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Discussion Starter #1
I just thought I'd share, such a gorgeous instrument and completely overhauled / playable. Note the dual octave keys and the G# key has not linkage so you have to release it if you play below it. No resos, so it plays super soft - I needed something for very small venues / matinees. The only MPC that works with it is a Woodwind Company Steel Ebonite, everything else (including the Tonalin and a Conn Knob Shank (presumably late 1910s) sounds like crap. It almost plays in tune :)

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, it was in pretty terrible shape, felt like sandpaper when I got it and in addition it wasn't packed properly so the low D# key guard was completely mangled and the octave lever was bent almost 45 degrees when I got it. But it's all good, all new corks and pads and of course some of the silver plating was gone but there is nothing you can do about it. Playing this kind of instrument gives you a completely new appreciation for the modern horns, with this one, just as an example, the "all open" C# is horribly flat and I have to use one of the side keys to nurse it into tune. Needless to say that concert keys A and E are a pain to play because of the missing G# link but I figure, once I get used to it, it may actually help my intonation with any other horn as well. It was a 6 month project (with many pauses) to get to this but labor of love is just that and love it is now.
 

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Wow! You're going to play a dual 8va key horn on gigs?!? Brave man!!!
Chris Potter played one of these about a year ago on a YouTube video. Didn't slow him down at all either. This has a beautiful early Conn.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Chris Potter played one of these about a year ago on a YouTube video. Didn't slow him down at all either. This has a beautiful early Conn.
The main thing is that some keys are really difficult to play in, others are really no challenge at all, after adjusting to the horn in general. So if you can pick the tune/key, you can play it like any other modern horn but some keys, especially with a lot of G# action will wear you out because you need total timing coordination between left and right hand to avoid squeaking and hissing.

Beautiful! Congratulations to all the work and your determination in playing these masterpieces of craftsmanship!
Thank you! It's like driving a Blitzen Benz! Too much fun!
 

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...but some keys, especially with a lot of G# action will wear you out because you need total timing coordination between left and right hand to avoid squeaking and hissing.
We are spoiled with that feature on modern saxes. Spend some time on clarinet or flute, and you’ll better appreciate some of the nuances that we have come to take for granted.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Is it a low pitch horn for sure? Seems like a lot of these oldies were high pitch.
It doesn't say but I am not talking about high or low pitch, but rather that some of the notes were out of tune with the rest of the horn and fixing the hair cracks in the chimney definitely improved this problem. One was in the A tone hole chimney and that's where everything below turned slightly sharp and that went away. I managed to solder the tone hole from the inside and I am very happy the way it turned out (except for the burn spot on my kitchen counter top where the torch burned through one of the side key holes.. DUH, another lesson learned :)
 

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It doesn't say but I am not talking about high or low pitch, but rather that some of the notes were out of tune with the rest of the horn and fixing the hair cracks in the chimney definitely improved this problem. One was in the A tone hole chimney and that's where everything below turned slightly sharp and that went away. I managed to solder the tone hole from the inside and I am very happy the way it turned out (except for the burn spot on my kitchen counter top where the torch burned through one of the side key holes.. DUH, another lesson learned :)
Well if it is low pitch, it should be pretty well in tune but if it is High Pitch. certain notes will be way off.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The worst is/was the high C# which I have/had to bring up a notch with the side C key. Everything else is pretty well in tune but to your point, the horn is a bit shorter than any of my other altos, so you may well be right in your assumption.
 

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What a swell horn. I commend you for restoring & deploying it!! The double-octave key design is certainly simple. Makes you appreciate how much an automatic octave set-up has to get done, and how much more complicated it can make the mechanism. Think of the octave key on the Ladyface altos!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What a swell horn. I commend you for restoring & deploying it!! The double-octave key design is certainly simple. Makes you appreciate how much an automatic octave set-up has to get done, and how much more complicated it can make the mechanism. Think of the octave key on the Ladyface altos!
Well, thank you! The octave key is the lesser evil compared to the G#. But, after almost 2 years of alto-neglect in favor of tenor, this one brought me back to the Eb world, it is just too much fun to play it :) Mercy Mercy Mercy and some of the other standards are a breeeze but Take 5 is where things are getting really challenging :twisted::twisted:
 
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