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I have a typical soprano straight neck, and two mouthpieces I usually play on( a rubber Meyer, and a ottolink metal. The Meyer was too small, and would scrape off some cork, so I used the ottolink mainly. After getting it repaired, the cork was replaced, and the now the ottolink bore is too large for the smaller cork size. So my question is, outside of replacing the cork, is there anything I can do to hold the ottolink in place?
 

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Wrap the cork in teflon tape.
 

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Anything which will make it fit and not leak will do, but my question is this;

Why not just have it recorked to fit the Link if it is the one you prefer? Most techs do this while you wait. Sounds like the tech who replaced the cork fit it to the Meyer, as perhaps you did not specify which one you required when you dropped it off. (I would have asked the player, but that's just me.) Another question is, were you only using the Link because it fit the cork prior, or do you like that mouthpiece better anyway? I might suggest deciding (if this is possible) which you prefer and have the natural cork fit/replaced accordingly. But...

fwiw - We have had terrific success using the Kraus black synthetic cork as it has excellent memory and fast expansion. This is ideal when a player has two mouthpieces which have different bore sizes, and likes to use both often. There are extremes in which this will not apply, but they are few. This material also responds best if you do not leave the mouthipece on the neck while in the case, as the down-time allows it to rejuvinate itself naturally. :D
 

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If the cork has simply been compressed - you can steam it over a kettle and it will return to it's original size.

Other than that, it's teflon tape or replacement-
 

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I just read a tip here - and tried it out successfully too. Put a piece of electrical tape inside the shank of the bigger mouthpiece.
 

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Carl H. said:
I just read a tip here - and tried it out successfully too. Put a piece of electrical tape inside the shank of the bigger mouthpiece.
Isn't that going to come detached after a couple of plays + v difficult to attach accurately? My preferred option is masking tape on the neck and replace each time. I'm not entirely sure what "teflon tape" is ?
 

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Teflon tape is plumbers tape. It is for sealing up threaded pipe joints.

A good quality electrical tape won't pull away for quite a while. I have some very nice vinyl tape I used this past week and it did the job easier inside the mouthpiece than the teflon tape on the cork - and the piece the cork is fitted for goes on without removing the teflon.
 

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JerryJamz2 said:
fwiw - We have had terrific success using the Kraus black synthetic cork as it has excellent memory and fast expansion. This is ideal when a player has two mouthpieces which have different bore sizes, and likes to use both often. There are extremes in which this will not apply, but they are few. This material also responds best if you do not leave the mouthipece on the neck while in the case, as the down-time allows it to rejuvinate itself naturally. :D
Have never tried this for sax necks. How is it to glue and sand?

John
 

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I gave it up for general use on keys, because it does not glue as well as alternatives. Kraus acknowledges issues with gluing.

And it is damaged by solvents such as acetone, which I sometimes use for cleaning keys.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
I gave it up for general use on keys, because it does not glue as well as alternatives. Kraus acknowledges issues with gluing.

And it is damaged by solvents such as acetone, which I sometimes use for cleaning keys.
Even with your beloved evostik? :shock: :D Interesting. We use barge cement w/o any problems here. We also use fairly coarse (220 grit) sandpaper to prepare the synthetic cork surface beforehand.
 

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hgrail said:
If the cork has simply been compressed - you can steam it over a kettle and it will return to it's original size.

Other than that, it's teflon tape or replacement-
I was on my way to pay for a re cork on my extra neck when I read this . It worked perfectly thanks.
 
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