Sax on the Web Forum banner
21 - 40 of 53 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
I have a 1924 fully restored New Wonder .... I assume this is what is was like new. It plays better than anything I've ever encountered, including a new Keilwerth, and sounds deep and rich but can really scream when pushed. Amazing instrument!!! My only objection is that it doesn't look old. :dontknow:


Turtle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have a 1924 fully restored New Wonder .... I assume this is what is was like new. It plays better than anything I've ever encountered, including a new Keilwerth, and sounds deep and rich but can really scream when pushed. Amazing instrument!!! My only objection is that it doesn't look old. :dontknow:

Turtle
I'm glad to hear this. I have my grandfathers 1924 tenor NW. I played it some as a kid nearly 35 years ago. It has sat since then (at various relatives houses). It has now been reunited with me, need a lot of TLC, but I am hoping to have it restored. Do you have any recordings of one of these? I'm looking for something that will make me say "wow, my instrument can do that????". Seems I can still read a little music but clearly need lots and lots of practice, re-learning that which was forgotten, and hopefully taking it much further.

-Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Hey Dan, here's a good one!!!


Turtle
How can one tell from the video that it is a NW series I versus a series II? Or for that matter, I had a hard time saying for sure what sort of sax is in that video. Then again, it could just be my untrained eye. Nice performance. Clearly one for me to file in the "it's not the instrument's fault" pile as I'm learning!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Just want to say thanks for the pics of the clear distinguishing features, especially the pearl keytouches (which I wouldn't have thought of) and the palm keys. I'd wondered about those stops on the body that I'd seen on a few models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
How can one tell from the video that it is a NW series I versus a series II? Or for that matter, I had a hard time saying for sure what sort of sax is in that video. Then again, it could just be my untrained eye. Nice performance. Clearly one for me to file in the "it's not the instrument's fault" pile as I'm learning!
I can't be absolutely sure that it's a NW I or a NW II .... but it's one or the other. I can say for sure that the strap ring on that New Wonder that Joe is playing is in the original position. It's easy to tell .... I'm thinking of specifically changing the strap ring placement (or put a new ring on in a lower position), and so I was looking for that specifically. Split bell keys and other things ... no high F#, etc. ... it's definitely a New Wonder.

Turtle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Do you have any recordings of one of these? I'm looking for something that will make me say "wow, my instrument can do that????".

-Dan
I have posted some comparison videos of my '24 NW tenor and 10M on Youtube.
A zillion lightyears away from Joe Lovano's shadow but it might shed some light on the sound and
differences of both Conns.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,673 Posts
I'm glad to hear this. I have my grandfathers 1924 tenor NW. I played it some as a kid nearly 35 years ago. It has sat since then (at various relatives houses). It has now been reunited with me, need a lot of TLC, but I am hoping to have it restored. Do you have any recordings of one of these? I'm looking for something that will make me say "wow, my instrument can do that????". Seems I can still read a little music but clearly need lots and lots of practice, re-learning that which was forgotten, and hopefully taking it much further.

-Dan
I currently have a NW II transitional Conn tenor of 1932 on trial and recorded some (amateur level) clips to compare it against my 1952 Selmer SBA. You can find the cilips on page 2 of the thread I made about this horn (check posts #21, 22 and 30). I guess your NW I will have the some core sound, but remember that the player and mouthpiece play normally a bigger role in sound production than the horn.

Here is a link to page 2 of my Conn thread: http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...a-vintage-Conn-of-1932-Opinions-please!/page2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
Speaking of evolution of design, here is my mod of the bis key gap. Glasses Kitchen utensil Automotive lighting Eyewear Tableware


not pretty but works very well, so far.

good old 2-part epoxy and some skill with it.

Its a Pan Am from the late 20's as far as I can tell- no LH posts, smooth LH pinky, Eb trill, etc. superb sound. Using with Marantz HR mouthpiece.

also in the "not pretty but really works" category...try it, you'll never go back!

Chair Bicycle part Musical instrument Automotive tire Gas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I have posted some comparison videos of my '24 NW tenor and 10M on Youtube.
A zillion lightyears away from Joe Lovano's shadow but it might shed some light on the sound and
differences of both Conns.
Wait--is this you?
I've been listening literally every day to those YouTube clips since I discovered them a week or so ago! We share a love for the Pres and I'm also playing on a Carslbad era Ebolin (Doc Tenney refaced it to .090" and lengthened the facing). This thread and your clips combined to really help in my recent decision to go for a 1924 Conn New Wonder!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
at 2:35 you can see the forked Eb key...does that tell us anything?

BTW, I move my strap ring down about an inch or so. Im pretty sure it wasn't a good move...

Also, note that Lovano is directly mic-ed in the video. It definitely is going to change our hearing of it, and who knows what tweaks its getting along the way. It sounds oddly selmer ish at times if you ask me!

I can't be absolutely sure that it's a NW I or a NW II ....igh F#, etc. ... it's definitely a New Wonder.

Turtle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I gotta think that Lovano's in the video is a Chu, or New Wonder II, since "Chu" is specifically mentioned by him and in articles about his past gear. There was one I came across in a Google search that mentioned a 1920's Chu specifically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
re flat v. curved or dished pearls, again I don't think its a hands down yes/no.

The idea is that if you have moisture on your fingers, the dish will help you stay put. That's probably true if your fingers are in some picture perfect placement, dead center of the pearl

What I found is that maximum contact is what you want. So in fact, the flat pearl is more likely to provide that. "How?" you ask, sitting on the edge of your seat, in eager breathless anticipation of the coming englightenment?

Well, if you have your fat little fingers are sitting off the the side ever so slightly, you now have the edge of the dish acting as a kind of ridge from which you can slide or move. On the flat version, you simply have contact, no matter where you are. That's what I felt and though there is an initial kind of good feeling from the dish, it can actually serve the purpose better in a flat. Moving around often put me "on the edge" which wasn't as nice as without the dish edge.

They say a perfectly smooth tire would do better on sheer ice than a snow tire. When its ice, there is nothing to grab or grip so its just friction youre looking for. You get more of that with maximum surface area in play. Seems to be relevant up here in the NE these days. but yes its hypothetical, as its never just ice.

There, now you have the wisdom you came to SOTW for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
BTW, I move my strap ring down about an inch or so. Im pretty sure it wasn't a good move...
!
I'm sorry to hear that .... I have a very nicely restored New Wonder from 1924, I love the sound but it's giving me carpal tunnel. It's predominantly the "left arm crunch" as I call it ..... the way your left arm is in a squeezed, awkward position. Joe looks like he's experiencing this crunch to his left arm, it doesn't look comfortable (and that strap ring is in its original spot, like I said before). I assume that the problem is the strap ring placement (or most of the problem). I wasn't going to change it, but just put a new one on ... 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inches down from the present one. I wish I could try it out first, before it was permanent.

Turtle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
I think its like this: moving it will make something better (left arm crunch?) and something else worse (you have to push the horn forward more). The net is likely to be a negative. Im not entirely sure, but that was my experience.

Having the two rings is a good idea. what the hell, nice to be able to try both for an extended period. Except that of course the extra material will create neophasic interloping inverse sonic effect, which will degrade your sound. (Or is it improve your sound?)

Id guess they tried all of that in the design phase, even tho it was 24 BC when they did it. People were people, even back then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
So the original placement would be better suited for having the horn back near one's right hip? That's actually the most comfortable position for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
I think people generally had shorter arms back in the 1920's. Or they always sat down to play.

I am concerned about the "neophasic interloping inverse sonic effect" though. lol


Turtle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
So the original placement would be better suited for having the horn back near one's right hip? That's actually the most comfortable position for me.
Yes, me too. But, I still get the crunch. Right now, I'm mostly playing the Yamaha (awesome comfort), and only picking up the Conn one day a week. I'm wondering if there isn't a way to hang the horn off something else (a strap around the tube?), to test out this new ring placement, before actually doing it. The guy who did the restoration is strongly advising me to leave it alone ... he likes the way the restoration came out. I can't blame him, but he's not the one playing it.

I was also considering a new RH thumb rest, in a better spot ... The rest of the horn, I think, is fairly comfortable. I don't mind the spread of the keys, or the pinky table (which is pretty good for a very old horn).

Btw, I agree on the pearls .... the flat ones on my NWI are nice. I like them just as well as the curverd ones my Yamaha.

Turtle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,916 Posts
I think that's the case. But frankly, I can't quite figure it out.

That's why I like the idea of having both. Some say its sitting vs standing or out front vs. on the side.

I just found with it lower, I had to have lots of turn to the neck position (of the sax) and other not-quite-right-somehow feeling to it all. Not terrible but I go back an forth between my '49 10M and the NW and its a notable difference.

So the original placement would be better suited for having the horn back near one's right hip? That's actually the most comfortable position for me.
BTW the bis key mod in the photo above achieves the Oleg device as a fix at about 1/1000 the cost.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
6,715 Posts
Talking of pearls and keywork, I consider the "nail-file" G# plate a retrograde step......impossible to slide the finger.
I fit an adapted Runyon palm key riser to both NW1...to stop my finger sliding off, & also to the NW 11 to make the G# key plate less "sticky".
 
21 - 40 of 53 Posts
Top