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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter #1
Should I be concerned whether or not my tenor mouthpiece was made by a craftsman?

If I have a non-craftsman generated mouthpiece, can it be redeemed by a refacer?

Also, it's 2019 - the proper terminology is craftsperson.
 

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Should I be concerned whether or not my tenor mouthpiece was made by a craftsman?

If I have a non-craftsman generated mouthpiece, can it be redeemed by a refacer?

Also, it's 2019 - the proper terminology is craftsperson.
Define "Craftsman"

Define "Refacer"
 

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Well, it is perfectly possible to have accurate facings (more accurate and consistent than hand work) by using machinery. However, the general scuttlebutt seems to be that few if any mouthpiece manufacturers that use machinery for final facing spend the time, money, and effort to dial in the process to achieve the accuracy and consistency that high grade machine tools could achieve. For something as small as a mouthpiece facing, in a soft material like brass or hard rubber, you could definitely hold tolerances in the range of 0.0002" if you wanted to, maybe tighter. But you need real engineers and machinists to get there, plus good high quality tight equipment.

The only way to answer your question for a specific mass produced mouthpiece is to do the measurements. If it meets the generally accepted tolerances then you don't need to have anyone work on it.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Should I be concerned whether or not my tenor mouthpiece was made by a craftsman?
How does it play? If it sucks, it doesn’t matter who made it - similarly if it plays well, so “No” could be an acceptable answer.

If I have a non-craftsman generated mouthpiece, can it be redeemed by a refacer?
It can be changed. Is that good enough?
 

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Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
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Should I be concerned whether or not my tenor mouthpiece was made by a craftsman?

If I have a non-craftsman generated mouthpiece, can it be redeemed by a refacer?

Also, it's 2019 - the proper terminology is craftsperson.
This is the first time I have seen the PC police be the poster correcting himself in the same post he is posting in........
 

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It wouldn’t matter at all who made your tenor mouthpiece if your tenor sax identified as an alto.

Hey-oh.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Oh, now I have to re-brand myself as '1saxperson'. Crap! It won't fit on my license plate! That's about the depth of my concern about it being '2019 so proper terminology must be used'.
 

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Should I be concerned whether or not my tenor mouthpiece was made by a craftsman?
If I have a non-craftsman generated mouthpiece, can it be redeemed by a refacer?
Also, it's 2019 - the proper terminology is craftsperson.
So you bought a pile from a rookie and want a quality journeyperson to cleanup the mess? I think that’s a question for a technician.
I’m only a jack. I don’t know jack about this kind of fix.
 

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Should I be concerned whether or not my tenor mouthpiece was made by a craftsman?

If I have a non-craftsman generated mouthpiece, can it be redeemed by a refacer?

Also, it's 2019 - the proper terminology is craftsperson.
I've actually given this question some thought. And since Keith (MojoBari) checked in on this thread, I have one possible answer:

Long ago, I had a Dukoff tenor mpc that looked like it was made in a toy factory. I've always understood these mpcs were cast from a mold, and therefore NOT made by a craftsman. I sent it to Mojo, who opened the tip slightly, cleaned it up technically and cosmetically, and turned it into a thing of beauty. I still kick myself for trading it away, but that was a long time ago, and now I'd know better.

I good refacer can substantially improve a faulty mass-produced mpc. It helps if you can tell your mpc tech what you want the mpc to try to do, that it's not doing now.

At the same time, I've heard people rave about their mass-produced mpc. It does just what they need it to do. Sometimes, then, there's no concern at all!
 

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I think in England the proper term is “Engineer”. Good luck being PC in the US.
"Machinist", "technician"???

Many engineers would hurt themselves if left unattended in a machine shop without adult supervision.
 

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"Machinist", "technician"???

Many engineers would hurt themselves if left unattended in a machine shop without adult supervision.
The engineer who would hurt himself if left unattended in the shop without supervision, is only half an engineer. (I am speaking from 35+ years spent in designing and bringing to production manufactured mechanical products intended for mass production and profitable sales.)

Nothing is to be gained by slamming each other. Tradesmen and engineers work together. Each has a certain set of expert skills. This does not mean they can't have competence in other skills. I am not a fast machinist but I certainly am competent. And many technicians and machinists have excellent understanding of business and mechanical design. That is why smart engineers go ask the guys on the production floor or in the toolroom.

Nevertheless, there is a big difference between a craftsman and an engineer. In any country. Neither is superior, but the skills are different.
 
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