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New here and already so happy i found this ckmmunity.
I have been handed down about a dozen antique instruments. From Accorians to this D. Nobler metal clarinet from my father.
It does not have a diamond but instead an oval around the name D. Nobler and Paris below that.
No other symbols above it or elsewhere.
Made in France is on the top of the neck
Serial number is 2888
Hard case and clarinet are in great condition with no tarnish, risy or broken keys from I can see.

I do not play and would likely be looking to sell it.
Any information or value would be an amazing help.
I appreciate all of your talents and knowledge in advance.
Thank you
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That is an Albert System clarinet (as opposed to the more popular Boehm System). Did you happen to see an "H" stamped anywhere near the serial number? Or maybe an "L"? Or the words "Low Pitch" or "High Pitch" anywhere?

The fingering system probably reduces the interest in the thing with the exception of the small number of simple-system players around these days. And if it is a high-pitch instrument, it should make a good lamp.

I also suspect that it needs to be overhauled to make it playable. Looked to me like one of the pads fell out of the cup. And, the overall length will help others tell you if it is a Bb or C clarinet - I can't tell from the photos you attached. Bb would be the better pitch for sale. DAVE
 

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this finger system may be defined as Albert as Dave Dyson says but also as German system (differences are subtle). Besides the Obvious finger system differences with a Boehm system there are also differences in bore

Any which way, they are considerably more popular (provided it isn’t high pitch but it may very well not be) among German Players ( they still play German System in Germany ) AND (and here comes the sales opportunity) among the Traditional Jazz ( New Orleans style) community , some of whom favor the German style or Albert for their playing.

Also traditional Klezmer music would be played on German System (or Albert) clarinets.

Despite being a good brand, value is not really high and even if playing it is probably around U.S. $200
 

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Agree with what Dave and Milandro said above. Not likely a high dollar item, but assuming it’s not high pitch, there are definitely people who are interested in them. Your challenge will be finding them.

There’s some good information about fingering systems at this link: <Clarinet Fingering Systems - Vintage clarinet and saxophone repair, restoration, sales.>

The man who runs that site sells & restores old clarinets, including Albert system horns. He might be able to advise you of the best way to dispose of your instrument.
 

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I may a bit off on this but I've always thought that the difference between Albert and German (Oehler) was the venting - some of the tone holes (notes) on Oehlers have additional linkage to open another vent to assist in intonation issues. I have both systems in my closet. I didn't see the extra venting in the OP's photos.

On a European river cruise one year, I stumbled upon a music store off of a German town's square. Inside they had several German system clarinets by various manufacturers. I was allowed to play one (a Yamaha) using my own mouthpiece (a Lakey 5*) and the clerk was astonished at the sound I got out of the thing. He explained that the German System was very popular in Germany and that they called Boehm clarinets "French" system. The fingering is the same among Alberts and German/Oehler-System as far as I know.

For the record, I prefer Boehm and I'm not convinced about the tonal differences between the two systems, as is claimed by the old New Orleans-style Albert players. Others will surely disagree. DAVE
 
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