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Discussion Starter #1
Which one has better intonation or sound?
I have a late 10M (1949) without the rolled hole, hows that compared?
How bout value? I am completely blind with these vintage horns as I am a new player in vintage horn arena. Which one retains the most value?

I have cpl choices now, late model tranny with 10M engraving and early 10 (271xxx) both silverplated.
 

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No contest. I have a 282xxx 10M. I used it on Broadway many times. If the pitch was off I'd have swung from a rope. The 271 will have much better pitch than the Transitional Conn. They both sound great, but to me a transitional feels and plays more like a Chu than a 10M, but that's me...
 

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I consider the articulated G# one of the greatest advances in sax keywork (more important than the Selmer LH pinkie table). For that reason alone I avoid Chu keywork. I like my 271 10M.

In fairness, people I know who play Chus say they are able to adjust, but it seems like unnecessary work to me.
 

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I'd always been an enormous fan of the 10M, and I guess I still am. But a few months ago I came across what might be called an early Tranny (222,000) and fell head over heels in love with the sound. However, the intonation was truly horrible, from G2 - C#3. In fact, C#3 sounded a full half step sharp, much more than my lips will compensate for. I only paid $200 for the horn, so I didn't regret the purchase, but it still seemed like a shame that I wouldn't be able to use it.
But - when I tried the Tranny with a Gloger neck the intonation problems went away completely. I know, the Glogers are kind of steep, but still, when you add the 200 for the horn with the 700 for the neck, that still works out to a great buy, and a gorgeous tone and intonation.
If you like the earlier horn but find that it has intonation problems bring it by to a good store, one that carries aftermarket necks, and spend some time with a tuner trying some out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so are you guys saying :

1. tranny can be "out of tune" in several notes? And 10M is more focused in sound thus more "usable"

2. Tranny has bigger sound but not focused in other words, tranny sound is big and rough 10M is smoother

3. Tranny can retain its value in the future?

I am confused even more. I have a limited budget, the tranny is cheaper than the 10M and both in mint condition. Lets say $700 bux different.

I know in the end its a matter of preference. I have a 10M (late model 1949) with straight tone hole, would the early 10M differ in sound? I am selling the 10m just for the sake of obsession to own an early silver plated 10m with rolled tone hole. Mine is bare brass naked, lacquer has been striped off long time ago.
 

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I play a tranny tenor and have never had the intonation problems that ammon decribes. Can't help on the 10m though.
 

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Antigua Winds: SS 3159 Curved Soprano , Pro One Alto & Tenor w/Cryo Necks, BS 3220 low A Baritone
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I have a 1934 Tranny and a 1956 10M, and until recently, the 10M was my backup horn. In a nut shell, I like the Tranny sound and the 10M action. IMO nothing sounds like a Conn Tranny, but the 10M action is so smooth, I can live with the sound. Now don't get me wrong, the 10M sound still blows away just about everything out there, it just doesen't sound like a Tranny.
 

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My saxophone teacher in the later 90's sold his 6m alto, and his 10m Tenor to be able to afford two trannies. He bought a Mint Condition Art Deco Alto, and A Mint condition Art Deco Tenor. These are the Fattest most Beautiful sounding/looking saxophones that you may ever Hear/see in your life!
 

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mjs10 said:
I know in the end its a matter of preference.
This probably holds true for the tone but for the keywork I really don't think you'll find many players (if any) preferring the Tranny. The 10M is a vast improvement in that area. I played both and the Tranny was way too clunky for me.
 

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The only difference between the tranny and the 10M are slightly different shaped table keys, and a different alternate "F#" key. I think that basically the keywork one both is the same after having played both.
 

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Intonation? Well....

Wanna get really confused? OK, well first off no saxophone up through that era is "in tune" per se... as compared to a clarinet, for example. Clarinet embouchure is such that you're usually lipping to the top of the pitch. With saxophone you're lipping somewhere between the top and the bottom of the pitch so you have a little room to lip either way. When I play my 6M I tune it just a hair sharp because I'm ALWAYS lipping down. Same if I'm playing 2nd or 4th tenor because when there's a bari below you and two altos above you you'll have to move your pitch around as you follow your section mates. This is on the assumption you play jazz/big band and non-classical oriented music. (if you're primarily a classical player you may be better off with a modern horn.)

Go with the 10M. You'll have an easier time playing in a 2007 sax section...believe me.

Still confused? Great!



mjs10 said:
so are you guys saying :

1. tranny can be "out of tune" in several notes? And 10M is more focused in sound thus more "usable"

2. Tranny has bigger sound but not focused in other words, tranny sound is big and rough 10M is smoother

3. Tranny can retain its value in the future?

I am confused even more. I have a limited budget, the tranny is cheaper than the 10M and both in mint condition. Lets say $700 bux different.

I know in the end its a matter of preference. I have a 10M (late model 1949) with straight tone hole, would the early 10M differ in sound? I am selling the 10m just for the sake of obsession to own an early silver plated 10m with rolled tone hole. Mine is bare brass naked, lacquer has been striped off long time ago.
 

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mjs10 said:
Which one retains the most value?
In case you are wondering why you still haven't received the correct answer to your question, it's because there isn't one. Your best bet is to buy the horn that works best for your needs so you don't have to worry about its resale value. There is no absolute in market trends. If you are worried about resale, don't pay at the high end of the range for a horn that may not stay with you. If it is the horn you crave, pay whatever it is worth to you and start worrying about mouthpieces.

Mouthpieces, by the way, are often the solution to the issue of intonation. If people report either great satisfaction or complete dismay with a horn's intonation, try to learn what mouthpieces they are using. There is a trend there - many vintage horns do not like modern peashooter (small chamber, high baffle) mouthpieces.

I was going to suggest that you stay with your current horn but when you mention an "obsession to own an early silver plated 10m with rolled tone hole", I can only nod my head and say "Go for it".
 

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If you can afford it and the prices are reasonable - buy both.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
docformat said:
If you can afford it and the prices are reasonable - buy both.
I bought a 10M silverplate 271xxx finally. I love it. I would buy the tranny as well, if I could...

I am saving the money and if Les still has the horn, I'll go for it. hehehe
 
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