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Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc and was invented because copper is so soft. I don't know if there are saxophones made of pure copper, but there probably are some of copper alloy - very similar to brass but with more copper.
 

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there are many copper saxophones out there which are sturdy enough and not much softer than any brass saxophone. Bronze is naturally another material and looks very different from copper.
Whatever your reasons are to go for copper , I personally would go for a lacquered copper since otherwise you horn will be soon changing colour developing a patina which will make it very different from the beautiful colour that it has when new.

The best known must be the one made for Buffet by Keilwerth , there is one for sale (not by me)
here http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?162198-FS-Buffet-Prestige-Alto-Saxophone-(Copper) .
https://picasaweb.google.com/scstusek/BuffetAltoSaxophone?authkey=Gv1sRgCL21rODWlNmb_QE

this is pitched in A=442 (don't worry about that, unless you are really picky few people would be able to hear any difference with one pitched in A=440 A=442 is not a high pitch horn)
 

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I recently repaired a brand new Yanagisawa copper tenor saxophone. I don't want to say anything bad about Yanagisawa. It is a great saxophone company. I once visited their factory and I was impressed, and their horns are some of the best in the world. However, I was amazed at how easily the copper could be manipulated. Even with ribbed construction, posts could be moved with little pressure. Unless the copper model of any saxophone plays much, much better than the brass model, I'd stay with brass.
 

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there are many copper saxophones out there which are sturdy enough and not much softer than any brass saxophone. Bronze is naturally another material and looks very different from copper.
Whatever your reasons are to go for copper , I personally would go for a lacquered copper since otherwise you horn will be soon changing colour developing a patina which will make it very different from the beautiful colour that it has when new.

The best known must be the one made for Buffet by Keilwerth , there is one for sale (not by me)
here http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?162198-FS-Buffet-Prestige-Alto-Saxophone-(Copper) .
https://picasaweb.google.com/scstusek/BuffetAltoSaxophone?authkey=Gv1sRgCL21rODWlNmb_QE

this is pitched in A=442 (don't worry about that, unless you are really picky few people would be able to hear any difference with one pitched in A=440 A=442 is not a high pitch horn)
Bronze is an alloy of copper and tin isn't it?
 

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... but there probably are some of copper alloy - very similar to brass but with more copper.
I believe these are the so-called "bronze" horns. For example the Bauhaus Walstein "pink bronze" models.
Bronze is naturally another material and looks very different from copper.
milandro, if you look closely at my post, you will see that I was responding to 1saxman's post, which I quoted, to indicate that bronze is an alloy with higher copper content than brass. I did not claim that bronze horns are made entirely of copper.
 

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and , in fact, I was responding to pikiwiki.........:bluewink:
When you wrote post #4 of this thread (from which I just quoted you in my post #10), pikiwiki hadn't posted anything yet. Since I was the one who brought up "bronze," and you immediately responded with "Bronze is naturally another material and looks very different from copper," I assumed you were, in part, responding to me. I just wanted my post interpreted in the context in which it was made.
 

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Just top clear things up a bit more:

Historically bronze is purely copper plus tin. These days it can have various different constituents.

The good folk of the bronze age discovered that by bunging tin in with copper, they got swords that were nice and sharp and did not bend when thrust into somebody.

Whatever the allow, bronze is very similar to brass (which as has bee said is an alloy basically of copper and zinc), but is less bendy.

Phosphor bronze just means that the alloy has phosphorous and is extremely common to the extent that if you went to a metal company and said "can I have a pound of bronze, please", you'd be given a lump of phosphor bronze. Presumably bronze has evolved with different metals in the alloy as they are cheaper than tin, but as long as it retains it's main property of being a copper alloy (that is stronger than brass), then it's basically bronze.
 

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I'm not sure, but I think that bronze saxes, when thrust into an opponent onstage, retain their shape better than pure copper saxes, which tend to bend. However, either type of saxophone, when carefully manipulated, can result in spectacular results in terms of bloodletting and stage presence. I recommend the use of more open mouthpieces, since the tips are sharper.
 

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:) on the other hand , most buyers of copper saxophones wouldn't necessarily use it as a baseball (or cricket :) ) bat and hardly ever bump it into things ( aside, perhaps, the occasional, and dangerous, close encounter with a music stand ). I reckon the mostly belong to the " classical " clan and tend to be rather controlled in their behaviour. I wouldn't necessarily recommend copper to a student.
 

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Why don't they use iron/stainless steel or aluminium?
 

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steel is difficult to bend in shape and near impossible to undent, besides, it is heavier than brass, aluminium is too soft and you can't undent it because it almost certainly cracks. At the time Sax made the saxophone, brass was the only material that could have been used without using pure silver which was expensive and heavy
 

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Are there actually other materials suitable for making saxophones, besides sterling silver, plastic, brass, bronze and copper?
 
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