Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
My personal experience is when I used a Legere reed, it gave me a much brighter sound. Of course after a few weeks the Legere got way to soft and I had to switch back to cane.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2008
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
You might ditch the B45. It's not exactly on the darker end of the spectrum. You might also consider going up a 1/2 strength on the reeds, if you keep that piece.

The B40 has the same specs, but a broader tip rail. It tends to play a touch darker, IME.

OTOH, darkness for it's own sake is overrated.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member
Joined
·
4,673 Posts
OK, I was going to suggest you switch to V12's but you're already there...
I also play a B45 but with #4 V12's and it's dark enough for me. Maybe a smaller tip opening with harder reeds?

edit: Merlin beat me to it....
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
2,081 Posts
Embouchure. Try shaping your mouth cavity in different ways (make it small with a high tongue, or large and hollow with a rather retracted tongue, think of "ee" and "oo" while playing etc) and see what a tremendous difference in sound colour you can achieve.
Mouthpiece/Reed certainly play their roles, but the biggie IMO is the embouchure.

And I agree with Merlin - "darkness" is overrated, and you'd have to carefully decide where to sound "dark" and where not. (eg "Baby Elephant Walk" requires a rather bright tone, doesn't it?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Embouchure. Try shaping your mouth cavity in different ways (make it small with a high tongue, or large and hollow with a rather retracted tongue, think of "ee" and "oo" while playing etc) and see what a tremendous difference in sound colour you can achieve.
Mouthpiece/Reed certainly play their roles, but the biggie IMO is the embouchure.

And I agree with Merlin - "darkness" is overrated, and you'd have to carefully decide where to sound "dark" and where not. (eg "Baby Elephant Walk" requires a rather bright tone, doesn't it?)
I see what you mean, that does seem to make an imediate difference! Any thoughts on double lip\single lip embouchure? I'm currently using double, mostly experimentaly.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member
Joined
·
4,673 Posts
You might perceive your tone as being darker with a double lip embouchure because you're not feeling the vibrations through your teeth, but I doubt it can be heard by a listener.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
2,081 Posts
You might perceive your tone as being darker with a double lip embouchure because you're not feeling the vibrations through your teeth, but I doubt it can be heard by a listener.
That raises an interesting point - if you have access to a recording device, use it. That one might tell you more "objectively" if your tone is getting darker or brighter.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,799 Posts
I found that my tone got darker when I made an effort to point the clarinet down more like authentic clarinet players do. I was playing with it pointed outward like many sax players play. Something about the airstream heading straight into the clarinet mouthpiece as compared to flowing in and hitting the mouthpiece and down was a huge sound difference for me. Also, I read on a clarinet forum about playing with your oral cavity expanded like you are yawning. I started doing that and my sound improved also. Give it a try.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
Is your playing darker than this clip I recorded last night?

http://cierra.cc/CavalierDemo2.mp3

I bought this crystal mouthpiece because it sold really cheap on eBay and I know they often bring quite a bit. But I've really enjoyed playing it because of the dark tone and because it doesn't jar my teeth the way the O'brian does. Mouthpieces seem to make a huge difference on clarinet much the same as they do on sax.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
This has been discussed by clarinetists for eons.......... what is a dark clarinet sound? It's not very difficult to be dark in the lower register. As a matter of fact, it's difficult to be bright in the lower registers. What is difficult is to be dark in the upper register. When it comes to clarinet, contrary to popular belief, I don't think there are any bright or dark mouthpieces out there. It's all in the shape of your embouchure, tip opening, air control and where you put your whole tongue not just the tip.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member, musician, technician &
Joined
·
4,983 Posts
But I've really enjoyed playing it because of the dark tone
Interesting. I listened to the clip and consider the tone very bright. It's a type of trebley tone with a slight high buzz that a lot of players in old traditional jazz style use. There is some reverb "hiding" the brightness a little bit. Not a bad thing BTW, so no one mistakenly thinks I'm saying that, just what it sounds like.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
I wouldn't say that's a dark sound, but it's hard to judge because the song stays only in the low register.
Yes,

I recorded that clip just to show how the metal clarinet sounded in low register. :)

Tonight, I will try and record something more into the "clarion" range. But don't waste a lot of time with me. I'm just a sax player with a good microphone and a large-chambered crystal clarinet mouthpiece. I probably don't know what I'm talking about here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Is your playing darker than this clip I recorded last night?

http://cierra.cc/CavalierDemo2.mp3

I bought this crystal mouthpiece because it sold really cheap on eBay and I know they often bring quite a bit. But I've really enjoyed playing it because of the dark tone and because it doesn't jar my teeth the way the O'brian does. Mouthpieces seem to make a huge difference on clarinet much the same as they do on sax.
That's an interesting sound. I've been interested in trying a crystal mouthpiece on clarinet, myself. The crystal mpc and the metal clarinet work well together, but I agree with Clarnibass, its not a really 'dark' sound. Its not the classical 'covered' sound either, but I like it!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member, musician, technician &
Joined
·
4,983 Posts
I recorded that clip just to show how the metal clarinet sounded in low register. :)
Around 0:40 in the clip it's not low and still has the same type of tone. Just curious, do you play/like mostly traditional jazz? That's what your tone seems to be most influenced by. Some very good players choose to use this type of tone.
Do you sound significantly different on another clarinet or with another mouthpiece?

That's an interesting sound. I've been interested in trying a crystal mouthpiece on clarinet, myself. The crystal mpc and the metal clarinet work well together, but I agree with Clarnibass, its not a really 'dark' sound. Its not the classical 'covered' sound either, but I like it!
I've played a crystal mouthpeice for years and have tried many more of them. I also fooled with a couple of metal clarinets. When I played, the tone was nothing like Enviroguy's (although mine is not the covered classical tone either IMO). So I'd say this tone is him and/or the specific clarinet and/or mouthpiece he is using. Definitely not the metal and crystal.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top