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I was just wondering how is it done and I don't mean those altissimo multiphonics. Many contemporary altoist (like Sanborn, Rangell etc.) use this effect when they play higher notes like C3 (C + octave key) or D3 etc. They hold on to this note for awhile and it kind of cracks (no growl). Is it done just by overblowing or does it involve alternate fingerings or what? How does or does mpc/reed setup affect this?

This is the best I could explain this. Maybe I could put a short clip demonstrating this effect (if it's necessary)..

Thanks,
-TH
 

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When I had a dukoff on alto I used to split my A's all the time...trying to play like Sanborn. I'd finger A and aim lower as if playing overtone exercizes an it would split the note by an octave.
 

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After reading this thread and some others and actually trying it I found it fairly easy to pull off with the right mouthpiece and reed. Essentially from what I found you follow the above post about playing a low note and using your embrochure to raise the tone an octave. Work through the whole range until you have it down which if your a newer player will probably take some time. After some study of how that works I essentially found you are raising the center of the reed and closing the opening, then you just do that and force some more air through that opening and it split pretty easily. I only spent about 20 minutes on this and found I could get certain notes to do it easily F, G, D, other notes not as easily, however I think if I would like to be able to use it as a tool it has to be much more manageable which it currently is not. I think if I spent a few hours practicing this technique I would have it down, unsure if I would use it though, if you really want to use this it seems to me you must master not using the octave key, and that will be like a road directly to where you want to go. Hope this helps, never really listened to Sanborn can anyone point me to a tune of his which he uses this technique in a song? Thanks, Jay.
 

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the key word to this is imitate......play the damn CD and copy it, play it a thousand times until u sound better than the CD.........
 

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I (and about five other SOTW-ers) once owned a particular Martin Yanagisawa made alto. That horn would break F#3 and other notes ala Sanborn really easily - an 800 alto I had at the same time wouldn't.

So I think that there are certain aspects of a horn's design that lend it the ability to break. I think it's in the neck mostly...
 

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Having the mouthpiece come out of your mouth like at a clarinet angle like Sanborn does helps a little bit, but not much.
 
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