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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
for some reason my d note :line4:

on my alto is pretty grainy... i dont think there is any leaks but when i mess with my reed a bit it sorta corrects it. whats weird is low d is fine..

any suggestions?
 

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Character baby that's all. I wouldn't worry about it unless it out of tune. Otherwise think of it as your saxophones little imperfection that gives it it's uniqueness.
 

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gritty is good...grainy is bad...
 

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That D uses the extremes of the compromises of location and size of the body octave vent. Check that it is not partially blocked, and that the pad lifts at least a couple of mm. Make sure the neck vent is fully and securely closed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gordon (NZ) said:
That D uses the extremes of the compromises of location and size of the body octave vent. Check that it is not partially blocked, and that the pad lifts at least a couple of mm. Make sure the neck vent is fully and securely closed.
uses the extremes of the body octave vent... you mean the like second smallest pad right?

ill check it out thanks! =)



jbtsax said:
Two questions. What do you mean by grainy. I have never heard that term used to describe tone before, And, is this the alto that you repadded a while back?

John

yes it is!! it plays saxily did i mention? haha very free blowing. by grainy i mean its like theres a damn vibrating piece of wood or something in the sax. if that explains it!
 

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xsnoopyx said:
... you mean the like second smallest pad right?

ill check it out thanks! =)
I mean the SMALLEST pad on the body. The one that opens when you change from 1st octave G to second octave G.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
but isnt that the key on the neck? it thought you meant on the body.. i dont think the octave key opens when you play d right?

btw if this helps at all, regular d plays fine..

got your pm btw
 

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There are two octave vents, one on the neck and one on the body.

The one on the neck is SUPPOSED to open only for second-octave A and above.

When you have the G key down (second octave fingering, with thumb down), the neck one should close, and the similar octave vent on the body open INSTEAD.

Check that this is happening.

The octave vent in the body is is about 2" down from the top of the body.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yeah crap it isnt open enough i think. the cork i put there is too fat i believe.. :|

i moved it up a bit and it works a lot better. hey do you know where to get pearl keys that match a yamaha yas 23? same horn lol.
 

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They're a pretty standard size. Jupiter may be easier to find.
Techs probably stock something suitable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I meant the look of it but ill just buy off of musicmedic. the article you wrote is for the other mechanism, i think i have the older "more crappy mechanism" when i compare to the rest of the ones other people in band have


what do you know about different corks to use ? i really need to put on diff. sized cork, the one i have right now is too fat! :|
 

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If you want cork to have stable thickness (for accuracy in a mechanism), then natural cork is pretty hopeless, especially if it is over 0.4 mm thick. For these situations, I (along with Yamaha and Yanagisawa, but not Selmer in their apparent ignorance) use a composite cork such as what Musicmedic sells. It is far more difficult to sand this to a different thickness, although it is available in a wide variety of thickneses. Here is where adjustment by bending (of metal parts) comes to the fore, and is standard practice, both in manufacture and susequently. Of course, you need to know what to bend, how to do it safely, have appropriate tools, and be able to deal with any problems this may create, such as a binding pivot. This is where a good technician is invaluable.
 
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