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Discussion Starter #1

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if these are, as I suspect, happening UNDER the lacquer (on account of some pollutant that got there before ti was sprayed with lacquer and acted slowly) there isn’t really much that you can do.

you may, locally, remove lacquer and the superficial corrosion with some steel wool of course these parts will darken and dull in time.

I have seen the very same thing on a soprano SA 80 II which I didn’t buy even though it was incredibly cheap. The neck doesn’t have it because it is literally another thing that started its life at a different place in the Selmer factory and was lacquered independently
 

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Discussion Starter #5
if these are, as I suspect, happening UNDER the lacquer (on account of some pollutant that got there before ti was sprayed with lacquer and acted slowly) there isn’t really much that you can do.

you may, locally, remove lacquer and the superficial corrosion with some steel wool of course these parts will darken and dull in time.

I have seen the very same thing on a soprano SA 80 II which I didn’t buy even though it was incredibly cheap. The neck doesn’t have it because it is literally another thing that started its life at a different place in the Selmer factory and was lacquered independently
That makes sense. There's no lacquer over these spots, so if they were under st some point, it's no longer the case.

Would the keys be matched to the body and then lacquered in the same process? This 'disease' is on both the body and the keyes.
 

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saxophones are lacquered without the keys on (otherwise they would cease) see this video of Selmer production Around 3’ 14”, keys and horns are lacquered separately ( but in the same station)
Now if the spraying had some irregularities ( the lacquer mix not being well made at that point) it will affect a number of saxophones and their parts.

 

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That actually looks like someone has dipped the sax into a chem dip, when you dip exposed brasss into the dips they come up slightly pinkish in the exposed areas, those photos look very pinkish. Buffing the surface and recounting will fix all the problems, but not as easy as it sounds fo the average person to do

Steve
 

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I'd be curious to know if it has been subject to a corrosive agent since manufacture, and if so, what it was.
Even some people's perspiration can be incredibly corrosive.
To take the zinc out of brass I believe an acid of some sort is most likely involved. That could be dampness in conjunction with an air pollutant eg sulphur dioxide, or even just an atmosphere rich in carbon dioxide, which with moisture makes carbonic acid.
An unflued gas heater could provide the right environment.
 

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That actually looks like someone has dipped the sax into a chem dip, when you dip exposed brasss into the dips they come up slightly pinkish in the exposed areas, those photos look very pinkish. Buffing the surface and recounting will fix all the problems, but not as easy as it sounds fo the average person to do

Steve
You lost me at "recounting" Steve. What does that mean?
 

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Given that most of the lacquer looks OK, I would suspect poor surface prep in the factory.

Don't forget that you do have the option to do nothing. By doing nothing you may find that the corroded spots cause the horn to fail in 427 years instead of 430 years from now, but you won't care.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That actually looks like someone has dipped the sax into a chem dip, when you dip exposed brasss into the dips they come up slightly pinkish in the exposed areas, those photos look very pinkish. Buffing the surface and recounting will fix all the problems, but not as easy as it sounds fo the average person to do

Steve
Yes, similar colour to that of flux covered areas of brass alter a dip in acid pickle following brazing.
I have access to a buffing wheel, I can try it gently on a key in a couple of weeks when I get to the workshop. If it cleans it, I would probably just put some wax on it as saxoclese has suggested and leave it at that.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'd be curious to know if it has been subject to a corrosive agent since manufacture, and if so, what it was.
Even some people's perspiration can be incredibly corrosive.
To take the zinc out of brass I believe an acid of some sort is most likely involved. That could be dampness in conjunction with an air pollutant eg sulphur dioxide, or even just an atmosphere rich in carbon dioxide, which with moisture makes carbonic acid.
An unflued gas heater could provide the right environment.


No clue regarding its storage history prior to last Saturday. It was owned by a lady who played it for a while in the eighties, then God knows how she's stored it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Given that most of the lacquer looks OK, I would suspect poor surface prep in the factory.

Don't forget that you do have the option to do nothing. By doing nothing you may find that the corroded spots cause the horn to fail in 427 years instead of 430 years from now, but you won't care.
I have to give it at least a rinse and an oil change . The pink colour doesn't bother me but I've just noticed some green fluff around a couple of springs, that's clear corrosion and I'd rather clean it up properly.
 

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iPad autocorrect = recoating
Thanks. That makes more sense. My hat is off to you if you can do a good job of buffing and lacquering specific areas to make them blend well with the surrounding previously lacquered surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
saxophones are lacquered without the keys on (otherwise they would cease) see this video of Selmer production Around 3’ 14”, keys and horns are lacquered separately ( but in the same station)
Now if the spraying had some irregularities ( the lacquer mix not being well made at that point) it will affect a number of saxophones and their parts.
Yes, I meant at the same time, but certainly not with the keys on. Thanks for the video!
 

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Don't want to derail the thread, but I will anyway. I thought that Selmers in the 50s and 60s, the ones in the US, were lacquered after assembly? That is, the keys were on the horn when the final lacquer was applied. The reason I think this is that the lacquer also appears on the original pads, up to where they hit the tone hole. I think Matt Stohrer mentions something about this on one of his many videos.
 

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super action 80 II are certainly lacquered as shown in the video.
 
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