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I've stripped 3 horns myself, at home, using hot water and dishsoap.

Seriously.

So, I guess it was almost free.

If you're going to do any of the work yourself, it makes sense to do it that way, or ask the tech who is going to do the work what they would charge...

It can't be too exorbitant, but with the changes in a lot of environmental regulations, you might get a surprise.

dv
 

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jmm1713 said:
Does anyone know around how much it would cost to chemically strip a mark vi alto ??
Same amount as to strip a 6M?

Sorry, couldn't resist . . . next!!!!
 

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I don't know reeds-, it is a VI after all....

shouldn't EVERYTHING about these horns cost 2 to 3 times as much?

dv
 

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Then there is the question of WHY?
 

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I stripped my SA 80 at home using naval jelly. My tech at the time recommended that. It took constant application over 2 days, but it eventually worked. Now she's a marbly orange, gold, red, green ...and I think she's gorgeous. I left the lacquer on the keys because I didn't want to do a repad, and now, I'm glad I did as that effect adds a little more funk.
 

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I have stripped some saxes too and it really is pretty easy as stated above. What gets time consuming is if you want to relacquer.
 

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crashkahuna said:
I have stripped some saxes too and it really is pretty easy as stated above. What gets time consuming is if you want to relacquer.
Why is relacquer so time consuming? I'm considering doing a relacquer on my little Conn Alto "Shooter" when I do the rebuild. If figured I would strip her with navel jelly, let my brother-in-law add some custom engraving, hand polish her to a mirror-like shine and then gave her a couple of coats of light gold-tented clear spray lacquer.

I didn't figure that would be that hard. Am I missing something or leaving out an important step?
 

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jmm1713 said:
You are correct .
So bare brass is better than relacquer? Sorry, this makes no sense to me. What's the lacquer for in the first place--I believe it's to protect the brass.

The only people I know that care if a horn is a relaq are collectors. Players generally don't care what's on the horn, as long as it plays well.
 

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hakukani said:
So bare brass is better than relacquer? Sorry, this makes no sense to me. What's the lacquer for in the first place--I believe it's to protect the brass.

The only people I know that care if a horn is a relaq are collectors. Players generally don't care what's on the horn, as long as it plays well.

I wouldn't say better ("better" is a dangerous word on this forum), but I would say different for a few reasons.
#1 would be just appearance. Yamaha wouldn't be raking it in on the unlacquered 82Zs if there weren't lots of people out there that like the look. I personally prefer this look. That's a good enough reason for me.
#2 If it has already lost the resale value b/c of the relaq, why not just go all the way for getting the horn that plays best as well as matches your aesthetic tastes.
#3 It feels different in the hands (even if it doesn't effect sound). It vibrates differently; you can feel more.
#4 I happen to practice voodoo witchcraft, therefore, I believe in parabolic cones and different materials and finishes for different sounds.;)
 

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It's just the polishing or buffing that takes time - getting in all those little tight places around posts etc. But not too difficult and the results can be really good. It would need to be degreased before applying lacquer.
 

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The best way to strip a horn of lacquer is to handle it, practice on it, play on it until you've worn the lacquer away. It takes a looong time. But, oh, the difference in sound!

That being said, it's you guys own the horns, do with them what you want. I just have the feeling that you'll someday be cursed by the same folks that go, "OMG, I can't believe those turn of the century guys, they stripped the lacquer off their MkVIs!"

Just like now I hear people complain, 'OMG, they relaquered their MkVI back in the 70s'.

I have pitting on the parts of my MkVI alto where the brass is bare. I should have it gold plated, but I can't bear to part with it for that long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
hakukani said:
So bare brass is better than relacquer? Sorry, this makes no sense to me. What's the lacquer for in the first place--I believe it's to protect the brass.

The only people I know that care if a horn is a relaq are collectors. Players generally don't care what's on the horn, as long as it plays well.

Well it looks ugly in person ( to me at least ) -- but since I have some extra cash I am most likely just going to sell it as-is on ebay next week and buy an original mark vi or SBA .




 

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why even sell it? that's a PLAYERS horn, PLAY IT!!! :)
try it side by side with a few other VIs somewhere and just let yourself know that it sounds just as good, but you wouldn't be so worried about it at gigs.;
 

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If that sax were mine, there's no way I would strip it. OK . . . so it's a relacquer. Were I in the market for one, I would rather have one like that than the same sax stripped to bare brass.
 

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stripping the laquer will not raise the price as people can detect whether its been buffed or not. Just leave it as is
Dave
 
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