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Discussion Starter #1
I have an interesting sort of problem. My old 1957 Zephyr has a very thin neck cork, which I believe was placed there by my repairman. Now, that fits my vintage Brilhart Ebolin very well, as it seems to have a very small bore (I'm referring to the part that the neck enters, not the chamber), but when I went to put another, more standard mouthpiece (a stock Selmer), it seemed to have a much larger bore (again, the part that the neck enters), and the entire mouthpiece wobbled around on the sax's neck neck, spinning and falling off freely. It was simply too large for my neck cork. The vice versa applies here as well (although I'm not sure how frequently, as I only tested one other sax), as I was unable to push my Brilhart far enough on a modern sax's neck (ie. a Selmer La Voix) to bring it into tune (the La Voix seems to have a much thicker neck cork). Now, I know with my own sax, I could always wrap the cork with tape in order to fit a larger...I guess "shank" might be the word I want here...mouthpiece, but...how do I deal with the vice versa, for instance, particularly if it isn't my own sax that I want to use that mouthpiece on? And how am I going to go about trying a whole bunch of mouthpieces at WWBW in a few weeks with such a problem? I am in desperate need of suggestions! My thanks!!
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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As you now know, there is no 'standard' neck cork size or mouthpiece shank size. You can deal with a thin cork when trying out mouthpieces but not a thick one. However, a thick cork can be worked down to fit a small shank when you're sure you're changing to that mouthpiece. On the other hand, if you change to a larger-shank mouthpiece, you'll need a new cork. Wrapping the cork in Teflon tape or whatever is only good as an emergency fix until you can get the new cork fitted.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
But what if a new, thicker cork doesn't allow me to use my Brilhart?

Please keep answering.
 

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You can have the shank of the Brilhart (carefully) bored out by a good mpc tech, so that it matches your Selmer. On the more expensive end of the scale, you can get a spare neck, so that each neck is fitted to the appropriate mouthpiece. I'd take the first option.
 

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Jim Scimonetti (Lancaster, CA) makes a corkless neck that consists of several grooves machined into the neck and "O" rings placed in the grooves. A simple "O" ring change can accomodate all sorts of mouthpiece shanks. Do a search on SOTW. DAVE
 

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Plumbers teflon tape can bulk up a neck for a larger mouthpiece in a pinch.

Not the most beautiful solution - but it does work, it's removable, and cheap...
 

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I have a similar problem. My Barone piece literally dangles on the end of my Barone neck on my vi in order to be in tune. It's worse on my ref 54's neck. The piece almost falls off the neck. Rattles around.

Since I also use a Tenney slant sig on both horns, changing cork is not an option. (Another neck would be. Not in the budget just now.)

Painter's masking tape, the blue stuff solves the problem. But don't leave it on long. I think it's good for about two weeks. Comes right off without peeling of any cork or leaving any residue.
 

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I used to borrow a tenor from the Community Music Center here in San Francisco that had a very thin neck cork. I just put a small piece of paper around the cork and that let me pull my mouthpiece out far enough to be in tune. Later on, my teacher used that horn when he taught (he lives out of town and takes the train in every day), and he did the same thing. It works just fine.
 

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If you have an odd small shank bore mouthpiece, the shank can be enlarged. If you have an odd loose one, the shank can be coated inside with epoxy and sanded smooth to make it smaller in diameter.

For mouthpiece trials, a smallish cork and strips of paper are best. Teflon tape is cool, but not as easy to take off as paper.
 

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I strive to make any mouthpiece that I intend to keep (after jury-rigging a trial) interchangable on any of my horns (obviously within horn size...not alto pieces on bari). I use the procedures that Mojo suggests, and indeed, it was he that first encouraged me to be even more anal in this particular dimension.

Question...
Has anybody ever rigged a fixture to mount a mouthpiece on it's bore center on a lathe, so that this can be done more precisely than with moto-tools and sandpaper?
 

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hgrail said:
Plumbers teflon tape can bulk up a neck for a larger mouthpiece in a pinch.

Not the most beautiful solution - but it does work, it's removable, and cheap...
I second this one. It is indeed said to be an emergency solution. Getting the teflon on in such a way there is no spit collecting between the mouthpiece and the neck, is not that evident. But I used that trick on my bari when switching from my Berg (big bore) to the Selmer piece (smaller bore) and back. Teflon is however not that beneficial for your cork if you leave it on a long time, the cork can't breathe any more.

In the end I found out that I liked the Selmer piece better, so that way the problem solved itself.
 
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