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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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8,588 Posts
My.... Perhaps Conn didn't have a sop back then and needed someone to make stencil?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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7,107 Posts
IIRC, Conn actually didn't start making C sops until 1922. A 60xxx Buescher would date to 1919.
What's mystifying is doing engraving over the serial stamps. It looks awful. Could it have been an apprentice's work?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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21,033 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have a sopranino that came from the Conn Elkhart factory when they closed and it has the serial number, True-tone emblem and nothing else. The horn in the auction does not have True-tone. I'll go with the no C soprano before that serial number idea.
 

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Forum Contributor 2012, SOTW Saxophone Whisperer,
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3,209 Posts
How does the dates compare with the time frame when Conn and Buescher split and became 2 companies? Could of this been one of the horns that was part of the transition?
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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8,588 Posts
I wasn't aware they were ever the same company prior to the acquisition of Conn by Selmer USA in the '80s.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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7,107 Posts
Gus Buescher worked for Conn from 1876, designed their first saxes around 1888, then left in 1894 to start his own company.

The timeframe on this horn is years later.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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8,588 Posts
Ok. I know that story, but it was opined that it was the same company then broke apart into two different ones. Might be splitting hairs here from a philosophical perspective, but from a legal one they were never the same company until they merged nearly 90 years later.
 
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