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And cheap too! I have actually seen a Conn Alto from the late 19th Century, double octave key, high Eb that was a C. G.Conn made in Connecticut (I forget the town, New Haven comes to mind.), all engraved on the Bell. Who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Looks like a Conn neck, pulled down. Too much dancing?
 

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Appears to be a Conn C-Melody. Judging from the serial#, it's from approx 1920-1921.
The seller is obviously clueless as to what he's got. The logo painted on the case seems to merely suggest that it was once owned by someone in the Manhattan Dance Orchestra.
For the record...I enlarged the photo with the patent # and serial #. Still a little blurry, but these appear to be the stats...

Patent (1914) #1119954
C (for C Melody)
serial# 60511

Others here would be much more able to estimate the value than I.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wow. Craigslist.
 

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Hey, but it's got rolled tone holes! That's gotta be worth 3K right there.:bluewink:

Those straight C-Melody necks make the horn look like an alto going through adolescence. Although they do play a lot better than the earlier curved necks.
 

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That one's been on the Seattle CL for a while. Anything good on CL out there is gone in a couple hours max...tons of guys flipping horns using craigslist, (one of them used to be me).
 

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Hey, but it's got rolled tone holes! That's gotta be worth 3K right there.:bluewink:

Those straight C-Melody necks make the horn look like an alto going through adolescence. Although they do play a lot better than the earlier curved necks.
It's my understanding that there were two versions of the C-Melody available at the same time...a "high pitch" with the straight neck and a "low pitch" with the curved neck. The difference was also sometimes indicated with either an "H" or an "L" stamped below the serial number. I didn't see any signs of an "H" stamped on this one, but it may have been cut off in the photo.
 

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I got Conn C-Mel "L" with straight neck off of Craiglist recently (luckily cost me waaaaaay less than $4k :bluewink:). Thought it was an alto when I first picked it up! The seller only advertised it as being a Conn, so it was a pleasant surpirse and a bit of disappointment at the same time.

And yes, the neck for the one in question looks pulled down.
 

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There were both H and L models in the curved neck and straight neck. The High pitch was probably more common in the curved neck. The curved neck did continue for the Pan-American and stencils however.
 

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I’ve got a 1919 gold L model with a curved neck and a 1924 bare brass (w/ RTH) L model with a straight neck. I use the bare brass neck with my gold horn because it is so much more free-blowing than the curved one—which I believe was phased out in the early 20s. There is no difference between the tone produced by either neck.

There is that little “phantom key” just to the left of the low Eb key. My tech has modified my horns (both C-Mels and NWI, NWII and PanAm tenors) so that this little key is always closed.

Does anyone know if that little key is specific to the L series horns?
 

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Oh, I can play mine with the original curved neck but if you get the chance, try your horn with one of the straight necks. It’s much more free-blowing. Whole different creature. Plus, the straight neck really improves the positioning of the horn during play.

I’ve also bought one of the Aquilasax, Conn C-Mel replacement necks; the curved model with the under slung octave key (which can’t be called a replica), and that also works really well (although the quality is mezza-mezza).

https://aquilasax.3dcartstores.com/Curved-Neck-for-Conn-C-melody_p_33-11.html
 

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I think it was around 1921 that they went with the straight neck. Whatever year it was would be when the microtuner started. For the $4,000 this guy is asking, I can sell a gold plated artist model AND a gold plated full pearl Virtuoso!
 
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