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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where are good places to purchase cork?

I need to replace neck cork. All set with ebay, thanks...
 

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You can get either natural/real cork or you can get synthetic cork. Natural is sold mostly in sheets, unless the company your buying from cuts it for different need. Synthetic cork can be purchased for the exact task you need and sometines comes on a sheet with the glue already on. Just peel and stick.

I don't like to blantly advertise my company on here too much, so forgive the long answer above. If you have any questions, let me know.
 

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Good cork...good luck!

The cork "crop" of the last several years has been god awful, even Music Medic or Ferree's will tell you that.

The best thing I've done recently is buy premium thicker cork that is not sold as much, thus older stock, and shave it to the thickness required.
 

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Typically these days, cork sheet has many holes that have been filled. The filling is now reasonably successful, at least from some suppliers, but looks pretty awful once cork grease is applied. The grease highlights the filled areas with a darker colour.

If you order unfilled cork, it will likely be of doubtful qualty, or horrendously expensive.

I wonder if the decent cork is being used up for cork pads which have become fashionable for clarinets. It is also used as a laminate at the end of a wine cork to reduce the chance of the wine becoming tainted ('corked'). Roll on screw-cap wine, which is now the norm for NZ wine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks all...i am getting a bunch of sheet cork from one of the recommendations...aside from the neck i hope to fiddle around with other parts including palm keys and anything that wears out down the road...also down the road if the quality is not up to par, i will try finding the premium older thicker cork...i have no problem shaving a bit...thanks again !
 

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"The best thing I've done recently is buy premium thicker cork that is not sold as much, thus older stock, and shave it to the thickness required."

IMHO, although it sounds OK, it will not make a scrap of difference. Crappy cork has been the standard offering for a long time now. One could equally well say that the old stock has already had the eyes picked out of it, and has also now gone brittle with age.

In my experience, what you get is a lottery, unless it is filled, which is not such a lottery from a reliable supplier, and since they improved the filling methods only a few years ago.

The best cork, unfilled, especially if it is thicker, used to cost several tens of dollars per sheet. Although so-called high quality is still offered now, and the price is very high, in my experience it is what used to be called rather mediocre cork, i.e. AA, not AAAA, in old terminology.

BTW, IMO as I have stated here before, with the advent of new materials that are very good, there is seldom a location other than tenons where natural cork is still the best material.
 

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"IMHO, although it sounds OK, it will not make a scrap of difference. Crappy cork has been the standard offering for a long time now. One could equally well say that the old stock has already had the eyes picked out of it, and has also now gone brittle with age."

Simply incorrect, I have sheets of 3/16ths thickness, absolutely top quality natural cork purchased from Music Medic this year, call Curt if you need some.

Another excellent source;
http://www.novitasrosas.com/siteseng.swf
 

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Simon Weiner said:
You can get either natural/real cork or you can get synthetic cork. Natural is sold mostly in sheets, unless the company your buying from cuts it for different need. Synthetic cork can be purchased for the exact task you need and sometines comes on a sheet with the glue already on. Just peel and stick.
I have not found a synthetic cork that works for neck corks on saxes; that was the original question in this thread.

Peel and stick is great for quick fixes, but I have never seen one that hangs on for more than a few hours of playing.
 

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RandyJ said:
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Simply incorrect, I have sheets of 3/16ths thickness, absolutely top quality natural cork purchased from Music Medic this year, call Curt if you need some.

Another excellent source;
http://www.novitasrosas.com/siteseng.swf
Is your Musicmedic sheet filled? Are you sure of your answer?

I have bought and had samples from Novitasrosas, a few years ago. Inexplicably, in spite of very rosy advertising, a good proportion of the sheets were unusable. I hope supplies from there are now more reliable.

I am quite happy with the agglomerated cork I bought there, and other places over the last few decades, except for Ferrees!!

It seems that Novitasrosas is one of only two sources for natural sheet cork that our stockists offer in other countries.

Prices are good, and a very good variety of thicknesses for agglomerated cork. Accurate communication in English has presented a challenge at times.
 

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sod9728 said:
So you personally use synthetic cork?
For tenons I use only natural cork.

On keys and linkages:

I often use top quality, neoprene-based agglomerated cork - NOT your typical gasket cork, or Ferrees!! (I think Musicmedic stocks one sort.)

I use high density wool felt occasionally, but much more often, an even more stable synthetic felt (Kraus stocks it).

And sometimes laminates of felt and the above 'composite' cork.
In some locations, Teflon film, usually laminated to another material.
I gave up Sorbothane.

Occasionally I use Kraus 'synthetic cork', which is not cork at all.

More often on other woodwinds, I use a superior, synthetic alternative to pad leather, sold by Music Center as Microfiber.

Choices of material and thickness are made depending on location and function.

Using only natural cork today, in my opinion could be likened to steadfastly using soot as a toothpaste, or Vaseline for any type of wound or infection. This is the 21st century, with a huge range of outstanding materials available.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
Typically these days, cork sheet has many holes that have been filled. The filling is now reasonably successful, at least from some suppliers, but looks pretty awful once cork grease is applied. The grease highlights the filled areas with a darker colour.
Is it just you or did you actually have customers complain about it? I don't know if what I use is the new filling or not but I've never heard anyone complain about how the cork looks.

Gordon (NZ) said:
I wonder if the decent cork is being used up for cork pads which have become fashionable for clarinets. It is also used as a laminate at the end of a wine cork to reduce the chance of the wine becoming tainted ('corked'). Roll on screw-cap wine, which is now the norm for NZ wine.
AFAIK cork (and probably a lot of it) is used also for cricket balls. I've heard it is "top quality" cork but it is possible the person who said it didn't know what he was talking about.
The cork on keys on my Buffet bass clarinet is probably the best quality natural cork I've seen. It looks as good as or better than cork pads cork. They probably get much lower prices though.
 

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clarnibass said:
...Is it just you or did you actually have customers complain about it? I don't know if what I use is the new filling or not but I've never heard anyone complain about how the cork looks.....
My customers don't complain, but I just think the irregular patchy look draws attention to itself, as the only visually scruffy part for a quality instrument. It is embarrassing to my standards of workmanship.

Perhaps I am more sensitive to it because I recall the days when I corked tenons with unfilled cork that was close to pad cork in quality. Any holes rarely exceeded .5 mm in diameter, and many sheets had no holes at all.

About the only time I see tenon cork approaching that now is on some oboe tenons.
 

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"Is your Musicmedic sheet filled? Are you sure of your answer?"

With over 30 years of purchasing corks of all types in volume I'm quite sure.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
I use top quality, neoprene-based agglomerated cork - NOT your typical gasket cork, or Ferrees!! (I think Musicmedic stocks one sort.)
I agree that Ferree's stuff is unsuitable. I also use the neoprene stuff, but still use natural cork for neck corks, as I find the neoprene needs to be fitted quite accurately, and it is therefore unsuitable for any horn that needs to accept more than 'the one' mouthpiece.

Gordon, do you use the agglomerated (love that word!) cork for necks?
 
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Gordon (NZ) said:
... Roll on screw-cap wine, which is now the norm for NZ wine.
Bonny Doon vineyards have been extolling the vitues of screw on caps for years here in the states. It's definitely the best way to seal a bottle ! But backwards thinkers here in the U.S. are slow to warm up to this simple but obvious fact. It makes it hard for me to find their wines with the screw on cap, as retailers are reluctant to stock the capped wines.
 

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shmuelyosef said:
Gordon, do you use the agglomerated (love that word!) cork for necks?
NEVER!!! Never for any tenons, unles the groove is far too deep, in which case I use some thin agglomerated as a substrate for the natural cork.

I love that word too. I've even learnt how to spell it. Amazing that it is actually in the spell checker too.
 

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Update to my posts 6, 8, 12:

I emailed Curt at Musicmedic.
From what he said (and I have no reason to disbelieve it), I am now convinced that the cork sheet he sells is as good as it gets, and unlikely to be "filled".

And knowing Curt, the price is likely to be as reasonable as it gets too.

I guess it's how you negotiate with the producer that is important. :)
 
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