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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve played an S901 straight soprano for several years, but I’ve started to get wrist and elbow pains - tendonitis?

I bought an ERGOsax support.
View attachment 235344
This is excellent and reduces the pain, but I still get some pain, especially in my right elbow.

I think a curved soprano might help my elbow pain. Try this:
1. Stand with your hands by your sides - palms facing your legs. Hands, wrists and forearms all seem to be in a relaxed, “neutral” position.

2. Move your arms to an alto/curved soprano position. The elbows bend, but the wrists and forearms are still “neutral”.

3. Move your arms to a straight soprano position. I like to hold the soprano quite high - better for my neck - see the ERGOsax photo.
The forearms have to twist slightly, putting extra stress on the elbows. I think this would aggravate the tendonitis.

Hope my experiment makes sense. I would welcome your thoughts, especially if your have medical knowledge.



***** Please post comments about the ERGOsax support in the following thread *****
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?288834-ERGOsax-playing-support-for-Soprano-Saxophone
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The vertical mouse might support the idea of using the curved soprano hand position.

View attachment 235352
Why Use a Vertical Mouse? - Mary Stoesser
It is common for office workers to experience wrist and elbow pain from working long hours on a computer each day. The discomfort arises from frequently using a mouse with an awkward posture.
To ensure your wrist remains in the “right” posture, follow this tip: Hold your arm out as if you are about to shake someone’s hand. This “handshake posture” is a neutral (“the right”) position and will reduce the risk of a musculoskeletal injury occurring.



I held my computer mouse and then moved my hand into the vertical mouse "handshake" position. My forearm twisted into a neutral position - similar feeling to the curved soprano position in post #1.
 

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I dunno, but I have a dual neck Yanagisawa, and find the curved neck allows for a more comfortable position, requiring less twisting of the right wrist.
 

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Yes, I always played straight soprano (as for me - educated clarinettist - it was obvious to me), but for some time while playing straight soprano I feel kind of pain (wrist, elbow, shoulder) that was imperceptible when playing alto and tenor.
So, I have recently bought curved soprano - for me when long time practising/playing it's much more comfortable.
I tried a few models, I think for one with hand problems it's important, too, to choose right curve soprano in terms of ergonomics, for me it was especially important in terms of the little finger of right and left hand keys.
 

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Absolutely, a curved is much easier and comfortable ergonomic-wise. That was the reason I bought a curvy, even though I like my straight soprano a little more. Being a mainly tenor player and not practicing regularly on the soprano I get tension very quickly in thumb and ellbow - not so with the curvy (yani S 902).
Also picking up the sound with the microphone is much better with the curvy. The straight just looks cooler. To me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, I always played straight soprano (as for me - educated clarinettist - it was obvious to me), but for some time while playing straight soprano I feel kind of pain (wrist, elbow, shoulder) that was imperceptible when playing alto and tenor.
So, I have recently bought curved soprano - for me when long time practising/playing it's much more comfortable.
I tried a few models, I think for one with hand problems it's important, too, to choose right curve soprano in terms of ergonomics, for me it was especially important in terms of the little finger of right and left hand keys.
Thanks for the very helpful advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Absolutely, a curved is much easier and comfortable ergonomic-wise. That was the reason I bought a curvy, even though I like my straight soprano a little more. Being a mainly tenor player and not practicing regularly on the soprano I get tension very quickly in thumb and ellbow - not so with the curvy (yani S 902).
Also picking up the sound with the microphone is much better with the curvy. The straight just looks cooler. To me.
Thanks for your help.
The straight just looks cooler. To me. Same here, but I suppose I've got to think of my elbow.
 

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OP--thanks for asking the question. I have been dealing with the same problem and wondering about this too.
Finding curvies to try (without buying them) is the problem.
 

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Thanks for your help.
The straight just looks cooler. To me. Same here, but I suppose I've got to think of my elbow.
The neck curve gets the body where you need it, for the preferred hand/wrist position, without compromising mouthpiece angle to your face - the curved bow/bell is not necessary. If you prefer a straight sop (as I do), but want the benefits of a curved neck, get a half-curved, aka “bent neck” sop.



P.S. Mine is not for sale.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OP--thanks for asking the question. I have been dealing with the same problem and wondering about this too.
Finding curvies to try (without buying them) is the problem.
Thanks Somes. We're getting a lot of helpful advice.
Yes, it's difficult for people who live a long way from a large music shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The neck curve gets the body where you need it, for the preferred hand/wrist position, without compromising mouthpiece angle to your face - the curved bow/bell is not necessary. If you prefer a straight sop (as I do), but want the benefits of a curved neck, get a half-curved, aka “bent neck” sop.



P.S. Mine is not for sale.
Thanks Dr G
The curved neck in the photo seems to have a sharper curve than some makes.

I wonder whether it's worth buying a two-neck Yanagisawa, and then buying the YNSC991 (curved soprano) neck.
I've read that the two were compatible, but I'm not sure whether this still applies to the latest Yanagisawa sopranos.
https://www.sax.co.uk/yanagisawa-ynsc991-neck-for-curved-soprano-saxophone-brass.ir


The YNSC991 neck has a greater curve than the curved neck on the two-neck soprano.
Best of both worlds? The look of the straight soprano, with the mouthpiece angle of the curved.
Possible problem - the extra length of the body might put more force on the right hand/wrist/elbow than the curved body.
 

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I wonder whether it's worth buying a two-neck Yanagisawa, and then buying the YNSC991 (curved soprano) neck.
I've read that the two were compatible, but I'm not sure whether this still applies to the latest Yanagisawa sopranos.
I sometimes use an SC992 neck on my SC901B in place of the original neck. It fits fine -- a little tighter than the original neck, but within the normal range of tenon variation. I didn't have to have anything resized.

I doubt that the tenon sizes have changed on the WO sopranos. Yanagisawa is typically pretty fastidious about keeping things like this standardized.

The YNSC991 neck has a greater curve than the curved neck on the two-neck soprano.
Best of both worlds? The look of the straight soprano, with the mouthpiece angle of the curved.
Yes, Yanagisawa makes/made four different soprano neck styles:
  • Straight
  • Curved 1, for a straight sop
  • Curved 2, for the old SC901 horns and previous
  • Curved 3, for the SC991 and SCWO horns
A decent fit is a strong likelihood, but you'll have to test for intonation and responsiveness.

Btw, I think a straight soprano looks "cooler" than a curved sop only if it's held way out in front, like a trumpet or magic wand, a la Sidney Bechet. That's not ergnomically feasible for many players. A straight sop with a curved neck, held downward like a normal sax or clarinet, is no cooler than a curvy -- maybe less so. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I sometimes use an SC992 neck on my SC901B in place of the original neck. It fits fine -- a little tighter than the original neck, but within the normal range of tenon variation. I didn't have to have anything resized.

I doubt that the tenon sizes have changed on the WO sopranos. Yanagisawa is typically pretty fastidious about keeping things like this standardized.



Yes, Yanagisawa makes/made four different soprano neck styles:
  • Straight
  • Curved 1, for a straight sop
  • Curved 2, for the old SC901 horns and previous
  • Curved 3, for the SC991 and SCWO horns
A decent fit is a strong likelihood, but you'll have to test for intonation and responsiveness.

Btw, I think a straight soprano looks "cooler" than a curved sop only if it's held way out in front, like a trumpet or magic wand, a la Sidney Bechet. That's not ergnomically feasible for many players. A straight sop with a curved neck, held downward like a normal sax or clarinet, is no cooler than a curvy -- maybe less so. :)
LostConn - Thanks for the very detailed information.
 

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Thanks Dr G
The curved neck in the photo seems to have a sharper curve than some makes.

I wonder whether it's worth buying a two-neck Yanagisawa, and then buying the YNSC991 (curved soprano) neck.
I've read that the two were compatible, but I'm not sure whether this still applies to the latest Yanagisawa sopranos.
https://www.sax.co.uk/yanagisawa-ynsc991-neck-for-curved-soprano-saxophone-brass.ir


The YNSC991 neck has a greater curve than the curved neck on the two-neck soprano.
Best of both worlds? The look of the straight soprano, with the mouthpiece angle of the curved.
Possible problem - the extra length of the body might put more force on the right hand/wrist/elbow than the curved body.
The curved neck lets you use a neck strap.
 

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You need to try out a curvy and you could rent , but why not find a local tech prepared to do a pro set up on Chinese horn then perhaps get a curvy from one of the online sites,. Many are either clones or tribute pieces but many are also collecting decent reviews and feedback. If the horn is no good or turns out uncomfortable you will either sell it for what you paid or lose little.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You need to try out a curvy and you could rent , but why not find a local tech prepared to do a pro set up on Chinese horn then perhaps get a curvy from one of the online sites,. Many are either clones or tribute pieces but many are also collecting decent reviews and feedback. If the horn is no good or turns out uncomfortable you will either sell it for what you paid or lose little.
Thanks - Excellent idea!
 

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I assume it wouldn't be a good idea to put a pipe bender to my single piece straight Conn :)
It can be done - not with a pipe bender, per se, but a straight neck can be bent in a controlled manner.
 
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