Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've had my D8 for a couple of decades now - doesn't owe me anything (bought it for a fiver off a market stall), and because of the bite mark I've worn in the beak over the years it's probably not highly saleable.
I've been completely delighted with the piece down the years - but as I've grown older and the type of gigs I'm doing have changed, I find I'm wanting to rein in a little of the D8's brightness.
I'm planning to get meself off to a shop or two and spend a few days going through a few pieces - I really like the immediacy and response from the Dukoff, so will probably have a look at some of their other models.
In the meantime though I figured it might be worth trying a few mods on this piece to see if I can deepen the core sound a little without losing 'the spark'.

I'm not going to touch the table or the rails - just the bore. If all else fails I can return it to more or less spec with resin and it will do just nicely as a backup.
I'm thinking in terms of smoothing out the bore, with perhaps a slight mod to the rear of the baffle - so would be interested to hear what people suggest.

Here's the 'beast' in question:

http://forum.saxontheweb.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=26013

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
If it were me...I would try taking the Baffle back a little at a time with a small diamond file. You actually will still get the same response and keep the brightness....but take your time, and do a small segment. You will actually increase the chamber size a little here by doing this. Don't be surprised that this does not make an Earth shattering difference.. I have done this with many Dukoff pieces. I did an Alto piece , and eventually almost eliminated the baffle,,turning it into a roll over type, and it is still bright, but a little richer, and complex in tonality. Hope this helps a little! Jim
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
25,978 Posts
I really like the immediacy and response from the Dukoff, so will probably have a look at some of their other models.
I would do this before you alter the piece you have. It might make you realize just how good yours actually is. I know from personal experience that Dukoff will sell visibly defective and unplayable mouthpieces new in the box. Also, rather than try to tweak what you've got, I would just experiment with other makes and models; picking them up second hand when you can and flipping and/or trading them for the value you paid should they not work out.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
38,840 Posts
I too would leave the old Dukoff alone (actually how about having it looked after by Ed Pillinger.........it looks like it might need a little attention if not perfecting) at least until you have found a valid replacement and even then I would hold on to the old Dukoff a while longer, as is, because one can easily get a fling for a new thing but you've played this piece for a very long time so let the new piece settle in and then do whatever you feel you want to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
I too would leave the old Dukoff alone (actually how about having it looked after by Ed Pillinger.........it looks like it might need a little attention if not perfecting) at least until you have found a valid replacement and even then I would hold on to the old Dukoff a while longer, as is, because one can easily get a fling for a new thing but you've played this piece for a very long time so let the new piece settle in and then do whatever you feel you want to do.
Same opinion here.
Ed Pillinger is a perfect option (but you already know...). Remember also that Mojo is a Dukoff expert. I will never modify a mouthpiece I've been playing for 20 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,975 Posts
Stephen's a big boy and would not have posed this question without knowing the risk/reward issues. I would recommend opening up the throat area by first removing the wart and smoothing out the edges from the casting cores. This will make it a little darker and more spread sounding. Then if you want to go more, work on cheeking out the sides of the the throat where there is a squeeze to the sides now. You can go a little or a lot here. Last, I usually remove the roll-over baffle thear the tip and make it straight. You probably want to stay away from this area as it is difficult to do this without nicking up the tip rail. Plus, it may change the mouthpiece too much for your tastes.

I have photos on my site of Dukoff work and a private video I can let you see if you are on Facebook. These changes have been very popular with tenor players that come to me.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It's a tricky one, I know - and I can't fault the good advice given...it's probably what I would have said to anyone else asking the same question, but I'm at a place where it's pretty much the end of the line for the D8. Put it this way, although I gig with the D8, I'm practising with my testbench Vandoren T23.
Worst case scenario, I screw up the Dukoff beyond redemption and have to get off my backside and go shopping - which is something I've been putting off for a while.

Like Mojo says, I know all too well what the risks are...have successfully trashed a good many cheapy plastic pieces in my attempts to knock up a Dukoff on the cheap, so I know my limitations (stay well away from the rails!).
I think what I'll do is, as suggested, clean up the casting lumps and bumps and see what that does for it. I did this once before with an old steel berg, and the results were spectacular.
If that knocks back the brightness a touch it'll be a boon, and might even mean the D8 gets to see another 20 years!

If I **** it up, I will come back and say 'You were right!' and buy everyone a pint!

Regards,
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Stephen,
I've had a couple Dukoff's over the years too (for tenor that is), I think as most of us have who have played long enough. My last one was a M8 that I had Mojo do his "work" on. I purchased it specifically for a rock tour I was going out with, and it was just what I needed, subsequently I sold it because that "brightness" just isn't me. I could have had it worked on but my old faithful (for 40 years), a 1960's gold over brass Berg with less than a "3" baffle is just too fine!

Maybe you should do the "search" for something you can wrap yourself around and just put the Dukoff away, you might indeed regret screwing with it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Hi Stephen, if I understand correctly, the sound of your dukoff you like but want a little more soft .... I have had many dukoff for tenor, soprano and alto and I was able to experience the effect of any changes. If you do not want to touch the table and the rails, I advise you to remove the deficiencies of the chamber (I noticed that all Dukoff have the chamber and the portion between the slide and the chamber finished in an irregular way) and maybe smooth out the step . I do not recommend you to enlarge the chamber because I have noticed that in doing so the sound 'is dirty'. Or if you do not want to touch your Dukoff, if you want the same spark and a little less than brilliant, I recommend you simply try a MB II mouthpiece, the Guardala mouthpieces are very efficient! If you are interested please contact me in MP, I have many photos of my ex dukoff ...or they may be of interest, I can post photos directly to this thread
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Well, so far so good...ish.
I spite of the good advice to leave well alone I decided to have a go...
I've levelled out the wart at the rear of the slope and flattened off the casting ridges where the chamber meets the bore. I've also mostly removed the lumps and bumps from the rear of the baffle and very slightly rounded the rollover.
Made no difference at all. I've left it rough for now...working on the principle that a little at a time is the way to go. When I have more time I'll smooth off what I've done so far, check how it sounds and either call it quits before I get out of my knowledge zone or go for broke and carry on.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Stephen, please keep us posted as you go. I've been playing my D8 for over 20 years and am still happy with it for the times when I want to get loud and edgy. I'm VERY interested in how your experiment turns out. Thanks for posting and please do more follow up as you proceed with this project. Thanks and good luck!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top