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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are threads which address this but tried to find again and cannot.
Just got my ‘23 Conn C melody. The “extra” tone hole near the bottom of the body...what is it for? Why do some stuff a cork on top of it to seal it shut, and how does it actually open or how is it supposed to open. I couldn’t figure out a linkage that opened it (perhaps was modified so it doesn’t open?
 

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That's an alternative Eb. You can activate it by playing D and then raising the middle finger of your right hand. It's good for trills, a.o. A lot of players reckon it is susceptible to leaks and close it off with a cork or reverse the spring to hold it shut permanently — or do both at once. Closing it off can affect the pitch of other notes around it: it is best to leave it functional if at all possible, even if you never use it.
 

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I know there are threads which address this but tried to find again and cannot.
Just got my ‘23 Conn C melody. The “extra” tone hole near the bottom of the body...what is it for? Why do some stuff a cork on top of it to seal it shut, and how does it actually open or how is it supposed to open. I couldn’t figure out a linkage that opened it (perhaps was modified so it doesn’t open?
The way it works is that it remains open until the D key is closed which then closes the Eb trill as well. It can be re-opened with the D key held closed by raising the finger above the E key. The pearl is not part of the keycup as on other saxes, but is on a separate arm. This is made possible because there is a small "platform" that allows the D to also close the E key. There are a lot of details to fuss with to get it to operate properly, which I think is why some techs don't want to deal with the additional time and hassle and reach for a cork. Sometimes they also glue or solder the arm with the pearl to the E key cup so it doesn't flop around when the mechanism has been disabled. :)
 

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Actually it remains open until the E key is closed. If I have problems with it (usually worn linkage makes it hard to adjust), I reverse spring the small key.
 

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Actually it remains open until the E key is closed. If I have problems with it (usually worn linkage makes it hard to adjust), I reverse spring the small key.
Of course. What was I thinking?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ah! ok, got it.

So on mine the spring was in fact reversed and nothing has been done to secure anything to anything.
However, I reversed the spring back and there is not enough tension in the opposite direction now to make it useable, so, I put it back to the 'reverse' position until my tech can put it right (I am not inclined to futz with it as it is a very nice silver looking spring and i don't want to break it trying to change direction).

Interestingly (or perhaps not), there is a little notch for the spring to be reversed to, vs. just cramming it on the other side of the post/spring hold.
Is this an original spring hold in the reverse direction or would a tech have modified it later?
 

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Leave it in the closed position. It may make F a bit flatter but only shows up on smaller horns like a soprano. Once you have it set closed, you can put a spot of contact cement under the felt that is under the E pearl to keep it from rattling.
 
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