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Im a new 43 year old student. I have been playing an Amati super classic alto on my own for about a year and have recently been taking lessons. I’ve realized the tenor is really what I want to play and my instructor told me that it makes no difference which I play but recommended Continuing with the sax I am truly interested in. I am seriously considering a new Yamaha yts-480. My question, is there others in that price range I should be looking at. Im interested in new as I don’t have anyone to look at a used one unless perhaps its from a shop that has gone over it.

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You don't say what your budget is. But for a few extra dollars I would suggest the YTS-62. The YTS-480 is an intermediate horn, it's still an excellent horn but the 62 is a professional level instrument and is approx $500.00 more and has better re-sale value. I own a YAS-62 and YTS-875 and both are excellent horns. You should talk to your instructor and get his opinion as well.
 

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I would agree on going straight to the YTS-62. This is a beautiful instrument to play and worth the price difference from the YTS-480. This is especially true if, like me, you plan to hold onto the sax for the long term.

I rented a YTS-280 for a bit to get a guage on a student level instrument, then play tested a YTS-480 and YTS-62 and bought the 62 with no regrets at all. I will likely not have to buy another tenor, this one is good enough to see me out (late starter and just turned 58).

I would definitely recommend play testing a YTS-62 beforehand. Just take your wallet with you when you do. 😁
 

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Couple of items:

1). If you are playing a vintage Amati. (I am assuming it is vintage) and like the sound, why do you want to get a new Yamaha? I would expect the sound to be very different.

2). I don’t know the Amati sax well, but I hear an Amati tuba playing in my house every week. It blends very well with my 1958 Conn (tenor sax).....not so much my Selmer Mark VII or anything with a more contemporary sound. For example, it sounds way better with my son’s vintage Conn 88 trombone than it does with his 1980’s King. That Amati is incredibly warm - and I am guessing that just like Conn, Amati had a characteristic sound across all of their instruments. (I could be wrong).

3). If you want a new horn with a vintage sound (which is what i guess you are getting with your Amati), I would seriously consider a P. Mauriat tenor as it has that vintage sound plus the benefit of modern keywork. They don’t have the reputation of Yamaha, and will cost much less. If you are interested in Vintage and like the Amati sound, a pre-1958 Conn is probably also going to serve you well, will cost potentially less than a Yamaha and likely preserve its value better.....though I will say that either the Yamaha or P. Mauriat is going to have faster fingerings.

Lots of people think that Yamaha’s are flexible instruments which can be used with a lot of genres....and that they are made very, very consistently. I personally find their sound to be rather uninteresting. (Polite way of saying dead/dull).....In short, you are wise to ask whether you should consider something other than a Yamaha.
 

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Couple of items:

1). If you are playing a vintage Amati. (I am assuming it is vintage) and like the sound, why do you want to get a new Yamaha? I would expect the sound to be very different.

2). I don’t know the Amati sax well, but I hear an Amati tuba playing in my house every week. It blends very well with my 1958 Conn (tenor sax).....not so much my Selmer Mark VII or anything with a more contemporary sound. For example, it sounds way better with my son’s vintage Conn 88 trombone than it does with his 1980’s King. That Amati is incredibly warm - and I am guessing that just like Conn, Amati had a characteristic sound across all of their instruments. (I could be wrong).

3). If you want a new horn with a vintage sound (which is what i guess you are getting with your Amati), I would seriously consider a P. Mauriat tenor as it has that vintage sound plus the benefit of modern keywork. They don’t have the reputation of Yamaha, and will cost much less. If you are interested in Vintage and like the Amati sound, a pre-1958 Conn is probably also going to serve you well, will cost potentially less than a Yamaha and likely preserve its value better.....though I will say that either the Yamaha or P. Mauriat is going to have faster fingerings.

Lots of people think that Yamaha’s are flexible instruments which can be used with a lot of genres....and that they are made very, very consistently. I personally find their sound to be rather uninteresting. (Polite way of saying dead/dull).....In short, you are wise to ask whether you should consider something other than a Yamaha.
Nonsense.
 

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Couple of items:

1). If you are playing a vintage Amati. (I am assuming it is vintage) and like the sound, why do you want to get a new Yamaha? I would expect the sound to be very different.
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He's currently playing an Amati alto and wants to get a tenor.

I will agree with what's already be said. Look to jump into the 62 for just a little more. Hopefully you can play one and maybe bring your instructor along if you happen upon a used one.
 

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I would agree on going straight to the YTS-62. This is a beautiful instrument to play and worth the price difference from the YTS-480. This is especially true if, like me, you plan to hold onto the sax for the long term.

I rented a YTS-280 for a bit to get a guage on a student level instrument, then play tested a YTS-480 and YTS-62 and bought the 62 with no regrets at all. I will likely not have to buy another tenor, this one is good enough to see me out (late starter and just turned 58).

I would definitely recommend play testing a YTS-62 beforehand. Just take your wallet with you when you do. 😁
I will expand on my prior comments, I was in almost this exact situation earlier this year, an alto player (YAS-23) wanting to try tenor. I went down the track of renting a tenor to see if it worked for me. I would definitely recommend this, or better still if you have someone you can loan one from. If you have already tried and have been bitten by the tenor bug, then I would say keep going! 😁

As to the question of Yamaha or not, I only encouraged the YTS-62 option because the OP made suggestions in that direction. I still stand by the idea of going for a YTS-62 if the OP likes the Yamaha family of instruments and what they provide. I don't have much experience of other brands, I'm sure there are plenty of other options to look at.

I've had no regrets taking on tenor on top of alto, both Yamaha instruments and both fine for my needs (although a YAS-62 might be my ultimate alto upgrade). YMMV
 

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Nonsense.
If I am not mistaken, the OP is asking about alternatives to the YTS-480.....and nearly everyone else on this thread is telling him that his only option is Yamaha YTS-62. I thought a different perspective would be helpful. (Hence: Conn or P. Mauriat). Not everyone loves Yammy.....and the OP does not currently play a Yammy. I don't mean they are bad horns...I just means they don't fit everyone....

For an entire thread to tell a beginner that the only option is a Yamaha, is really not very helpful. It is not necessarily the wrong way for him to go. In fact, it might be the right way for him to go....but it is definitely limiting advice. He has lots of options and he should try out a few brands.

When making the purchase of a new horn, someone is spending a lot of money. It is not fair for everyone to simply tell someone that they should get a Yammy.

I am so glad that when I purchased my last horn, I sat down and tried Yammy's and Dolnet's, and Conn's and P. Mauriat's and Selmer's and Cannonball's, etc.

......and when I purchased the last trombone for my son, I am so glad he tried Olds, and Conn, and Bach, and Yamaha and King.......His band teacher was desperate for him the get a Yamaha....but when when he blew into that Conn 88H, his face just lit up. That is what it is like, especially for a beginner.

I haven't price shopped P. Mauriat and Yamaha Tenors since last year...so if my pricing information is outdated (as they were about $1,000 cheaper when I was shopping), I am simply wrong on pricing....but clearly P. Mauriat still fits the OP need as is in the Yamaha price range.
 

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If I am not mistaken, the OP is asking about alternatives to the YTS-480.....and nearly everyone else on this thread is telling him that his only option is Yamaha YTS-62. I thought a different perspective would be helpful. (Hence: Conn or P. Mauriat). Not everyone loves Yammy.....and the OP does not currently play a Yammy. I don't mean they are bad horns...I just means they don't fit everyone....

For an entire thread to tell a beginner that the only option is a Yamaha, is really not very helpful. It is not necessarily the wrong way for him to go. In fact, it might be the right way for him to go....but it is definitely limiting advice. He has lots of options and he should try out a few brands.

When making the purchase of a new horn, someone is spending a lot of money. It is not fair for everyone to simply tell someone that they should get a Yammy.

I am so glad that when I purchased my last horn, I sat down and tried Yammy's and Dolnet's, and Conn's and P. Mauriat's and Selmer's and Cannonball's, etc.

......and when I purchased the last trombone for my son, I am so glad he tried Olds, and Conn, and Bach, and Yamaha and King.......His band teacher was desperate for him the get a Yamaha....but when when he blew into that Conn 88H, his face just lit up. That is what it is like, especially for a beginner.

I haven't price shopped P. Mauriat and Yamaha Tenors since last year...so if my pricing information is outdated (as they were about $1,000 cheaper when I was shopping), I am simply wrong on pricing....but clearly P. Mauriat still fits the OP need as is in the Yamaha price range.
Well it seems clear to me you are mistaken. First off, it was the OP's inquiry about purchasing a Yamaha 480. And the responses he received were in direct correlation to that. Then, you implied that he was looking to achieve a vintage sound, when there was absolutely no mention of that in his original post. Then you proceeded with more nonsense about how an Amati tuba's sound blended great with your 58 Conn tenor. What exactly does that have to do with the OP's search for a new tenor? Did he say he was looking to start a tuba-sax duo? I've never played an Amati, but I know they are just a cheap run of the mill brand made for WWBW and I can only assume that most "vintage" Amati's eventually get screwed to a wall in some blues bar.

Let's face it, you clicked on this thread because for some reason you don't like Yamaha's and you thought you would interject as to discourage the OP. That's fine, he should have food for thought, there are a lot of nice horns on the market and he should be aware of them all. I would only discourage him from getting anything vintage, because as a new player he doesn't need to deal with manipulating a horn to get it to play in tune, plus the inferior ergonomics and the costly trips to the repair shop, all of that very discouraging for a new player. I had many vintage horns in my day, and the best move I've made was to move on to modern horns that play in tune, have the best key-work and don't send me to the repair shop every three months. And lastly, I'm sick of hearing that Yamaha horns are too pitch perfect and so they don't have any color, or they're not versatile enough for every situation. BS, my sound has always been my own on whatever horn I've played, the only difference being, now I don't have to fight my instrument to play what I want to play.
 

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Couple of items:

1). If you are playing a vintage Amati. (I am assuming it is vintage) and like the sound, why do you want to get a new Yamaha? I would expect the sound to be very different.

2). I don’t know the Amati sax well, but I hear an Amati tuba playing in my house every week. It blends very well with my 1958 Conn (tenor sax).....not so much my Selmer Mark VII or anything with a more contemporary sound. For example, it sounds way better with my son’s vintage Conn 88 trombone than it does with his 1980’s King. That Amati is incredibly warm - and I am guessing that just like Conn, Amati had a characteristic sound across all of their instruments. (I could be wrong).

3). If you want a new horn with a vintage sound (which is what i guess you are getting with your Amati), I would seriously consider a P. Mauriat tenor as it has that vintage sound plus the benefit of modern keywork. They don’t have the reputation of Yamaha, and will cost much less. If you are interested in Vintage and like the Amati sound, a pre-1958 Conn is probably also going to serve you well, will cost potentially less than a Yamaha and likely preserve its value better.....though I will say that either the Yamaha or P. Mauriat is going to have faster fingerings.

Lots of people think that Yamaha’s are flexible instruments which can be used with a lot of genres....and that they are made very, very consistently. I personally find their sound to be rather uninteresting. (Polite way of saying dead/dull).....In short, you are wise to ask whether you should consider something other than a Yamaha.
I am actually going to jump in here and agree with this. It is by no means an invalid comment.

Amatis still possessed the old-school German school sort of tone, a la Keilwerth, B&S, Kohlert. Dark, warm, wide are some semantical descriptors often used. That is a very different sort of tone than a Yamaha (even their top shelfers).

So if a particular tonality is an important quality on Justinhip's checklist, then yeah...for the price point of the Yama480 there actually ARE some other brands which MAY in fact possess the sonic attributes which eclipse a Yama.

Keep on mind, Yamas are usually the default suggestion many folks make. But a default suggestion isn't necessarily the best suggestion when one takes into account the priorities and desires of a particular player.

If I am not mistaken, the OP is asking about alternatives to the YTS-480.....and nearly everyone else on this thread is telling him that his only option is Yamaha YTS-62. I thought a different perspective would be helpful.
Again, a valid observation, because in fact, literally every other respondent IS suggesting the 62. So to suggest that Yamaha may not be the obvious choice...I'd call that addressing the OP's query.

Well it seems clear to me you are mistaken. First off, it was the OP's inquiry about purchasing a Yamaha 480.
Actually, no, that characterization is mistaken. If one re-reads the OP, one sees the member is also inquiring as to other model suggestions:
Im a new 43 year old student. I have been playing an Amati super classic alto on my own for about a year and have recently been taking lessons. I’ve realized the tenor is really what I want to play and my instructor told me that it makes no difference which I play but recommended Continuing with the sax I am truly interested in. I am seriously considering a new Yamaha yts-480. My question, is there others in that price range I should be looking at [?] I'm interested in new as I don’t have anyone to look at a used one unless perhaps its from a shop that has gone over it.
So pointing out that sonically a Mauriat may be closer to an Amati than a Yama is...that's reasonable.

A Yamaha 62III will cost less than a P. Mauriat 66 or 76 according to Sax Alley's site.
While true....actually a Mauriat 'intermediate' model like a LeBravo or 56 ranges from around $2100-3000....while a 62III costs around $33-3400ish.
Is it accurate to compare the price of a top-shelf Mauriat models to the price of the one-shelf down model Yama ? Compare one-shelf-down to one-shelf-down, no ?

Let's face it, you clicked on this thread because for some reason you don't like Yamaha's and you thought you would interject as to discourage the OP.
That's quite a presumption, no ??? Bj seems to have already addressed his reason for replying in his above quoted snippet...

IMHO......$2500 ain't small change, even for a new horn purchase. So, yeah...one comes to a forum to tap into suggestions which may expand their considerations.

I will throw in another one you, Justinhip, may wish to consider: Buffet 400. Both their 400 and 100 models were designed/created to produce a warmer, rounder tone that the brighter contemporary tone which I feel, as Bjroosevelt does, is exemplified by Yamahas. Also having serviced a few of these, I can attest they are very respectably made instruments. So there's another one you may wanna consider.

One more: Jupiter 1100 series. I cannot necessarily say I make this suggestion based on tonal signature (although IMHO this model sounds AS good as a good Yama), but more because it is my general feeling that at this point Jupiter's non-student lines have actually equaled and even arguably eclipsed Yamaha's second and third shelf lines of horns in pretty much every aspect including build quality.

So if someone were to ask me ..."it has been suggested I buy a new Yama 480; any other suggestions ?" (hey wait, that's EXACTLY what you asked, ain't it ?:bluewink:)....I would put the Jupe 1100 on that list as well.
 

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I am actually going to jump in here and agree with this. It is by no means an invalid comment.

Amatis still possessed the old-school German school sort of tone, a la Keilwerth, B&S, Kohlert. Dark, warm, wide are some semantical descriptors often used. That is a very different sort of tone than a Yamaha (even their top shelfers).

So if a particular tonality is an important quality on Justinhip's checklist, then yeah...for the price point of the Yama480 there actually ARE some other brands which MAY in fact possess the sonic attributes which eclipse a Yama.

Keep on mind, Yamas are usually the default suggestion many folks make. But a default suggestion isn't necessarily the best suggestion when one takes into account the priorities and desires of a particular player.


Again, a valid observation, because in fact, literally every other respondent IS suggesting the 62. So to suggest that Yamaha may not be the obvious choice...I'd call that addressing the OP's query.

Actually, no, that characterization is mistaken. If one re-reads the OP, one sees the member is also inquiring as to other model suggestions:


So pointing out that sonically a Mauriat may be closer to an Amati than a Yama is...that's reasonable.

While true....actually a Mauriat 'intermediate' model like a LeBravo or 56 ranges from around $2100-3000....while a 62III costs around $33-3400ish.
Is it accurate to compare the price of a top-shelf Mauriat models to the price of the one-shelf down model Yama ? Compare one-shelf-down to one-shelf-down, no ?

That's quite a presumption, no ??? Bj seems to have already addressed his reason for replying in his above quoted snippet...

IMHO......$2500 ain't small change, even for a new horn purchase. So, yeah...one comes to a forum to tap into suggestions which may expand their considerations.

I will throw in another one you, Justinhip, may wish to consider: Buffet 400. Both their 400 and 100 models were designed/created to produce a warmer, rounder tone that the brighter contemporary tone which I feel, as Bjroosevelt does, is exemplified by Yamahas. Also having serviced a few of these, I can attest they are very respectably made instruments. So there's another one you may wanna consider.

One more: Jupiter 1100 series. I cannot necessarily say I make this suggestion based on tonal signature (although IMHO this model sounds AS good as a good Yama), but more because it is my general feeling that at this point Jupiter's non-student lines have actually equaled and even arguably eclipsed Yamaha's second and third shelf lines of horns in pretty much every aspect including build quality.

So if someone were to ask me ..."it has been suggested I buy a new Yama 480; any other suggestions ?" (hey wait, that's EXACTLY what you asked, ain't it ?:bluewink:)....I would put the Jupe 1100 on that list as well.
Oh well, there are assumptions all around here. First off you and BJ are assuming the OP is enamored with the Amati that he's playing now. There is no mention of how he came by that horn or if he even likes it, it could have been pushed on him by a sales person or given by a friend. I just responded to the OP's query concerning the YTS-480, let me see, what were his words?
"I am seriously considering a new Yamaha yts-480. My question, is there others in that price range I should be looking at. " The 62 is a step up and not that far out of his price range from the 480. Was there a reason he asked about a Yamaha 480? Did he try one? Someone suggested it? We don't know because he didn't say. I also mentioned that he seek advice from his instructor, for he knows his students level as well as his current sound and is more apt to point him in the right direction (if he's a qualified sax instructor). I have no problem with P. Mauriat, Cannonball, Yanagisawa or any other modern horn, but I would never suggest for a beginner to purchase a vintage horn. Normally, my suggestion for any new player would be to try as many brands as possible, but again he specifically asked about the Yamaha. And just how tuba's and trombone's factor into this discussion, I'll never know ...
 
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