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I was reviewing some instructions for replacing the neck cork and the instructions refer to using contact cement. Are they refering to any specific type of contact cement, or simply something I can pick up at a hobby store?
 

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it is fairly specific, order it from musicmedic.com, its amongst the cheapest i have found and US shipping is free
 

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You can use the stuff from a hobby or hardware store. It's the same thing, really.
 

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DAP Weldwood in the red labeled bottle (glass or plastic), available at most hardware stores (Ace, True-value, probably even the big boxes like WalMart). Another is the Barge contact cement you can buy by the tube at most any leather goods or shoe-repair store. These are two of the best, and lots of techs use these out of preference.
 

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I've tried several local contact glues adn they were good. I also tried a type called Evostik which I buy from www.windcraft.co.uk (I think it's made in UK) and it better than other contact glues I've tried. Some use contact glue in a can (and not in a tube) which seems much less comfortable to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses, I was pretty sure that it was something I could purchase locally. I just wanted to make sure because this will be my first repair job of any kind. I know it's very elementary to you repair guys, thats why I know you can fix it when I screw up. :D
 

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Most solvent based contact cements are basically the same. The brands above are all good. Formica also makes a good solvent based contact cement. There's really nothing specific about it. :? Just stay clear of the water based contact cements. Inferior hold and longer drying times. If it cleans up with water, you don't want it. Hardware stores, Home Centers, Lumber Yards, etc. the stuff's available almost anywhere.
 

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I just changed my tenor cork yesterday. I used the DAP Weldwood red label stuff I got from the hardware store. Perfect job, Im happy. Oddly, I had to go to three stores to find the stuff. Do yourself a favor, go to a hardware store first! Seems everyone is busy stocking the latest and greatest ten dollar an oz glue and dont bother to stock good ole contact cement.
 

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Is that the stuff that should not be used on copper or brass?
 

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I have no idea why Weldwood is not recommended for copper-based metals.

BTW, although many different brands of contact adhesive are OK for tenon corks, rather fewer of them are suitable from the very small areas of key cork, where glue that has a degree of "creep" allows corks/felts to creep off the keys. In this respect, Evostik is outstanding. Possibly only readily available in UK.

Applying contact glue thinly (and hence placing surfaces together a lot sooner) results in a thinner glue line and less creep. I do not use a brush, but rather a finger, in order to apply evenly and thinly.
 

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LBAjazz said:
Weldwood says on the bottle not to use it on metals containing copper. I'm not sure why that is.
Uh-oh, then I better retract my recommendation until I can learn more about that (I had read it before but it slipped my mind). Lots of people are using this stuff and I've not experienced any problems with it to date. Certainly provides a very tough, durable bond. Must be concern about a reaction with the copper. Think I'll give the maker a call.

........ Called the 1-888-DAP-TIPS line and asked. They explained that DAP Original Contact Cement can attack and weaken the metal if it contains copper. The person I spoke with couldn't say "why." I suspect it might be the acetone in the product. (http://www.sunysb.edu/vescalab/research/research7.html) I've used it on several horns (mine and others I've sold). Can't say about the horns that are gone, but I suppose I can scrape the cork off a neck or two and see if anything has really happened. Naaaaaah.
 

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Very timely thread. 2 questions-

For those in the states, what is a recommended brand - and what brands are to be avoided?

Gordon, does the adhesive roll off your fingers or does it need to be scrubbed off with a solvent?
 

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Carl H. I use the same contact glue as Gordon (Evostik) and also spread it with my finger (because it's much more comfortable) and I take it off my finger by, hmm... I don't know how it is called in English but it is touching my hands with each other and move them (we have a word for that in my language which I have no idea how to translate). Sometimes I will wash with soap and scrub and that will help too. If a little is left on my finger, I simply don't mind :)
 

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Thanks cb, but Evostik isn't available in the states. I have used several different products in the past (once every 8 - 10 years) with greatly differing rates of success. I was hoping to buy one bottle/tube and not worry about migrating cork and felt.

I call glue removal "rolling boogers" if all you need to do is rub your fingers together to get it to ball up and flick it into the waste bin.
 

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Carl H. said:
I call glue removal "rolling boogers" if all you need to do is rub your fingers together to get it to ball up and flick it into the waste bin.
My words exactly. (I also do that with the non-contact-cement specipeople). Thankfully my mom isn't reading this forum... :D

FWIW (to add some useful content): I use a properly cut decommissioned reed to spread the goo. Works as good as your finger, but it it looks ever so professional.
 

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tictactux said:
FWIW (to add some useful content): I use a properly cut decommissioned reed to spread the goo. Works as good as your finger, but it it looks ever so professional.
They also work well for removing excess cork grease and other crud which builds up on clarinet tenons. Nice little scrapers.
 

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Carl H. said:
Very timely thread. 2 questions-

For those in the states, what is a recommended brand - and what brands are to be avoided?

Gordon, does the adhesive roll off your fingers or does it need to be scrubbed off with a solvent?
As Clarnibass says, I rub my finger in the palm of my hand. This usually rolls it up into balls which fall off. (I wipe any thick deposits off first with tissue).

BTW, I think somebody once said that Evostik is available in USA in some hobby shops.
 

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I suppose it is possible that the acetone-copper reaction is the problem, but this occurs only in the presence of light, and the article on it seems to be about a bath of acetone.

When re-corking, only a very small amount of the glue is involved, most of the solvent evaporates very quickly, what is left presumably does not linger for much longer, and while it is lingering, it is not exposed to light.

Hmm.
 
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