used to legeres once and for all! I’m tired of it! Ha. Curious how others adjust for this.
I'm about 3 hrs. east of you in WI. I've been using my own "home brew" version of the reedjuvinate product for about 4 yrs now and zero problems with air/temp changes. If you want, shoot me a PM and I'll explain what my reed storage process is and for what it's worth, I'm confident that if you try it, you won't turn back.
 

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Currently it's cool and rainy here. Haven't noticed any variation in my reeds, but the neck seems easier to remove from my tenor, maybe because the tenon's not expanded quite as much as in summer. Soon it'll be winter and very cold, which means my horns will take forever to warm up, and will drip with excess condensation once they do.
 

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When the temperature drops below 65 degrees Fahrenheit, these fockers turn on the heaters. I always take five soprano and five tenor reeds, so that not an issue.
The inability to breath because the heaters are so focking hot is the only problem.
 

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I'm having to deal with the dry desert in Arizona after 20 years on the wet side of the Big Island. Everything is dried out! Reeds, hair fingernails, skin.

Don' t know how long it will take to adjust, but I've never had so many reeds chirp!
 

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I have been using this method (and the inexpensive product he recommends) for about 18 months, and travel regularly between Chicago and coastal FL. I have settled on the 72% humidity package, and found that it works brilliantly for me. In particular, the reeds play well with minor wetting, I have had zero mold, and after a long playing session, the reed has not swelled appreciably. In particular, I previously had issues with the reed swelling into the mouthpiece window, and that is now almost entirely a thing of the past.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ycd7YZ4a-fc
 

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I have been using this method (and the inexpensive product he recommends) for about 18 months, and travel regularly between Chicago and coastal FL. I have settled on the 72% humidity package, and found that it works brilliantly for me. In particular, the reeds play well with minor wetting, I have had zero mold, and after a long playing session, the reed has not swelled appreciably. In particular, I previously had issues with the reed swelling into the mouthpiece window, and that is now almost entirely a thing of the past.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ycd7YZ4a-fc
After many years of reed frustration, I also have settled on this method to an extent and it seems to work great for me. I do not soak reeds at all, I just wet them , make sure they seem to be sealing well on the mouthpiece and play them. When I am done (with a gig or whatever), I rinse them off and then put them in a zip lock bag in a reed holder ( the plastic ones that came with Vandoren reeds work great) , with a 72% humidity pack and that is it. I never get any warpage at all doing this, works great. And I am old school, still prefer 2 screw type ligs that hold the reed to the table along the sides of the butt end of the reed. If I do sand any reeds , as per that video, I never mess with the heart of the reed. I usually only make sure the flat part that sits on the table of the mpc is not warped. This can be flattened with a blade or reed geek tool.
 

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In East Idaho we skipped fall all-together this year...sad face. I went back to keeping my reeds in water all the time when I moved back here almost three years ago though: always the same, they just dry out a little quicker when it’s hot.
 

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Interesting conversation to this new sax player. I am 5 hours southeast of the original poster in eastern Iowa and wonder if the dry air is at work in my recent playing challenges. I have been playing for a year and during the past week I am finding several notes that just are not cooperating like they did before. I know my horn needs is leaking and needs some pads replaced but this is another entirely different behavior.
 

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Interesting conversation to this new sax player. I am 5 hours southeast of the original poster in eastern Iowa and wonder if the dry air is at work in my recent playing challenges. I have been playing for a year and during the past week I am finding several notes that just are not cooperating like they did before. I know my horn needs is leaking and needs some pads replaced but this is another entirely different behavior.
Seems like it's time to have the horn worked on. Often that fixes apparent reed or mouthpiece problems.
 

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Seems like it's time to have the horn worked on. Often that fixes apparent reed or mouthpiece problems.
I am scheduling lessons with a seasoned tenor player and saving for the repairs. I suspect you are right... time to deal with the leaks. I had the horn looked over at TenorMadness and was told that if I could learn to play on it as it sits I can play on anything. :badgrin:
 

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This is a timely topic for me because just recently we had a rather rare low humidity event here on the coast where I live in the Bay Area. Because of my proximity to the ocean, the humidity is fairly steady and relatively high year-round. I've never noticed any issues with the local climate and my reeds. Until last week when a Diablo wind blew in from the east, bringing hot, super dry air from well inland. The humidity dropped from around 70% down into single digits. And suddenly even my best reeds played poorly. At first I didn't know what the hell was going on, then when the humidity returned to normal after a couple of days (I've never been so happy to see the fog roll in), the reeds were fine again. So I see a pretty direct correlation there.

Now I know why some of you who live in the desert (Hello Cash!!) use synthetic reeds.
 

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I do the opposite of what most players that keep their reeds in humidity-controlled cases do. I remember reading that David Bilger felt that reeds played best when given time to acclimate to the humidity of your climate. Especially when seasons are changing, after removing them from their Vandoren packages (annoying) I let my reeds sit bark-side down on my desk for a few days before playing them. I've had reeds that have gone weird as the seasons changed and this seemed to help. Just like with woodworking it takes wood some time to even out humidity-wise and therefore vibrate its best.

Maybe it sounds like voodoo but it's easy to do and works for me.
 

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I'm currently running two humidifiers in the house, and will soon add a third as the mercury continues to drop. My reeds are doing fine so far, provided they're pre-soaked.

But I have noticed some other small changes of late. My B12 tenor takes longer to warm up, and produces more condensation than usual. And the snug-fitting neck is a bit easier to remove than usual, which is actually a welcome change.

Since DST, the change in ambient natural light also influences what I feel like playing at a given time of day.
 

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I wonder what archeologists of the future will conclude about cane reeds? Object of devotion that require little magic shrines?
 

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Seems like it's time to have the horn worked on. Often that fixes apparent reed or mouthpiece problems.
I am scheduling lessons with a seasoned tenor player and saving for the repairs. I suspect you are right... time to deal with the leaks. I had the horn looked over at TenorMadness and was told that if I could learn to play on it as it sits I can play on anything.
In that case you are working harder than you need to. It's hard enough to play well without fighting your equipment. Get it fixed if you can.
 
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