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I do not understand the names referring to different time periods of Conns.
I have a 1939 10M so I believe "Naked Lady"or "M Series"would fit here.
But what and when is a transitional and what is it transitioning from.
Also ,I just bought a 12M bari,ser.#338xxx.In threads I have been reading
there are many references to,"old" and "new? and Bb and A which I
understand is the lowest note but what is considered an "old" bari and
which bari years are the most desireable?
My horn is still in a shop in California(I live in Hawaii)There was lots of work to be done but the price was right.Since I enjoy playing and recording
some 4 and 5 part harmony arrangements that I have done I can hardly wait.Using the tenor on the low end just did not work well.
 

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I don't know what time the transitionals started, but they were transitioning from the new wonder horns to the m series. The end of the run for the really good m series with RTH's and all the other features is about 1945. After that they started getting rid of some of the features like the rolled toneholes.
 

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Loss of the Rolled Tone Holes is not necessarily the kiss of death, however. The pro Conn's of the late 1940's and on into the early 1960's use the same body tubes as their predecessors, and my experience with them has been that they play great if they are set up correctly by an excellent tech.

Do a search for 'rolled tone holes' in the Conn forum and you can read all the discussion of those who believe in RTHs and those who don't think they make a difference. I am in the latter camp, but you will find those who feel that RTHs make a difference in the tone. Those who agree with me will say so vociferously. Late Conn 6M, 10M, and 12M horns can be super instruments.

Good luck with yours, whether they have RTHs or not!

Sax Magic
 
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