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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I am currently working on Ibert's Concertino Da Camera, specifically all of the second movement including the Animato Molto section and i am having trouble with the the high altissimo F. I can get every other altissimo note to come out perfectly but I haven't been able to get the F at all and I was wondering if any of you guys who have played this piece or are just skilled in altissimo could give me a couple tips. Thanks!
If it's important, my setup follows:

Horn: Yamaha Custom EX (V1 Neck)

Mouthpiece: Vandoren AL3/Selmer C*

Reed: Vandoren Traditional Strength 4

Ligature: Vandoren M/O
 

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I didn't take the second mvt up an octave because I don't like the way it sounds up there.

I've played high F in other pieces, and I just used the fingering xox|xox with the eb key, and voiced the next harmonic up from high c.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think the part you're referring to is in the Larghetto. I'm talking about the cadenza on the very last page.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I didn't take the second mvt up an octave because I don't like the way it sounds up there.

I've played high F in other pieces, and I just used the fingering xox|xox with the eb key, and voiced the next harmonic up from high c.
I think the part you're referring to is in the Larghetto. I'm talking about the cadenza on the very last page.
 

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I think the part you're referring to is in the Larghetto. I'm talking about the cadenza on the very last page.
I always take the Mule cadenza. The Rascher one is just too damn hard. There's a good recording of Claude Delangle doing it, and I have one of Mr Rascher himself playing it, and John Kelly too, but that's it.
 

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Sorry for that. I haven't played the Ibert since 1978. I agree with j.max. Also, doesn't the Rascher cadenza have a high F#/Gb? My memory may be bad. I think Bobby Black played the Rascher cadenza, too.
 

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The cadenza is written to double Ab, if memory serves, though J.E. Kelly extends the half-whole diminished scale another m3rd up to double B. In any event, altissimo above D is especially sensitive to excess embouchure pressure. I advocate practicing overtones, and later standard fingering patterns, using a double-lip embouchure to develop the realization that *any* additional jaw/embouchure pressure is not only counter-productive in terms of tonal and intonation goals, but can entirely prevent certain very high altissimo notes from responding at all. If you can do this with a *loose* double-lip embouchure, then you are developing your voicing awareness to the point where you will not bite.
 

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Well, I like those tones. At first sight, your reed seems too hard IMO.

I get those notes with a number 3 reed, a Java Reed and of course I do not play classical saxophone. Fingerings for me are important.

For that F, what I finger is either oxo/xxo plus octave key plus side Bb or oxo/oxo plus octave key.

For F# ooo/xxx plus palm D and palm D#.

For G I finger palm F and look for the overtones and for Ab palm F#. From there, variations on the palm keys and always the F# key. Octave key always open.
 

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The cadenza is written to double Ab, if memory serves, though J.E. Kelly extends the half-whole diminished scale another m3rd up to double B. In any event, altissimo above D is especially sensitive to excess embouchure pressure. I advocate practicing overtones, and later standard fingering patterns, using a double-lip embouchure to develop the realization that *any* additional jaw/embouchure pressure is not only counter-productive in terms of tonal and intonation goals, but can entirely prevent certain very high altissimo notes from responding at all. If you can do this with a *loose* double-lip embouchure, then you are developing your voicing awareness to the point where you will not bite.
I'm curious, Jim, do you require students to play one cadenza or another?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
As of now, I will most likely take the mule cadenza. I have been preparing this for practice auditions to colleges my local solo and ensemble, and for summer institute auditions. As a junior in highschool, you could suspect that I find all of this a bit tough. I do have a question for all of you that have played this piece. If you have heard Claude Delangle's recording of the ibert in the very beginning "Larghetto" section he takes part of it up the octave (which is written in and is optional). Have any of you played it up the octave and what are your opinions on it?
 

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The cadenza is written to double Ab, if memory serves, though J.E. Kelly extends the half-whole diminished scale another m3rd up to double B. In any event, altissimo above D is especially sensitive to excess embouchure pressure. I advocate practicing overtones, and later standard fingering patterns, using a double-lip embouchure to develop the realization that *any* additional jaw/embouchure pressure is not only counter-productive in terms of tonal and intonation goals, but can entirely prevent certain very high altissimo notes from responding at all. If you can do this with a *loose* double-lip embouchure, then you are developing your voicing awareness to the point where you will not bite.
Drake... is it double Concert Ab? As I remember that is the case and shoud be a double F por alto.
 
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